Lisieux Fuzessy

Lisieux Fuzessy
CREAF Centre for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications | CREAF

PhD
Marie Skłodowska-Curie postdoc fellow

About

61
Publications
14,283
Reads
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387
Citations
Introduction
Species diversity loss driven by habitat modification alter ecosystem functioning, reduce stability, and thus impact long-term sustainability of ecosystem services. By using a multidisciplinary approach, here I ask why certain species are better prepared to respond to environmental changes than others, and how the spatiotemporal variation in responses to habitat change alters the structure of bird communities in terms of functional and phylogenetic diversity.
Additional affiliations
July 2021 - present
CREAF Centre for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2019 - December 2019
Estación Biológica de Doñana
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Hyper-diverse seed dispersal networks in the Brazilian Atlantic forest. The dataset is based on plant-frugivore interaction records for two pristine areas in São Paulo state: Parque Estadual Intervales (PEI) and Parque Estadual Carlos Botelho (PECB).
September 2017 - June 2021
São Paulo State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (61)
Article
To define the chances of a dispersed seed to produce a new recruit, it is essential to consider all stages of the dispersal process. Howler monkeys are recognized to have positive impacts on forest regeneration, acting as primary dispersers. Furthermore, dung beetles attracted to their feces protect the seeds against predators, and provide a better...
Article
Full-text available
Seed dispersal benefits plants and frugivores, and potentially drives co-evolution, with consequences to diversification evidenced for, e.g., primates. Evidence for macro-coevolutionary patterns in multi-specific, plant-animal mutualisms is scarce, and the mechanisms driving them remain unexplored. We tested for phylogenetic congruences in primate-...
Article
Human population growth and the activities resulting in habitat destruction are a threat to biodiversity worldwide. Despite the recognized importance of dung beetles in supporting tropical forest ecosystems, our understanding of their susceptibility to anthropogenic pressures remains limited. Previous research detailed the overall consequences of h...
Article
Full-text available
Seed dispersal distance (SDD) is a vital component of vertebrate-mediated seed dispersal process: the average distance at which seeds are deposited away from the parent plant represents the starting template of plant regeneration. We present a simple model to explain and predict observed measures of average dispersal distance and we hypothesize tha...
Article
Disentangling the structure of plant–animal mutualisms shed light on how species are organized, and allow us to infer about resilience, specificity, and ultimately the consequences of the loss of functions to the ecosystem. Here we gathered fruit–frugivore interactions for all the major vertebrate taxa interacting with plants in two conservation st...
Article
Full-text available
Brazil experienced the largest socioenvironmental catastrophe of its history, caused by a tailings dam failure, known as “Mariana disaster”. The wave of iron-mining waste buried villages, contaminated the Doce River, and left an immense ocean plume. The Doce River watershed is the largest in southeast Brazil, and located in the Atlantic Forest doma...
Article
Global anthropogenic changes cause major impacts on species interactions, with cascading effects on ecosystem functioning. Animal-mediated pollination and seed dispersal are major mutualisms associated with distinct stages of plant reproduction. Nevertheless, we lack an integrated assessment on how multiple anthropogenic impacts affect these interr...
Preprint
Seed dispersal, by entailing multiple benefits to plants and frugivores, potential drives trait evolution and species diversification. Frugivory and seed dispersal shaped the coevolution of interacting clades, with consequences to speciation and diversification evidenced for e.g., primates. Evidences for macro-coevolutionary patterns in multi-speci...
Article
Questions Environmental filters limit the set of potentially coexisting species in plant communities. Paradoxically, some of the world's most biodiverse communities are subjected to strong abiotic filters. We explored how environmental heterogeneity provides conditions for niche segregation in a harsh megadiverse ecosystem, focusing on fine‐scale f...
