Lizanne Roxburgh

Lizanne Roxburgh
Endangered Wildlife Trust | EWT · Conservation Science Unit

PhD

About

39
Publications
17,494
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656
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
331 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100

Publications

Publications (39)
Article
Monitoring population trends is important for evaluating the effectiveness of conservation interventions. An annual aerial census of three crane species, the Grey Crowned Crane Balearica regulorum, Blue Crane Anthropoides paradiseus and Wattled Crane Bugeranus carunculatus, was performed in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa over the past 23 year...
Article
Reliable estimates of wildlife mortality due to wildlife-vehicle collisions are key to understanding its impact on wildlife populations and developing strategies to prevent or reduce collisions. Standardised approaches for monitoring roadkill are needed to derive robust and unbiased estimates of mortality that are comparable across different study...
Article
Full-text available
Aichi Target 12 of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) contains the aim to ‘prevent extinctions of known threatened species’. To measure the degree to which this was achieved, we used expert elicitation to estimate the number of bird and mammal species whose extinctions were prevented by conservation action in 1993–2020 (the lifetime of th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aichi Target 12 of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) aims to 'prevent extinctions of known threatened species'. To measure its success, we used a Delphi expert elicitation method to estimate the number of bird and mammal species whose extinctions were prevented by conservation action in 1993 - 2020 (the lifetime of the CBD) and 2010 - 20...
Article
Full-text available
Across Africa, transport infrastructure, including roads, is being built in over 30 planned development corridors that are likely to have major impacts on remaining natural habitats and associated biodiversity. Linked to this is the projected increase in human population size, which is predicted to grow by 1.3 billion people by 2050. Road ecology i...
Article
Full-text available
Roads impact wildlife through a range of mechanisms from habitat loss and decreased landscape connectivity to direct mortality through wildlife-vehicle collisions (roadkill). These collisions have been rated amongst the highest modern risks to wildlife. With the development of “citizen science” projects, in which members of the public participate i...
Book
Full-text available
Of the 343 species, subspecies and subpopulations recorded from the assessment region, six were Not Evaluated (considered vagrant) and five are Extinct, leaving 331 taxa that were assessed. Overall, 57 taxa are threatened (six Critically Endangered, 20 Endangered, 31 Vulnerable) and 35 are Near Threatened. Proportional to the number of taxa assesse...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, species distribution modelling (SDM) was applied to the management of secondary forests in Benin. This study aims at identifying suitable areas where the use of candidate pioneer species, such as Lonchocarpus sericeus and Anogeissus leiocarpa, could be targeted to ensure at low cost, currently and in the context of global climate cha...
Poster
Full-text available
In January 2014 we launched a national public awareness campaign to report WVC sightings utlising a number of social-media platforms for reporting as well as the launch of a cellphone app called ‘Road Watch’. As a result, almost 13,000 roadkill data points have been collected with the assistance of over 150 volunteers from across the country. In ad...
Article
Full-text available
In partnership with the University of Pretoria, the Endangered Wildlife Trust’s Carnivore Conservation Programme collared six male and three female free-roaming Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) in the Thabazimbi area in Limpopo Province, South Africa. This study was undertaken to determine the spatial ecology of free-roaming Cheetahs that occur outside...
Article
Full-text available
Background The International Crane Foundation (ICF) / Endangered Wildlife Trust’s (EWT) African Crane Conservation Programme has recorded 26 403 crane sightings in its database from 1978 to 2014. This sightings collection is currently ongoing and records are continuously added to the database by the EWT field staff, ICF/EWT Partnership staff, vario...
Article
Full-text available
The global Blue Swallow Hirundo atrocaerulea was classified as Vulnerable in 2010 on account of its small and rapidly declining population estimated at less than 1 500 pairs. We undertook this study to gain a better understanding of the current status and threats facing this migratory species. Three previously unknown areas that might be part of th...
Article
Malawi is under heavy pressure for land by an increasing human population, and there is little natural habitat left outside gazetted wildlife and forest reserves. Widespread collecting of birds in Malawi’s small protected rain forests by the National Museum of Malawi in conjunction with Western academic institutions has been taking place almost yea...
Article
Full-text available
Asia and Africa have experienced recent catastrophic declines in populations of most species of vultures (Thiollay 2006, Ogada et al. 2011, Virani et al. 2011). While the declines in Asia have been linked to poisoning by the veterinary drug diclofenac (Oaks et al. 2004), the reasons for the declines across Africa remain poorly understood (Ogada et...
Article
Full-text available
The Shoebill Balaeniceps rex is a threatened bird of inaccessible papyrus swamps in central and eastern Africa, and is thus difficult to census. We conducted an aerial survey of Shoebills in the Bangweulu Swamps of north-eastern Zambia using a microlight aircraft in July 2006, and used strip transect methodology to estimate population size. We then...
