Lonny Douglas Meinecke

Lonny Douglas Meinecke
Philander Smith College

PhD (Psychology)

About

10
Publications
38,868
Reads
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20
Citations
Introduction
I am grateful to be an assistant professor of psychology at Philander Smith College in Little Rock Arkansas. My focus is honor for one another and wonder for life.
Additional affiliations
July 2015 - present
King University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Instruction and facilitation of online undergraduate and professional studies in the field of psychology, within the behavioral and health sciences department. Ensuring course goals are met and helping learners overcome unexpected difficulties.
September 2014 - November 2014
UC Berkeley's "Science of Happiness"
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Leading conversations, increasing course depth for the Wellness Dojo inside the SOH community on the Sennseis platform
July 2011 - present
Grand Canyon University
Position
  • Doctoral Student Researcher
Description
  • Researching the critical success factors in online learners and educators
Education
July 2011 - February 2013
Grand Canyon University
Field of study
  • Psychology
February 2009 - June 2011
University of Phoenix
Field of study
  • Information Technology
September 1974 - June 1976
West Valley College
Field of study
  • English, French

Publications

Publications (10)
Preprint
Full-text available
This dialogue stems from an email exchange between Dr. Mary Ann Markey and Dr. Lonny Douglas Meinecke. One might call this form of research, grounded email, in keeping with grounded theory. The subject began as the need to define a standard term (legacy tokens). It seems so tragic that some feel their lives are so unmeaningful, that some dramatic r...
Research Proposal
Full-text available
Abstract: The focus of this research is to explore the possibility of prejudice between what is more mental than biological, framed as a form of mental idolatry in the biological search for a lasting conceptual authority. The equivalence between ingroup favoritism and mental favoritism, along with the equivalence between outgroup antipathy and huma...
Research Proposal
Full-text available
Abstract The focus of this research is to explore the possibility of prejudice between what is more mental than biological, framed as a form of mental idolatry in the biological search for a lasting conceptual authority. The equivalence between ingroup favoritism and mental favoritism, along with the equivalence between outgroup antipathy and human...
Thesis
Full-text available
All individuals with end stage renal disease (ESRD) will perish from the disease unless they receive a donor kidney in time. The purpose of this research was to compare groups of candidates on the kidney transplant waiting list in the U.S. Renal Data System, to test whether some groups waited longer to receive a kidney due to a physical or mental a...
Article
Full-text available
What is silence? Is there a psychology of silence—and what does the literature reveal? The exploration of the concept of silence in the psychological literature reveals an almost biological entity—that speaks, grows, hurts, and conceals—despite being nothing at all. Humans are a verbal species, so verbal in fact that the very absence of sound seems...
Article
Full-text available
The interesting thing about things that evolve, is that they rarely recall what they evolved from. Nativist or empiricist, innate grammars or reinforced learning, every time a child is born, that child must start over and reacquire a language its forebears have spoken for millennia. This paper argues that humans seem innate with respect to language...
Thesis
Full-text available
The reflection in the looking glass has inspired uncertainty since the afternoons when Lewis Carroll charmed children in a rowboat about a parallel world of odd rules on the other side. Ramachandran’s discovery that looking glass therapy (MVF) relieves negative symptoms in amputees altered the concept of measurable physical symptomatic relief. Rese...
Article
Full-text available
Popular culture is enamored with the novel and curious, and hoarding is certainly both. Hoarding is an abnormal behavior typically consisting of three components: (a) a lack of impulse control when acquiring items, (b) severe panic when asked to relinquish any of the worthless hoarded items, and (c) failure to recognize the dysfunction created by a...
Article
Full-text available
This paper posits the need for a fourth component in the tripartite model of attitude. Attributions by spiritual persons differ from those of individualists and collectivists in that attributions of blame are dismissed (using forgiveness), and attributions of self-credit are ignored (credited instead to God). Arguments include the need to consider...
Article
Full-text available
Researchers in cognitive psychology study two separate phenomena in the hope of discovering an independent understanding of causality for each—spatial continuity for its role in expectation and attentional focus, and change blindness for its role in missed expectation and attentional deficit. The basic premise of this study is that we do not so muc...

Questions

Questions (38)
Question
Can a scientist conduct experiments on himself and publish them in a journal without IRB approval? My understanding is that IRB approval is needed to guarantee ethical/informed human subjects research and to avoid unexpected legal problems from naive subjects later on. A psychologist is well informed of the Belmont ethics, benefits, and risks, and would not sue himself. Has anyone successfully done this (used expert subjects only)?
Question
My research is taking me into directions suggesting that our neurons are members of living systems with their own native needs and desires. Our nervous tissue looks and acts remarkably like living terrain (and urgent inhabitants of that terrain) but at a level of detail we deem to be mechanical in nature. More often than not, our models of long-term, short-term, and working memory view these colonies of cells as here to serve an enduring human agent and its conceptual kingdom, thus either able or unable to perform their genetically conditioned roles (no matter the cost to the living systems that dedicate their being to objectives they cannot see or benefit from). Thank you for any references to current theoretical stances that have attempted to see all of our cells as living individuals in their own right, rather than inessential parts of an enduring "organism'" and its phenomenological struggle to survive.
Question
Hello all,
I am aware of "formal methods" as it is used in computer science, to make sure our specifications are mathematically and logically sound (before we put them into a specific language). Isn't there a tool or form of notation so we can do that while we construct legitimate hypotheses for psychological research?
It is common knowledge that the construction of natural language questions (surveys about thinking and behavior), can be very questionable when it comes to construct validity. For example, did I cover everything? Am I even asking the right question? Trial and error without a formal test of our logic doesn't seem very efficient.
Does anyone know of a formal notation or research tool that lets us test natural language questions for how "sound" they are? After all, whether computer code (if/then we can do this) or human language (if/then we can assume that), it's pretty much the same logic. Thanks for any advice!
Question
My question relates to differential parental behavior in non-human species. We tend to favor the survival of our well-behaved offspring, and let our "ill-behaved" offspring wither or perish. What other species exhibit this scornful, selective kind of parental attachment to offspring?
Question
Can someone contribute to this question? I have observed that many humans increase their monitoring of uncertain things when their own unmanageable stressors increase. But when I look around nature, I do not seem to see any species (or natural phenomena) that exist to "monitor" the actions of other phenomena... This seems a human oddity (the belief that nature needs to be watched over by people). Yet, the physical elements can't really "do" anything they aren't made to do (choose to react incorrectly). Why do we worry they won't do the "right" thing? If I mix so much of this with so much of that, I don't have to wonder if they will react well. Thoughts please?

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The purpose of this study is to see whether it takes longer to see God when a person knows what to look for, or when a person does not know what to look for. Perhaps, when a person is open to God making Himself known in unexpected ways, that person will see evidence of God sooner (and more often) than he or she expected.
Project
Biophilia is about reverence for life. This research will explore the similarity between human attitudes toward nature and an amensal relationship in an otherwise symbiotic system. This research will argue on behalf of a more mutual attitude - one whose aim is a mutually beneficial one, not an amensally beneficial one.
Project
Researching the unnatural prioritization and valuation of mental phenomena over biological phenomena. The current trajectory of our unnatural drive/selection (favoring the survival of ordered expectations over simple urgency) suggests the extinction of an unpredictable diversity of (autonomous) life for sake of eternal (invariant) information. My labels for this are cognitive idolatry (epistemological) and psychological favor (sociopolitical), and it correlates to Margulis' work on endosymbiosis (that all things are symbiotic, including mental life, which is amensal with respect to its underlying biology).