Article
Full-text available
As humanity continues to alter the environment extensively, comprehending the effect of anthropogenic disturbances on the health, survival, and fitness of wildlife is a crucial question of conservation biology. Many primate populations occupy sub-optimal habitats prone to diverse anthropogenic disturbances that may be sources of acute and chronic s...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims Much of our understanding of the ecology and evolution of seed dispersal in the Neotropics is founded on studies involving the animal-dispersed, hyper-diverse plant clade Miconia (Melastomataceae). Nonetheless, no formal attempt has been made to establish its relevance as a model system or indeed provide evidence of the role of...
Article
Primates are great fruit consumers and disperse intact seeds from most of the plants they consume, but effective seed dispersal depends, amongst other factors, on handling behavior. Likewise, the treatment in gut and mouth may alter seed fate. Overall, frugivore and folivore-frugivore primates are recognized to provide beneficial gut treatment for...
Poster
Full-text available
Identifying the impact of anthropogenic disturbances on the health, survival, and well-being of species has become a key question of conservation biology. Many primate species are forest-dependent, making them particularly vulnerable to habitat change and excellent ecological indicators in tropical ecosystems. Before affecting primates at a populat...
Conference Paper
Identifying the impact of anthropogenic disturbances on the health, survival, and well-being of species has become a key question of conservation biology. Many primate species are forest-dependent, making them particularly vulnerable to habitat change and excellent ecological indicators in tropical ecosystems. Before affecting primates at a populat...
Chapter
Perturbações antrópicas são associadas a efeitos deletérios sobre a biodiversidade e se aplicam de diferentemente sobre os grupos biológicos. O tipo de efeito e a intensidade variam, podendo beneficiar determinados grupos, como as formigas cortadeiras (Atta sp.). Dada sua importância nos ecossistemas em que ocorrem e a escassez de estudos em flores...
Chapter
As interações ecológicas têm um papel fundamental na estrutura e composição das comunidades. As espécies da tribo Attini, especialmente o gênero Atta tem a capacidade de alterar o ambiente, principalmente a comunidade de plantas, devido ao seu papel de engenheiras do ecossistema. Elas podem modificar a comunidade de plantas devido à sua atividade d...
Poster
Full-text available
http://www.newphytologist.org/img/upload/files/43rd%20NPS%20Abstract%20Book.pdf
Article
Full-text available
Primates play an important role in ecosystem functioning and offer critical insights into human evolution, biology, behavior, and emerging infectious diseases. There are 26 primate species in the Atlantic Forests of South America, 19 of them endemic. We compiled a dataset of 5,472 georeferenced locations of 26 native and 1 introduced primate specie...
Article
Large vertebrates are important elements of mutualistic interactions and provide positive impacts on plant population and community dynamics. Despite the increasing interest on vertebrate frugivory we are still not able to disentangle their real contribution of seed dispersal to Neotropical forest functioning. Consuming fruits does not imply effect...
Article
Full-text available
Primates play an important role in ecosystem functioning and offer critical insights into human evolution, biology, behavior, and emerging infectious diseases. There are 26 primate species in the Atlantic Forests of South America, 19 of them endemic. We compiled a dataset of 5,472 georeferenced locations of 26 native and 1 introduced primate specie...
Data
Experimental setup for assessment of diaspore removal in the field. A, B—Sampling blocks comprising two tracking stations close to each other, one with diaspore piles accessible to ants and vertebrates (open) and the other accessible exclusively to ants (caged); Wire exclosure cages with seed (C) and fruit piles (D); E—Wire cage structure without m...
Data
Overview of the study site and plant species. A, B—Study site encompassing campo rupestre vegetation; C—Miconia irwinii treelet; D—Ripe fruits; E, F—Fruits with fleshy pulp partially eaten by birds. (PDF)
Data
Data from “Handling by avian frugivores affects diaspore secondary removal”. (XLSX)
Data
Birds acting as primary seed dispersers of Miconia irwinii at Serra do Cipó, Brazil. The Cinnamon Tanager (Schistochlamys ruficapillus) (A) and the Black-throated Saltator (Saltatricula atricollis) (B) feeding on M. irwinii fruits, pulp-free seeds stuck to the birds’ bills in detail; the Rufous-collared Sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis) (C), the Plain...
