Loraleigh Keashly

Loraleigh Keashly
Wayne State University | WSU · Department of Communication

Ph.D.Applied Social Psychology

About

55
Publications
28,959
Reads
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2,663
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 1997 - present
Wayne State University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Workplace bullying and aggression; quality of working relationships
August 1997 - present
Wayne State University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • negotiation, neutral intervention, final seminar in dispute resolution, intro to doctoral studies
Education
September 1983 - May 1988
University of Saskatchewan
Field of study
  • Applied social psychology
September 1981 - August 1983
University of New Brunswick
Field of study
  • Applied psychology
September 1975 - May 1979
The University of Calgary
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (55)
Chapter
The culture of academe and academics has been characterized as hostile and cruel with campuses described as “rife” with bullying. In this chapter, extant global research on bullying in academe is reviewed to assess the validity of these characterizations. Given the central role of faculty in shaping the nature of higher education, the experiences o...
Book
This volume embodies the twin purpose of highlighting topics beyond the purview of themes commonly associated with workplace bullying, emotional abuse and harassment and of presenting insights into those occupations, professions and sectors which either have received extensive research attention or hold a pronounced propensity to trigger workplace...
Article
Full-text available
Academic bullying is a serious issue that affects all disciplines and people of all levels of experience. To create a truly safe, productive, and vibrant environment in academia requires coordinated and collaborative input as well as the action of a variety of stakeholders, including scholarly communities, funding agencies, and institutions. In thi...
Article
Academic bullying is a serious issue that affects all disciplines and people of all levels of experience. Coordinated global actions against academic bullying in higher education seem to be the only effective and timely pathway to remove „power poisoning“ at any level in our science backyard. Abstract Academic bullying is a serious issue that affe...
Article
Full-text available
Workplace bullying is a pernicious workplace problem that harms employees and organizations alike. Targets suffer mental and physical consequences of repeated abuse. Organizations experience consequences such as diminished worker productivity and increased turnover. In some cases, even workplace violence. While these instances are thankfully rare,...
Article
The COVID-19 pandemic may exacerbate factors influencing abusive workplace behaviors in general such as psychological health, economic and social inequities. This is true in academic and research environments where we can expect to see an increase in the incidence of academic bullying. Research and experience shows that academic bullying will have...
Chapter
The culture of academe and academics have been characterized as hostile and cruel with campuses described as “rife” with bullying. In this chapter, extant global research on bullying in academe is reviewed to assess the validity of these characterizations. Given the central role of faculty in shaping the nature of higher education, the experiences...
Article
Full-text available
By virtue of their formal organizational and professional roles, Ombuds are key organizational influencers. They are empowered to comment on what they see and hear and are viewed as highly credible reporters. As a result, Ombuds are well positioned to identify specific issues that need to be addressed and to develop and explore options with others...
Chapter
Considering that relatively little attention has been paid to the higher education context, we believe that such work will add to our growing knowledge base on workplace bullying and mobbing and help us test hypotheses derived from extant theory, developed across a number of workplace domains. Second, workplace bullying and mobbing (manifestations...
Chapter
Bullying among residents of seniors’ communities is a growing concern for staff, residents and their families (Bonifas, 2016). Existing research has revealed a great deal about why the older adult may bully. Specifically, the transition to these living arrangements reflects a need for increased support in response to declines associated with aging....
Book
This volume embodies the twin purpose of highlighting topics beyond the purview of themes commonly associated with workplace bullying, emotional abuse and harassment and of presenting insights into those occupations, professions and sectors which either have received extensive research attention or hold a pronounced propensity to trigger workplace...
Article
Bullying is a pressing social problem and public health issue that exists across contexts. Thus, it is no surprise that bullying exists in higher education. Given faculty's key role in the quality and health of an institution, we focus on faculty experiences of bullying, with particular attention to bullying by colleagues. We examine how bullying's...
Article
This article describes the development of a laboratory simulation designed to study the etiology, escalation, and resolution of intergroup conflict in a systematic and holistic manner. The Intergroup Conflict Simulation involves two groups of equal power and status, averaging four persons each, meeting for a series of five 2 hr sessions. The groups...
Article
Full-text available
Work is an important yet understudied life domain for adolescents that has important implications for their development and well-being. Work relationships, particularly with supervisors and coworkers, are critical influences on teens. To the extent these relationships are negative, as evidenced in workplace bullying, the impact on teens can be wide...
Article
Although much research has been done on workplace aggression and bullying over the past two decades, academics have paid relatively little attention to bullying in their own institutions. In this article, we discuss what is currently known about bullying in academia, with a particular focus on faculty behavior, and apply empirical and conceptual fi...
Article
Full-text available
Agression at the service delivery interface (the point of contact between service provider and service recipient) has become a focus of much recent research attention. However, much of what we know is based on cross-sectional survey data - which tells us little about the underlying dynamics within specific aggressive incidents. Further, these data...
