Lorien Nesbitt

Lorien Nesbitt
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Department of Forest Resources Management

Doctor of Philosophy

About

34
Publications
9,482
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648
Citations
Citations since 2017
32 Research Items
647 Citations
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Introduction
I am an Assistant Professor of Urban Forestry at the University of British Columbia. My research focuses on urban forestry, environmental justice, climate change, and health, using a socio-ecological lens.

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
With the majority of the world’s human population now living in cities, urban forests provide an increasingly important range of ecosystem services, from improved air quality and climate change adaptation to better public health outcomes and increased tourism revenues. The importance of these ecosystem services in urban environments, and the centra...
Article
Urban vegetation, and in particular urban forests, provide a wide range of ecosystem services to urban societies and may thus be classified as environmental goods. Their status as goods suggests that urban societies’ interactions with urban vegetation should be subjected to equity analyses to determine the fairness of such interactions. However, de...
Article
This research examines the distributional equity of urban vegetation in 10 US urbanized areas using very high resolution land cover data and census data. Urban vegetation is characterized three ways in the analysis (mixed vegetation, woody vegetation, and public parks), to reflect the variable ecosystem services provided by different types of urban...
Article
Urban green equity, broadly defined as equitable access to and governance of urban forests, mediates urban residents’ ability to derive ecosystem services from urban forests. This article explores conceptions of, barriers to, and strategies for urban green equity as understood by urban forestry and related green practitioners in three multicultural...
Article
Full-text available
This systematic literature review identifies and critiques methodological trends in green gentrification research (focusing on studies of vegetative greening) and provides suggestions for advancing this field. Findings reveal (1) research has largely focused on U.S. case studies; (2) early work employed qualitative methods but quantitative analyses...
Article
Full-text available
This article assesses the distribution of urban vegetation in 31 Canadian cities to determine whether certain social-economic/demographic factors are associated with increased proximity to greenness. Using spatial lag models, Canadian census data, and urban ‘greenness fractions’ derived from Landsat imagery, we find diversity between cities in the...
Article
Full-text available
As researchers have continued to expand the bounds of green gentrification scholarship, understanding of what green gentrification is and how to identify the phenomenon on the ground has grown obscured. In an attempt to bring clarity to this conversation, our research presents an urban green gentrification framework, based on findings from a scopin...
Article
Full-text available
There is substantial evidence detailing the ecological and social benefits provided through urban greening. However, research in the field of urban green equity has revealed that these benefits are not enjoyed equitably by all residents; existing disparities in the distribution, accessibility, and experience of urban greening disproportionately aff...
Article
Full-text available
Background Growing evidence suggests that exposure to green space is associated with improved childhood health and development, but the influence of different green space types remains relatively unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the association between early-life residential exposure to vegetation and early childhood development an...
Article
Background Emerging studies have associated low greenspace and high air pollution exposure with risk of child attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Population-based studies are limited, however, and joint effects are rarely evaluated. We investigated associations of ADHD incidence with greenspace, air pollution, and noise in a population...
Article
Urban forests are increasingly recognized and integrated into cities’ climate policies as a nature-based solution to climate change. However, the integration of urban forests may conflict with other climate measures. Densification of urban areas, a common approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and meet other goals, can create hostile growing c...
Article
The sustainable provision of urban forest benefits can be threatened by the occurrence of sudden, major disturbance events, such as forest fires, insect outbreaks, and extreme weather events, which are considered to be “pulse” disturbance events from a socio-ecological systems perspective. Sound urban forestry programs are needed to prepare for the...
Article
Full-text available
Forest ecosystem resilience is of considerable interest worldwide, particularly given the climate crisis, biodiversity loss, and recent instances of zoonotic diseases linked to deforestation and forest loss. Novel, digital-based technologies are also increasingly ubiquitous. We provide a more comprehensive understanding of how these new technologie...
Article
Background Several studies have assessed the relationship between exposure to natural environments (NEs) and childhood mental health and development. In most cases, a positive association has been found, but results are inconsistent, and the strength of association is unclear. This inconsistency may reflect the heterogeneity in measurements used to...
Article
While being major greenhouse gas (GHG) emitters, cities also suffer some of the most severe climate change impacts. Urban forests have gained increasing recognition as nature-based solutions to climate change via the various benefits they provide, such as carbon sequestration and temperature regulation. Many cities have developed climate change and...
Chapter
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, is a complex, multicultural, and growing metropolis that has been shaped by multiple Indigenous and immigrant cultures. Its recent history presents a microcosm of the many opportunities and challenges faced by cities around the world: colonialism and Indigenous marginalization, multiple waves of immigration, mai...
Article
Full-text available
Urban forests are increasingly acknowledged as sources of multiple benefits and central to climate resilience and human well-being. Given these diverse and significant benefits, it is important to govern urban forests so as to ensure that all residents have equitable access and enjoyment. Understanding urban forest preferences, and including them i...
Chapter
Full-text available
Sustainable Development Goals: Their Impacts on Forests and People - edited by Pia Katila December 2019
Article
Urban forestry and arboriculture are male-dominated industries. Although women have experienced current and historical marginalization in these industries, recent years have seen more young women embrace opportunities and pursue careers in these fields. In order to understand and enhance women’s participation in urban forestry and arboriculture, th...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Deficiencies in childhood development is a major global issue and inequalities are large. The influence of environmental exposures on childhood development is currently insufficiently explored. This project will analyse the impact of various modifiable early life environmental exposures on different dimensions of childhood development....
Article
Forest planners employ various techniques to mitigate the visible effects of harvesting, including by manipulating the shape of harvest blocks. Shape is a common indicator of preference in aesthetic evaluations of landscape and harvest block design. However, the majority of perception-based research in the field of landscape aesthetics has focused...
Thesis
Urban vegetation provides a suite of ecosystem services to urban residents, from regulating microclimate to supporting good physical health. As more and more people make cities their home, urban vegetation is becoming a key part of urban residents’ well-being. Urban green equity is a central aspect of the distribution of and governance over urban v...
Article
Full-text available
Do urban residents experience societal benefits derived from urban forests equitably? We conducted a broad-scale spatial analysis of the relationship between urban greenery and socioeconomic factors in the Portland metropolitan area. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index was derived from National Agriculture Imagery Program images to map urban...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Today, the majority of the world’s population lives in urbanized areas, with a trend toward increasing urbanization and density in cities. As pressure on finite urban forest resources intensifies, appreciation of the benefits that they provide to residents and visitors is growing. In Canada, the urban forest includes a variety of vegetation and l...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Map the governance structure of and understand decision-making processes in urban forests from the perspective of municipal managers and other urban forest stakeholders
Project
To better understand the ecosystem services offered by urban forests and their value to urban residents.
Project
The central goal of this project is to explore and analyze the socio-spatial and temporal dynamics of urban green equity and environmental justice in the context of urban forests, with the aim of informing and creating more just urban forest spaces.