Lori Daniels

Lori Daniels
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences

About

110
Publications
24,884
Reads
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4,843
Citations
Citations since 2017
51 Research Items
2478 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600

Publications

Publications (110)
Poster
Full-text available
High fuel loads and aggressive fire behaviour in many dry interior Douglas-fir forests result from fire suppression, forest management and climate change. This disproportionately affects remote communities like Stswecem'c Xget'tem First Nation (SXFN). We co-designed this study with SXFN, and quantified fuel loads and predicted fire type in SXFN Tra...
Article
Complex canopy cover conditions often challenge the accurate measurement of many individual tree attributes that are pivotal to the sustainable management of forest resources. Advances in drone laser scanning (DLS) and mobile laser scanning (MLS) have enabled the acquisition of high-density point clouds with the potential to better resolve detailed...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous land stewardship and mixed‐severity fire regimes both promote landscape heterogeneity, and the relationship between them is an emerging area of research. In our study, we reconstructed the historical fire regime of Ne Sextsine, a 5900‐ha dry, Douglas‐fir‐dominated forest in the traditional territory of the T'exelc (Williams Lake First Na...
Article
Full-text available
Wildfires burn heterogeneously across the landscape and create complex forest structures. Quantifying the structural changes in post-fire forests is critical to evaluating wildfire impacts and providing insights into burn severities. To advance the understanding of burn severities at a fine scale, forest structural attributes at the individual tree...
Article
Full-text available
Context In fire-excluded forests across western North America, recent intense wildfire seasons starkly contrast with fire regimes of the past. The last 100 years mark a transition between pre-colonial and modern era fire regimes, providing crucial context for understanding future wildfire behavior. Objectives Using the greatest time depth of digiti...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding climate as a driver of low- to moderate-severity fires in the Montane Cordillera Ecozone of Canada is a priority given predicted and observed increases in frequency and severity of large fires due to climate change. We characterised historical fire-climate associations using 14 crossdated fire-scar records and tree-ring proxy reconstr...
Article
Full-text available
Fire regimes in North American forests are diverse and modern fire records are often too short to capture important patterns, trends, feedbacks, and drivers of variability. Tree‐ring fire scars provide valuable perspectives on fire regimes, including centuries‐long records of fire year, season, frequency, severity, and size. Here, we introduce the...
Article
Full-text available
The dominant command and control fire governance paradigm is proven ineffective at coping with modern wildfire challenges. In response, jurisdictions globally are calling for transformative change that will facilitate coexisting with future fires. Enacting transformative change requires attention to historical governance attributes that may enable...
Article
Full-text available
Warming temperatures and changing weather patterns are causing more frequent and severe disturbances in western North American forests. The increasing length and severity of recent wildfire seasons have annually caused widespread injury to millions of trees, facilitating the subsequent outbreak of various subcortical insect species that infest dama...
Chapter
Full-text available
This article is part of the Resilience Pathways Report. The report has the following objectives: a) to share knowledge about existing practices and recent advances in understanding and managing disaster and climate risk in BC, including some information on relevant federal programs, and b) to provide insights on gaps and recommendations that will h...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous fire stewardship enhances ecosystem diversity, assists with the management of complex resources, and reduces wildfire risk by lessening fuel loads. Although Indigenous Peoples have maintained fire stewardship practices for millennia and continue to be keepers of fire knowledge, significant barriers exist for re-engaging in cultural burni...
Article
Full-text available
Wildfires in the wildland-urban interface (WUI) are increasingly threatening lives and livelihoods. These growing impacts have prompted a paradigm shift toward proactive wildfire management that prioritizes prevention and preparedness instead of response. Despite this shift, many communities remain unprepared for wildfires in the WUI due to diverse...
Article
Full-text available
The global rise in temperature and associated changes in climate have led to decline of forests around the globe, across multiple species and ecosystems. A particularly severe example of this is yellow-cedar ( Callitropsis nootkatensis ) decline along the coast of British Columbia and Alaska, where anthropogenic climate change has led to reduced in...
Article
Full-text available
Old-growth forests in the Pacific Northwest are being fundamentally altered by climate change. A primary example of this is yellow-cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis ), a culturally and economically important species, which has suffered widespread decline across its range since the beginning of the twentieth century. We used tree rings to compare the...
Article
Full-text available
With the growing challenge of addressing modern fire risk, land managers and researchers are increasingly looking to Indigenous knowledge as a primary source of information for enabling resilience of fire-dependent social-ecological systems (SES). Although this is an important step forward for recognizing the contribution of Indigenous peoples to f...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding climate as a driver of low- to moderate-severity fires in the Montane Cordillera Ecozone of Canada is a priority given predicted and observed increases in frequency and severity of large fires due to climate change. We characterised historical fire-climate associations using 14 crossdated fire-scar records and tree-ring proxy reconstr...