Article
Aggression at the service delivery interface (the point of contact between service provider and service recipient) has become a focus of much recent research attention. However, much of what we know is based on cross-sectional survey data – which tells us little about the underlying dynamics within specific aggressive incidents. Further, these data...
Chapter
Workplace emotional abuse Just before leaving for the weekend, George answers a call on the help line and quickly realizes it's from Mr. French, who's always got a problem late in the day. His computer's crashed again, he informs George, and this time he demands to talk to somebody competent! George has had his share of problems with Mr. French, th...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reviews the concept of emotional abuse in the workplace and applies relevant findings and concepts to psychological harassment as defined in the legislation enacted in Quebec beginning June 1, 2004. It is noted that the terms are highly related by definition and that a clear similarity exists. Accordingly, a prospective look is taken at...
Article
This chapter provides an overview of research from the United Kingdom and North America on adult bullying at work. It is important to note that the bulk of research the authors review is from the United Kingdom and Europe. Persistent hostility at work such as bullying has only recently become the subject of systematic research attention in the Unit...
Article
Full-text available
Two strong imperatives for healthcare managers are reducing costs of service and attracting and retaining highly dedicated and competent patient care and support employees. Is there a trade-off or are there organizational practices that can further both objectives at the same time? High-involvement work systems (HIWS) represent a holistic work desi...
Article
Based on employee surveys and financial data from 146 facilities of the Veterans' Healthcare Administration, this study found that high-involvement work practices (HIWP) result in increased employee satisfaction and decreased patient service costs. Overall costs per patient are reduced despite the initial investment required by HIWP.
Article
Time spent at work was examined as a predictor of aggression experienced in the workplace relative to identifiable job risk factors and victim characteristics (i.e., self-esteem). Based on past research, it was expected that job risk factors and self-esteem would predict aggression experienced at work. The expectation that time spent at work predic...
Article
Full-text available
The most frequent form of workplace aggression is not physical, it is emotional and psychological in nature. Known by many names, emotional abuse at work is rapidly becoming recognized as pervasive and costly both in individual and organizational terms. Most of the research to date on emotional abuse at work has utilized survey and other quantitati...
Article
Full-text available
Violence and harassment in the workplace have garnered substantial public and research attention in the past decade. Most attention has been focused on the more extreme forms of physical violence such as homicide and, to a lesser degree, sexual and racial harassment in the workplace. However, recent surveys of workplaces suggest there is another fo...
Article
Despite the recognition that poor working relationships can contribute to strain (Chen and Spector 1991, Cooper and Marshall 1978, Kahn and Byosiere lY92, Spector 1987, Spector et al. 1988) and increasing concern over violence and aggression in the workplace (Northwestern National Life Insurance Co. 1993), little research attention has been paid to...
Article
This study considered three important issues in the conflict intervention literature: (1) the contributions of third-party process control and outcome control to disputants' judgments of intervention procedures; (2) the nature of control prior to a decision being made, i.e. the process-content distinction; and (3) the influence of contextual variab...
Article
Full-text available
Dealing with hostile interpersonal relationships at work has been the topic of many popular books and workshops. Yet, with the exception of sexual harassment, there is surprisingly little mention in the organizational research literature on the nature, extent, and costs of abusive work interactions. These more frequent, more tolerated, and, thus, m...
Article
A recent focus in conflict intervention theory and research has been on identifying the criteria that disputants and intervenors use in their selection and evaluation of a dispute resolution procedure. Relative importance of intervention criteria has been found to be not only dependent upon the nature of the dispute but also upon who is intervening...
Article
Third party interventions designed to de-escalate intergroup conflict can be differentiated by their underlying assumptions regarding conflict. Process-oriented approaches such as third-party consultation try to de-escalate conflict by taking a subjective emphasis and focusing on the basic relationship between parties, their attitudes, and their pe...
Article
Full-text available
This article provides a conceptual rationale for the potential complementarity of international mediation and third party consultation or problem-solving within the context of a contingency model. Social conflict is viewed as a dynamic process involving a mix of objective and subjective factors which changes over time, thus creating opportunities f...
Chapter
The ubiquitous phenomenon of intergroup conflict has a built-in tendency to escalate, as indicated in the eclectic model and as substantiated by a host of research results documented in the preceding chapters. Human limitations and fallibilities in perception and cognition lend themselves to misperceptions, cognitive errors, and self-fulfilling exp...
Chapter
An eclectic model of intergroup conflict presents a multilevel, interactive, process-orientated, longitudinal picture of the development, escalation, and resolution of intergroup conflict. As such, the model is congruent with a general call in social psychology for the development of middle range theories that integrate variables from different lev...
Article
Full-text available
Pdf article from Conflict Management in Higher Education Report, Volume 1, Number 3, (August/September 2000), studied the effects of mistreatment of graduate students by faculty on their health and psychological well-being.

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