Liza R Moscovice

Liza R Moscovice
Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology | FBN · Institute of Behavioral Physiology

PhD

About

34
Publications
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1,877
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
Ensuring horse welfare is a central aim in equestrian activities. Training is an important context for welfare, as horses form long-lasting representations of people and actions at a young age. However, only a few studies have addressed horses’ emotional responses during early training with humans. In this study, we followed N = 19 young horses, in...
Article
Full-text available
Group-living primates exhibit variable reactions to intergroup encounters (or IGEs), reflecting species-specific strategies and individual motivations. In chimpanzees ( Pan troglodytes ), dominating in IGEs provides fitness benefits. Less is known about responses to IGEs in bonobos ( Pan paniscus ) despite their equal relevance for understanding th...
Article
Full-text available
Animals respond to inherently rewarding or punishing stimuli with changes in core affective states, which can be investigated with the aid of appropriate biomarkers. In this study we evaluate salivary cortisol (sCORT) and salivary oxytocin (sOXT) concentrations under baseline conditions and in response to two negatively- and two positively-valenced...
Preprint
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Domestic pigs produce twice as many offspring as wild boars, but little is known about the effects of selection pressures for increased productivity on pig behavior and welfare. From an evolutionary perspective, producing larger litters is expected to increase parent-offspring conflict, which may help to explain why piglets from larger litters are...
Chapter
Modern pig housing environments provide animals with essential resources, but from an animal’s point of view, they are quite barren and deprive them of the opportunity to make full use of their natural behavioural repertoire and actively work for these resources. The lack of stimulation resulting from such environments compromises animal welfare. T...
Article
Full-text available
The extent of differentiation of social relationships within groups is a means to assess social complexity, with greater differentiation indicating greater social complexity. Socio-ecological factors are likely to influence social complexity, but no attempt has been made to explain the differentiation of social relationships using multiple socio-ec...
Article
Full-text available
Altering one’s emotional state in response to the emotional expressions of others, called emotional contagion, is a well-studied phenomenon in humans and many nonhuman animals. Here we describe the methods that are typically used to assess changes in the emotional state in demonstrators and the transmission of emotions to naïve observers. We then r...
Article
Full-text available
In some species habitual same-sex sexual behavior co-occurs with high levels of intra-sexual alliance formation, suggesting that these behaviors may be linked. We tested for such a link by comparing behavioral and physiological outcomes of sex with unrelated same-and opposite-sex partners in female bonobos (Pan paniscus). We analyzed behavioral out...
Chapter
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology was founded in 1997 with the goal of applying interdisciplinary comparative approaches to advance understanding of the evolutionary history and current behavioral diversity of humans and nonhuman primates. Within the Institute, members of the Department of Primatology gain insights into human evolu...
Article
Objectives: Female bonobos (Pan paniscus) are characterized as highly affiliative and cooperative, but few studies have quantified the strength and stability of female intra-sexual relationships or explored how variation in social relationships influences cooperation. We measure female social preferences, identify causes of variation in preference...
Article
Full-text available
Referential and iconic gesturing provide a means to flexibly and intentionally share information about specific entities, locations, or goals. The extent to which nonhuman primates use such gestures is therefore of special interest for understanding the evolution of human language. Here, we describe novel observations of wild female bonobos (Pan pa...
Article
Full-text available
In species with a high degree of fission-fusion social dynamics, fusions may trigger social conflict and thus provide an opportunity to identify sources of social tension and mechanisms related to its alleviation. We characterized behavioral and endocrine responses of captive female bonobos (Pan paniscus) to fusions within a zoo facility designed t...
Article
Full-text available
Among male chacma baboons (Papio hamadryas ursinus), rank positions in the dominance hierarchy are fiercely contested. Physical fighting is costly but relatively rare in this species. Instead, disputes are frequently resolved using displays that include loud, repetitive “wahoo” (two-syllable bark) vocalizations. We previously found that males of al...
Article
The neuro-hypophysial hormone oxytocin (OT) has been implicated in female reproductive and maternal behaviors and in the formation of pair bonds in monogamous species. Here we measure variation in urinary OT concentrations in relation to reproductive biology and socio-sexual behavior in a promiscuously breeding species, the chacma baboon (Papio ham...
Article
This study examines the behavioral ecology of a chimpanzee population on Rubondo Island in Lake Victoria, Tanzania, over 40 years after chimpanzees were first introduced to the island from captivity. Despite little pre-release habitat assessment, rehabilitation, or post-release monitoring, these chimpanzees are one of the only released populations...
Article
Full-text available
Analyses of the pattern of associations, social interactions, coalitions, and aggression among chacma baboons (Papio hamadryas ursinus) in the Okavango Delta of Botswana over a 16-year period indicate that adult females form close, equitable, supportive, and enduring social relationships. They show strong and stable preferences for close kin, parti...
Article
Longevity is a major component of variation in fitness in long-lived iteroparous species [1-4]. Among female baboons, variation in breeding lifespan accounts for approximately 50% of the variation in lifetime fitness [5, 6]. However, we know little about the causes of variation in longevity in primates or other long-lived mammals. Savannah baboons...
Article
In chacma baboons (Papio hamadryas ursinus), adult males and lactating females form preferential associations, or ‘friendships’, that provide protection against potentially infanticidal attacks. Little is known about the mechanisms by which males and females form friendships, or the function of friendships for males. We examined the relationship be...
Article
Full-text available
The apparent rarity of contingent cooperation in animals has convinced many investigators that such reciprocity is unimportant, stimulating consideration of alternative explanations for cooperation, such as by-product mutualism and biological markets motivated by the likelihood of immediate reward. Nevertheless, there is also limited evidence that...
Article
Full-text available
The release of any species into a novel environment can evoke transmission of parasites that do not normally parasitize the host as well as potentially introducing new parasites into the environment. Species introductions potentially incur such risks, yet little is currently known about the parasite fauna of introduced primate species over the long...
Article
Full-text available
Adult male chacma baboons (Papio hamadryas ursinus) form preferential associations, or friendships, with particular lactating females. Males exhibit high levels of affiliative contact with their friends' infants and defend them from potentially infanticidal attacks (Palombit et al. 1997). Little is known about males' associations with juveniles onc...
Article
Full-text available
Sociality has evolved in many animal taxa, but primates are unusual because they establish highly differentiated bonds with other group members. Such bonds are particularly pronounced among females in species like baboons, with female philopatry and male dispersal. These relationships seem to confer a number of short-term benefits on females, and s...
Article
We examined seasonal patterns of fruit availability, dietary quality, and group size in the descendants of an introduced chimpanzee population on Rubondo Island, Tanzania. The site has supported a free-ranging population without provisioning for 40 years. Our goals were to determine whether Rubondo chimpanzees experience periods of fruit shortage,...
Article
Full-text available
We identified 3 nematodes not previously reported in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) introduced on Rubondo Island, Tanzania: Protospirura muricola, Subulura sp., and Anatrichosoma sp. Vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops pygerythrus), rodents, and intermediate insect hosts might maintain Protospirura muricola and Subulura sp., and indigenous monkey...
Article
In socially tolerant settings, naïve individuals may have opportunities to interact jointly with knowledgeable demonstrators and novel tasks. This process is expected to facilitate social learning. Individual experience may also be important for reinforcing and honing socially acquired behaviours. We examined the role of joint interaction and indiv...
Article
Full-text available
The chimpanzee pinworm, Enterobius (Enterobius) anthropopitheci (Gedoelst, 1916) (Nematoda: Oxyuridae), is redescribed based on light and scanning electron microscopy of both sexes collected from the feces of chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, of an introduced population on Rubondo Island, Tanzania. Enterobius (E.) anthropopitheci is characterized by ha...
Article
Full-text available
In socially tolerant settings, na€ ıve individuals may have opportunities to interact jointly with knowledgeable demonstrators and novel tasks. This process is expected to facilitate social learning. Individual experience may also be important for reinforcing and honing socially acquired behaviours. We examined the role of joint interaction and ind...