Article
Full-text available
The accurate prediction and mitigation of wildfire behaviour relies on accurate estimations of forest canopy fuels. New techniques to collect LiDAR point clouds from remotely piloted aerial systems (RPAS) allow for the prediction of forest fuels at extremely fine scales. This study uses a new method to examine the ability of such point clouds to ch...
Article
Full-text available
Worldwide, Indigenous peoples are leading the revitalization of their/our cultures through the restoration of ecosystems in which they are embedded, including in response to increasing ‘megafires’. Concurrently, growing Indigenous-led movements are calling for governments to implement Indigenous rights, titles and treaties, and many settler-colonia...
Preprint
Full-text available
ContextIn fire-excluded forests across western North America, recent intense wildfire seasons starkly contrast with fire regimes of the past. The last 100 years mark a transition between pre-colonial and modern era fire regimes, providing crucial context for understanding future wildfire behavior.Objectives Using the greatest time depth of digitize...
Article
Full-text available
Implementation of wildfire‐ and climate‐adaptation strategies in seasonally dry forests of western North America is impeded by numerous constraints and uncertainties. After more than a century of resource and land use change, some question the need for proactive management, particularly given novel social, ecological, and climatic conditions. To ad...
Article
Full-text available
In the 2017 and 2018, 2.55 million hectares burned across British Columbia, Canada, including unanticipated large and high-severity fires in many dry forests. To transform forest and fire management to achieve resilience to future megafires requires improved understanding historical fire frequency, severity, and spatial patterns. Our dendroecologic...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The global rise in temperature and associated changes in climate have led to decline of forests around the globe, across multiple species and ecosystems. Yellow‐cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis) decline is one of the most severe in North America. We found abundant evidence of tree decline and mortality on Haida Gwaii across multiple waters...
Article
Wildfire is a significant driver of forest and land cover change in the central interior of British Columbia, Canada. Fuel type maps are a primary input to fire behavior calculations and simulation studies that assess wildfire threat at the landscape level. However, these thematic maps are not easily produced at the scale and speed needed to assess...
Article
Full-text available
We celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Canadian Journal of Forest Research by reflecting on the considerable progress accomplished in select areas of Canadian wildfire science over the past half century. Specifically, we discuss key developments and contributions in the creation of the Canadian Forest Fire Danger Rating System; the relationships...
Article
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The environmental lapse rate used to estimate historical treeline advance was incorrectly reported as 0.006 °C/1000 m; a value of 0.006 °C/m was used in the calculations.
Article
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The distributions of many high-elevation tree species have shifted as a result of recent climate change; however, there is substantial variability in the movement of alpine treelines at local to regional scales. In this study, we derive records of tree growth and establishment from nine alpine treeline ecotones in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, char...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The 2017 and 2018 record-breaking wildfire seasons in British Columbia highlighted the vulnerability of communities to large, intense wildfires. Today, fire-affected communities and landscapes throughout the province are still experiencing social, economic and ecological impacts. The COVID-19 pandemic has elevated the urgency of proactively address...
Article
Full-text available
To investigate drought influences on mixed-severity fire regimes in montane forests of southeastern British Columbia, we developed a Douglas-fir latewood-width chronology and tested its associations with drought records across the fire season. Associations were strong between drought and latewood-widths particularly for June–August. Based on the ch...
Article
From ancient timbers to mountaintop forests, trees hold important climate clues
Article
Full-text available
1.Fire is a powerful ecological and evolutionary force that regulates organismal traits, population sizes, species interactions, community composition, carbon and nutrient cycling, and ecosystem function. It also presents a rapidly growing societal challenge, due to both increasingly destructive wildfires and fire exclusion in fire‐dependent ecosys...
Article
Full-text available
Research Highlights: Yellow-cedar decline on the island archipelago of Haida Gwaii is driven by warm winter temperatures and low winter precipitation, which is caused by anthropogenic climate change and exacerbated by the positive phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Background and Objectives: Declining yellow-cedars are limited by physi...
Article
Full-text available
Before the advent of intensive forest management and fire suppression, western North American forests exhibited a naturally occurring resistance and resilience to wildfires and other disturbances. Resilience, which encompasses resistance, reflects the amount of disruption an ecosystem can withstand before its structure or organization qualitatively...