Article
Full-text available
Mistletoes typically grow on tall old trees. Does this positive size-prevalence relationship result simply from the accumulation of infections as trees age, or do other factors related to tree size lead to differential dispersal, germination, establishment or survival of mistletoes? We examined patterns of infection prevalence and intensity of the...
Article
Full-text available
Disperser effectiveness is the contribution that a disperser makes to the future reproduction of a plant (Schupp 1993), and it has two components: quality and quantity of dispersal. Quantity of dispersal is a function of the number of visits that a disperser makes to a fruiting plant and the number of seeds that are dispersed during each visit. Qua...
Article
Full-text available
The timing of the chick-rearing phase is known to have a profound effect on the reproductive success of birds. However, little is known about the energetic costs faced by the parents during different periods of the breeding season. These costs may have vital consequences for both their survival and future reproduction. In most studies, daily energy...
Article
Summary • Mistletoe infection prevalence typically differs between host tree species. Differences in infection prevalence between hosts are probably the product of mistletoe–host compatibility and frequency of seed deposition on that host by dispersers. • We recorded patterns of infection prevalence of two mistletoes, Phragmanthera dschallensis Eng...
Article
Full-text available
Although the renal responses of birds to dehydration have received significant attention, the consequences of ingesting and processing large quantities of water have been less studied. Nectar-feeding birds must often deal with exceptionally high water intake rates in order to meet their high mass-specific energy demands. Birds that ingest large vol...
Article
In nectarivorous birds, specialization for feeding on nectar has led to a simple gut structure with high sugar digestive efficiencies and rapid gut passage rates. These features of the digestive system may make digestion of more complex, protein-rich food sources, such as pollen or insects, less efficient. In this light, we hypothesized that sugar...
Article
Most aquatic vertebrates are ammonotelic, whereas terrestrial vertebrates are typically uricotelic or ureotelic. However, the principal form of nitrogenous waste product in the urine of an animal may vary, depending on environmental conditions. Anna's hummingbird (Calypte anna) was found to switch from uricotely at high ambient temperature (T(a)) t...
Article
Full-text available
Uricotely (uric acid >50% of urinary nitrogen) in birds was once considered ubiquitous. However, Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) have been shown to be an exception to this rule; under conditions of low ambient temperature (T(a)) and on a nitrogen-free diet, they increased their water intake and often became ammonotelic (ammonia >50% of urinary n...
Article
Nectarivorous birds are represented by three major radiations: honeyeaters and sunbirds in the Old World and hummingbirds in the New World. Costa's hummingbirds and New Holland honeyeaters have unusually low nitrogen requirements, which have been related to the species' low-protein, high-sugar diets. Therefore, we hypothesised that orange-tufted su...
Article
Full-text available
The characteristics of daily torpor were measured in the round-eared elephant shrew Macroscelides proboscideus (Macroscelidea) in response to ambient temperature and food deprivation. Elephant shrews are an ancient mammal order within a superordinal African clade including hyraxes, elephants, dugongs and the aardvark. M. proboscideus only employed...
Article
1.1. We examined the desert-dwelling grasshopper, Calliptamus barbarus, to determine whether it used evaporative cooling, and if differences existed in the use of evaporative cooling between the small males and larger females. Male C. barbarus are the smallest grasshoppers tested for their use of evaporative cooling.2.2. Calliptamus barbarus use ev...
Article
1.1. Oxygen consumption (VO2), thermal conductance (C), body temperature (Tb) and evaporative water loss (EWL) of Macroscelides proboscideus were measured at air temperatures from 5 to 38°C.2.2. The lowest VO2 was approximately that predicted for a eutherian of equal body weight. Minimal C was higher than predicted. EWL was high for an arid adapted...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
A regional revision of the Red List statuses of mammals. The Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) partnered with the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI), supported by collaborations with MammalMAP (a partnership between the Animal Demography Unit, University of Cape Town and the Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria) and the Species Survival Commission (SSC) of the IUCN. Key stakeholders and contributors also included South African National Parks (SANParks), provincial conservation agencies, universities, museums and the private sector. The assessment region included South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland, as well as the footprint of all transfrontier parks in these three countries. Link to project: https://www.ewt.org.za/Reddata/reddata.html
Archived project
Determine the ecological requirements of the Blue Swallow and advocate for the inclusion of the Blue Swallow’s requirements in, where appropriate, conservation plans and decision making processes regarding land and resource uses (e.g. Environmental Impact Assessments). Determine where all the Blue Swallow populations are located, as well as their sizes, within Africa. Determine and monitor Blue Swallow population demographics throughout its range in Africa. Implement monitoring programmes for all the Blue Swallow populations in Africa. Determine the threats, and propose mitigation measures, to the Blue Swallow and its grassland and wetland habitats in Africa