Louis Poirier

Louis Poirier
National Research Council Canada | NRC · Oceans, Coastal and River Engineering Research Centre

PhD

About

17
Publications
18,363
Reads
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267
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
July 2003 - August 2011
The University of Calgary
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • I completed my MSc in Atomic and Molecular Optics and my PhD in Ice Friction in the Sport of Bobsleigh.
May 2000 - August 2002
Université de Moncton
Position
  • NSERC USRA
Description
  • I held three NSERC Undergraduate Student Research Awards at l'Université de Moncton. I worked two summers with Alain Haché studying 1D photonic crystals and one summer with Pandurang Ashrit studying electrochromic effects in thin films.

Publications

Publications (17)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Climate change and its potential impacts upon northern coastal infrastructure are pressing concerns. Changing patterns of sea ice formation, movement and break-up may impact design criteria for such infrastructure. The National Research Council (NRC) with the help of the Department of National Defence, Defence Construction Canada and their contract...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In the summer of 2015, the Department of National Defense's began construction of a new deep water refueling station in Nanisivik In October of 2017, two load panels were installed on the outward face of one of three cylindrical cells making up the wharf. In June of 2018, a field team performed a short measurement program to validate the pressure p...
Technical Report
Full-text available
There are a large number of bridges in Canada which cross water expanses that freeze in the winter. Ice loads on bridge piers, which depend on floe size as well as ice strength, thickness and temperature, have to be factored in the design of these structures. Climate change is affecting ice growth patterns, in response to changes both in the wat...
Article
Full-text available
We have examined the ice loading forces on two piers of the Confederation Bridge during the 2012-13 ice season using the updated NRC ice load monitoring system. The new system allows better time synchronization of the tiltmeter and video data from each pier as well as the anemometer. The new system has allowed for the analysis of two large ice load...
Article
Full-text available
Scientific investigations to measure and explain the curl (lateral displacement) of a granite stone sliding on ice in the sport of curling go back almost 100 years (Harrington, 1924). Nevertheless, some prominent researchers in the field remain baffled as to the physical explanation of this lateral displacement. And no one has thus far been able to...
Article
Full-text available
Ice friction affects us in many ways, from slippery roads to winter sports. In cold regions, ice friction influences ice interaction with itself, which determines the motion of ice floes. It also influences the structural forces resulting from ice interactions with fixed and moored structures and with floating vessels. Ice friction also affects sur...
Article
Full-text available
We report the first derivation of the coefficient of friction between bobsleigh runners and ice from experimental measurements performed in a controlled environment. In a series of experiments on both horizontal ice and a track sloped at 6.80°, a radar gun was used to sample the speed of a moving sled in the range of (1–10) m/s at a sample rate of...
Article
The goal of this work is to determine the ice hardness for athletic ice surfaces relevant to skating and bobsleigh. The results will be used to adapt F.A.S.T. 1.0, a computational model (Penny et al., 2007) used to calculate the coefficient of friction between a steel blade and ice. An important aspect of the model is the size of the contact area b...
Article
Full-text available
The primary objective of this work is to examine the effect of the bobsleigh runner profile on ice / runner friction. The work is centered on a computational model (F.A.S.T. 3.2b) which calculates the coefficient of friction between a steel blade and ice. The first step was to analyze runners used in the sport of bobsleigh. This analysis was perfor...
Article
This paper briefly describes a computational model developed by our group to calculate the coefficient of friction between a steel blade and ice. We then discuss two experiments executed to specify certain aspects of the computational model. We measured the ice hardness of five athletic ice surfaces and found it to be ((-0.6 ± 0.4)T + (14.7 ± 2.1))...
Article
This work uses numerical methods to investigate the feasibility of modifying an instrument used in speed skating to analyze blades from four different ice sports. The instrument, a handheld rocker gauge, is adapted to create a device that can effectively profile other types of skate blades and bobsleigh runners. Since there are significant differen...
Article
The limiting group velocities available with a one-dimensional periodic medium composed of 1/4 wavelength sections are studied. For all realistic combination of medium parameters, it is found that there are superior and inferior limits to the group velocity. We use numerical analysis to investigate the effect of the refractive index mismatch, the p...
Article
We demonstrate that coaxial cables with a periodic impedance exhibit dispersion properties specific to photonic crystals, albeit on a much lower frequency scale. Highly superluminal (>2c) pulse propagation is observed near the photonic band gap at 10 MHz. The influence of group velocity dispersion and crystal length on the traveling speed and shape...
Article
Full-text available
We study the propagation of brief electric pulses along a coaxial line having a spatially periodic impedance. The periodicity causes anomalous dispersion and the appearance of a stop band in transmission near 10 MHz. Group velocities of up to three times the speed of light are observed in that spectral region, in accordance with calculations based...
Article
We demonstrate that large-scale photonic crystals can be used to simulate nonlinear optical effects occurring in real photonic crystals. A crystal made of coaxial segments with periodic impedance is used to create a stop band in transmission near 10 MHz. When a semiconductor rectifying diode is added to the crystal, a nonlinear mode of propagation...
Article
Coaxial lines with periodic impedance exhibit transmission stop bands analogous to the ones observed in optical photonic crystals. Because they are macroscopic in size and possess bandgaps in the MHz to GHz range, coaxial crystals are easier to work with and useful to model their micron-sized, dielectric counterparts. In this paper we study the ban...

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