Article
British Columbia experienced three years with notably large and severe wildfires since 2015. Multiple stand-replacing wildfires occurred in coastal–transitional forests, where large fires are typically rare, and thus, information on post-fire carbon is lacking. Because of their carbon storage potential, coastal–transitional forests are important in...
Article
We compared three monthly adaptations of the daily Drought Code (DC) of Canada’s Fire Weather Index System and applied them to interpret drought conditions associated with historical fires in montane forests of south-eastern British Columbia. The three adaptations were compared with the monthly mean DC calculated from daily values for the Palliser...
Article
Full-text available
Fire severity mapping is conventionally accomplished through the interpretation of aerial photography or the analysis of moderate- to coarse-spatial-resolution pre- and post-fire satellite imagery. Although these methods are well established, there is a demand from both forest managers and fire scientists for higher-spatial-resolution fire severity...
Article
Full-text available
Sustainable fire management has eluded all industrial societies. Given the growing number and magnitude of wildfire events, prescribed fire is being increasingly promoted as the key to reducing wildfire risk. However, smoke from prescribed fires can adversely affect public health. We propose that the application of air quality standards can lead to...
Article
Full-text available
Reconstructions of defoliation by larch bud moth (LBM, Zeiraphera diniana Gn.) based on European larch (Larix decidua Mill.) tree rings have unraveled outbreak patterns over exceptional temporal and spatial scales. In this study, we conducted tree-ring analyses on 105 increment cores of European larch from the Valais Alps, Switzerland. The well-doc...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report summarizes results from a web-based survey of communities in British Columbia (BC), conducted in 2016-7 by researchers in the Faculty of Forestry at the University of British Columbia. The survey aimed to better understand the views of municipalities, regional districts, First Nations communities, and reserves, regarding plans and actio...
Article
Full-text available
The western spruce budworm (WSB; Choristoneura freemani Razowski) shapes Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests throughout western North America with periodic, severe landscape-level defoliation events. The largest and most continuous recorded defoliation occurred in the 2000s, largely centered in the Williams Lake and 100 Mile...
Article
To enhance understanding of how climate and humans influenced historical fire occurrence in the montane forests of Jasper National Park, we crossdated fire-scar and tree age samples from 172 plots. We tested effects of drought and climatic variation driven by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific North American (PNA) pattern on fire o...
Article
Full-text available
The South American Dendroecological Fieldweek (SADEF) associated with the Third American Dendrochronology Conference was held in El Bolsón, Argentina, in March 2016. The main objective of the SADEF was to teach the basics of dendrochronology while applying specific knowledge to selected research questions. The course included participants and instr...
Chapter
Over the past four decades dendroecology has been instrumental in shaping contemporary understanding of how forests around the world change over time. Dendroecological research has provided important new insights into the functioning of temperate, boreal, and tropical forests at sub-annual, annual, decadal, and centennial time scales. Importantly,...
Chapter
Wildfire is a key disturbance agent in forests worldwide, but recent large and costly fires have raised urgent questions about how different current fire regimes are from those of the past. Dendroecological reconstructions of historical fire frequency, severity, spatial variability, and extent, corroborated by other lines of evidence, are essential...
Chapter
Full-text available
Forest decline is driven by several factors interacting in complex ways, and it is often exacerbated by climate, adding complexity to the process and making it more difficult to identify the causing factors. The long-term perspective provided by tree rings has proven to be successful for disentangling the causes of forest decline worldwide. We pres...
Article
Full-text available
Both mountain pine beetle (MPB) Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins and fire leave scars with similar appearance on lodgepole pine Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia Engelm. that have never been compared microscopically, despite the pressing need to determine the respective effects of MPB and fire injury on tree physiology. We analysed chang...
Article
Tree-age data in combination with fire scars improved inverse-distance-weighted spatial modelling of historical fire boundaries and intervals for the Darkwoods, British Columbia, Canada. Fire-scarred trees provided direct evidence of fire. The presence of fire-sensitive trees at sites with no fire scars indicated fire-free periods over their lifesp...
Book
Dendroecologists apply the principles and methods of tree-ring science to address ecological questions and resolve problems related to global environmental change. In this fast-growing field, tree rings are used to investigate forest development and succession, disturbance regimes, ecotone and treeline dynamics and forest decline. This book of glob...
Article
Novel forest decline is increasing due to global environmental change, yet the causal factors and their interactions remain poorly understood. Using tree-ring analyses, we show how climate and multiple biotic factors caused the decline of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) in 16 stands in the southern Canadian Rockies. In our study area 72% of white...