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Project (1)
Project
Research infrastructures (RI) play a key role in identifying levers that can be used to attain the goals of the Green Deal and the “Farm to Fork” strategy, to which PIGWEB can contribute by a “From Pig to Pork” approach. The aims of PIGWEB are to strengthen the pig research community by providing and facilitating access to RI, reinforce a culture of cooperation between the research community and industrial and societal stakeholders, and improve and integrate the services provided by the RI. This will contribute to develop innovative and ethical solutions for sustainable pig production systems. To attain these aims, the project will: - Ensure easy and transparent access to experimental pig RI and associated laboratories. - Create a community of pig RI by mapping installations beyond partners of the project and identifying future research needs in pig production sector. - Harmonise protocols, best practices, and promote the use of standards to ensure high level of expertise and ethics. - Organise the collection, management, and accessibility of data generated by the project. - Ensure dissemination, exploitation, and technology transfer of results generated by the project. - Provide graduate and post-graduate training opportunities to young researchers to ensure the succession of a new generation of highly-trained experts in the fields of pig production. - Develop non- or minimally invasive methods for digestion studies and blood sampling to replace current procedures requiring surgery and invasive sampling, isolation, fixation and/or spatial restrictions of pigs. - Develop novel methods, tools and technologies that provide indicators of welfare, behaviour, and body composition. - Develop a research toolbox (based data obtained through non- or minimally