Lode De Waele

Lode De Waele
Tilburg University | UVT · Department of Organization Studies

Doctor of Business Administration
Always looking for new collaborations and open to suggestions :-)

About

10
Publications
1,527
Reads
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39
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2021 - present
Tilburg University
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • I teach courses such as Financial Management, Introduction to Organization Studies, Academic and Professional Skills and support master students in obtaining their theses.
July 2017 - July 2018
University of Rijeka
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • I give guest-lectures about the Sino-European trade relations and the broader political geography.
September 2016 - November 2021
University of Antwerp
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • I give courses about strategic management, more specifically topics such as business modelling, external and internal analysis in the Master after Master Industrial Pharmacy program. This is a joint venture between the UA, KUL, UGent and VUB. Furthermore, I teach the course Introduction to Business Administration.
Education
September 2004 - June 2008
University of Antwerp
Field of study
  • Applied economics

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Bribery is a complex and critical issue in higher education (HE), causing severe economic and societal harm. Traditionally, most scholarship on HE corruption has focused on institutional factors in developing countries and insights into the psychological and motivational factors that drive HE bribery on the micro-level mechanisms are virtually non-...
Preprint
Bribery is a complex and critical issue in higher education (HE), causing severe economic and societal harm. Traditionally, most scholarship on HE corruption has focused on institutional factors in developing countries and insights into the psychological and motivational factors that drive HE bribery on the micro-level mechanisms are virtually non-...
Article
Full-text available
Bribery is a complex phenomenon rooted in both individual motives and the greater institutional context. Experimental research into causal mechanisms that drive bribing behavior is still scarce. To date, there is no empirical evidence on how the society-regarding motivational survey measure of Public Service Motivation (PSM) and the other-oriented...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: Numerous of today’s public sector organisations (PSOs) can be characterised as hybrids. Hybridity is caused by different (at times conflicting) demands that stem from the institutional environment, which is likely to affect performance measurement in these organisations. This paper focuses on the relationship between hybridity and organisa...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines how the Post-New Public Management administrative model adopted by a teaching hospital in Portugal shapes innovation processes. We find that innovation is a multi-level organizational phenomenon that relies substantially on the interplay of three factors: (1) trust-based professional autonomy at the individual level; (2) an in...
Article
We theorize that people with high Public Service Motivation (PSM) are especially prone to engage in prosocial rule-breaking (PSRB) behavior, which ultimately leads to discriminatory practices, particularly for clients associated with positive affect. We conduct an original vignette study in three countries (Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands) wi...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines how the Post-New Public Management administrative model adopted by a teaching hospital in Portugal shapes innovation processes. We find that innovation is a multi-level organizational phenomenon that relies substan- tially on the interplay of three factors: (1) trust-based professional autonomy at the individual level; (2) an...
Article
Full-text available
Hybriditeit impliceert dat publieke organisaties logica’s van verschillende managementvisies, zoals een klassieke bureaucratie, new public management en een netwerkgerichte organisatie, met elkaar integreren. De literatuur stelt dat hybriditeit belangrijke consequenties heeft op de prestatievorming en transparantie van de organisatie. Over de drijf...
Chapter
Full-text available
PurposeThe discussion about public sector performance is still present today, despite the profound research that has already tried to address this subject. Furthermore, theory links negative effects on organizational performance with increased levels of organizational complexity. However, literature thus far did not succeed to put forward a success...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Public sector corruption is a common, but severely understudied, phenomenon in Public Administration (PA). Prior studies have shown that public sector corruption – e.g., in the form of bribery and rule-breaking – causes inequality in access to public services. This inefficient allocation of resources and lack of accessibility equity seriously together seriously undermine the public’s trust in government and other public institutions (Getz & Volkema 2001). Researchers trying to examine the origins of public sector corruption traditionally use three different lenses, assuming that (1) the institutional context is accountable (Navot, Reingewertz, & Cohen 2016), (2) the organization is the key driving force (Frost & Tischer 2014), or (3) individual character traits determine deviant behavior (Bolino & Grant 2016). To date, there is neither sufficient empirical evidence supporting either lens, nor a unified theory of public sector corruption. The Public Sector Corruption (CorPuS) project aims to advance theoretical insights and collect rich evidence about a few of the main underlying mechanisms of corruption and their interaction at the micro, meso, and macro level of behavior by conducting rigorous experimental research in fifteen countries. Following recent calls by van Witteloostuijn (2016) and Walker, Lee, and James (2017) for more experimental work, we account for context effects by replicating our experimental study within different sets of countries, organizations, and populations. That is, our study involves a multi-lab design that involves replication and meta-analysis, employing both the method of agreement and difference (Walker et al. 2018). Furthermore, we hope to derive practical advice for public sector managers on ways to prevent corruption. ∙ Principal researcher & project manager together with: Lode De Waele & Arjen van Witteloostuijn. ∙ Other Collaborators: Catherine Althaus, Ting GONG, Dennis Hilgers, Fabian Homberg, Mei-Jen HUNG, KIM Sangmook, Ming-feng KUO, Jenny Lewis, Trang LINH, Davor Mance, Fabio Monteduro, Janine O’Flynn, Guillem Ripoll Pascual, Adrian Ritz, Lisa Schmidthuber, SHIM Dong Chul, Tsai-tsu SU, Jeannette Taylor, Richard Walker, Bradley Wright, & Hanyu XIAO.
Project
Corruption is a critical and unresolved issue in higher education (HE), causing severe harm. It is a complex phenomenon rooted in both individual motives and in the greater institutional context. Because of its delicacy and effects of social desirability, the number of unreported cases in reality might be much higher than anticipated. Furthermore, partially because of these social desirability effects, empirical research that provides more insights in the causal mechanisms that drive HE bribery is still scarce. This study investigates the conditions under which university students in Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands are willing to offer bribes to pass important exams and whether study-related stress influences this intent.
Project
Bureaucracies are expected to treat customers equally and are assumed to attract people with high Public Service Motivation (PSM). PSM is argued to have positive effects on individual and organizational performance. However, a growing body of literature points out that PSM might also entail darker sides that so far have not been empirically scrutinized (in detail). This study demonstrates the fundamental paradox of modern bureaucracies: People with high PSM are especially prone to engage in (pro-)social rule-breaking (SRB) behavior, which ultimately leads to discriminatory practices threatening the very foundation of the bureaucratic principle. We test our argument by conducting an original vignette-based experiment in three countries (Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands) with 1,239 observations in total. Our findings provide first behavioral evidence on the linear relationship between PSM and the likelihood of SRB. The results reveal that the relation between PSM and SRB is moderated asymmetrically by client-based information affect cues: Negative affect cues have a larger negative effect than positive affect cues have a positive effect. This means that high-PSM people are not only more likely to engage in SRB, but that they also discriminate more sharply between clients they perceive to be more deserving than their low-PSM peers. Furthermore, we reveal that respondents abusing their discretion in this way were fully aware of the harming effect for the organization, while the benefit for the customer appeared to be a less significant motivation.