Article
Ecosystem services (ES) span the interface of social and ecological systems, which makes them inherently challenging to measure. Tracking ES patterns over long time frames is crucial for understanding slow variables and complex interactions, but long-term studies of ES are rare. Historical records can play an important role in revealing temporal pa...
Article
Fire suppression has altered the historical mixed-severity fire regime and homogenised forest structures in Jasper National Park, Canada. We used dendrochronology to reconstruct fire history and assess forest dynamics at 29 sites in the montane forests. Based on fire scars and even-aged post-fire cohorts, we determined 18 sites had mixed-severity f...
Article
Fire suppression has altered the historical mixed-severity fire regime and homogenised forest structures in Jasper National Park, Canada. We used dendrochronology to reconstruct fire history and assess forest dynamics at 29 sites in the montane forests. Based on fire scars and even-aged post-fire cohorts, we determined 18 sites had mixed-severity f...
Article
Full-text available
This dataset contains sedimentological and paleoenvironmental measurements from a 351.5 cm sediment core that was collected from Pyatts Lake, south-east British Columbia, Canada. Sedimentological data include: radiocarbon dates and age-depth model, magnetic susceptibility, loss-on-ignition values, and particle size distributions. Palaeoecological d...
Article
Is mal del ciprés, the widespread decline and death of Austrocedrus chilensis trees, caused by a single pathogen or multiple factors? Using a novel dendrochronological approach, we disentangled the influences of climatic variation on the radial growth decline and death of A. chilensis trees in declining forests. We distinguish possible causes of re...
Article
Full-text available
Mixed-severity fire regimes are important drivers of forest dynamics, stand structural attributes, and regional and local landscape heterogeneity, but they remain poorly understood. We reconstructed site-level fire histories using fire scars and even-aged cohorts at 20 sites in two contiguous watersheds in southeastern British Columbia, Canada, a r...
Article
Remote sensing technologies are an ideal platform to examine the extent and impact of fire on the landscape. In this study we assess that capacity of the RapidEye constellation and Landsat (Thematic Mapper and Operational Land Imager to map fine-scale burn attributes for a small, low severity prescribed fire in a dry Western Canadian forest. Estima...
Article
Full-text available
The western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman; WSB) is a widespread and destructive defoliator of commercially important coniferous forests in western North America. In British Columbia, Canada, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) is the most prevalent host, and records show that significant outbreaks have primarily occurred in the...
Article
Although enjoyable and rewarding, fieldwork has inherent hazards and risks. In this article, we describe five steps to help students plan for safe and successful fieldwork in a variety of study sites. In addition to identifying potential hazards and mitigating them, successful graduate research should include a communications plan, strong leadershi...
Article
Traditional, stage-based, classification systems provide a qualitative measure of decay and have been widely used to monitor and model terrestrial coarsewood and aquatic largewood dynamics. These systems are limited by subjective assignment of wood to classes, lack of measurements relating wood morphology with decay classes, and poor estimates of e...
Article
Canopy gaps created by the death of one to a few trees can exert a dominant influence on forest structure and composition by affecting the growth of nearby trees. Previous research in old-growth forests of coastal British Columbia, Canada indicated that most western redcedar (Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.)...
Article
Full-text available
Maps depicting historic fire regimes provide critical baselines for sustainable forest management and wildfire risk assessments. However, given our poor understanding of mixed-severity fire regimes, we asked if there may be considerable errors in fire-regime classification systems used to create landscape-level maps. We used dendrochronological fie...
Article
Full-text available
We used dendroclimatology to quantify inter-annual to multi-decadal climatic variation effects on white spruce radial growth in southwest Yukon, Canada. Local climate is dry and cold, such that tree growth was primarily moisture- rather than temperature-limited, although the mechanisms varied temporally. During the 20th century, significant increas...
Article
This research examines the regeneration dynamics of Nothofagus dombeyi and Austrocedrus chilensis in A. chilensis-dominated forests growing near the eastern limit of N. dombeyi where precipitation is limiting. In these forests the widespread decline and mortality of overstory A. chilensis trees, known as ‘mal del ciprés’ (cypress sickness), generat...
Article
Full-text available
We applied dendrochronology to quantify the effects of climatic variation on white spruce radial growth in southwest Yukon, Canada. Local climate is cold and dry, thus tree growth was primarily limited by moisture, rather than temperature, although the mechanisms varied through time. Regionally, both temperature and precipitation increased in recen...
Article
Tree mortality is a critical driver of stand dynamics, influencing forest structure, composition, and capacity for ecosystem service provision. In recent years, tree mortality has been gaining attention as dramatic occurrences of forest die-off have been linked to climate change. Using permanent sample plot data, we examined tree mortality rates in...