Data
Ground-dwelling fauna recorded during diaspore removal experiments. A—The Brazilian Guinea Pig (Cavia aperea), its feces and footprints found on a tracking station with missing pulp-free seeds (B); The lizards Tropidurus montanus (C), Eurolophosaurus nanuzae (D) and Ameivula cipoensis (E) were frequently recorded near tracking stations; F—The ant C...
Data
The ant Camponotus rufipes as a secondary seed disperser of Miconia irwinii. Edited by AJA. (MP4)
Data
Traps installed to intercept diaspores falling beneath the crown of Miconia irwinii. A, B, C—Fruiting individuals of M. irwinii with diaspore traps; D—Detail of a diaspore trap made with filter paper attached to wire circles; E—A twine coated with sticky barrier in detail; F—The Chalk-browed Mockingbird (Mimus saturninus) feeding on M. irwinii frui...
Data
S2 Fig. Traps installed to intercept diaspores falling beneath the crown of Miconia irwinii. A, B, C - Fruiting individuals of M. irwinii with diaspore traps; D - Detail of a diaspore trap made with filter paper attached to wire circles; E - A twine coated with sticky barrier in detail; F - The Chalk-browed Mockingbird (Mimus saturninus) feeding on...
Data
S1 Fig. Overview of the study site and plant species. A, B - Study site encompassing campo rupestre vegetation; C - Miconia irwinii treelet; D - Ripe fruits; E, F - Fruits with fleshy pulp partially eaten by birds.
Data
S4 Fig. Birds acting as primary seed dispersers of Miconia irwinii at Serra do Cipó, Brazil. The Cinnamon Tanager (Schistochlamys ruficapillus) (A) and the Black-throated Saltator (Saltatricula atricollis) (B) feeding on M. irwinii fruits, pulp-free seeds stuck to the birds’ bills in detail; the Rufous-collared Sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis) (C), t...
Data
S1 Film. The ant Camponotus rufipes as a secondary seed disperser of Miconia irwinii. Edited by André Jardin Arruda.
Data
S3 Fig. Experimental setup for assessment of diaspore removal in the field. A, B - Sampling blocks comprising two tracking stations close to each other, one with diaspore piles accessible to ants and vertebrates (open) and the other accessible exclusively to ants (caged); Wire exclosure cages with seed (C) and fruit piles (D); E - Wire cage structu...
Data
S5 Fig. Ground-dwelling fauna recorded during diaspore removal experiments. A - The Brazilian Guinea Pig (Cavia aperea), its feces and footprints found on a tracking station with missing pulp-free seeds (B); The lizards Tropidurus montanus (C), Eurolophosaurus nanuzae (D) and Ameivula cipoensis (E) were frequently recorded near tracking stations; F...
Article
Full-text available
The balance between the costs and benefits of fleshy fruit production depends on the feeding behavior of their seed dispersers, which might effectively disperse seeds to farther areas or drop beneath parent plants some diaspores they handle during frugivory bouts. Nevertheless, the consequences of variation in fruit handling by primary seed dispers...
Article
Full-text available
Rapid Morphological Changes (RMCs) in rodents has been frequently documented. However, relation between RMCs and potential environmental drivers has been understudied. Here, we utilized a museum collection of four rodent species, collected in the same Atlantic Forest fragment, to investigate variation in the skull morphology over time, and test the...
Article
Full-text available
Ex situ seed conservation is an effective strategy to help safeguarding plants from extinction. The updated Global Strategy for Plant Conservation's (GSPC) Target 8 aims to include 75% of threatened plant species in ex situ collections by 2020, preferably in the country of origin. Halfway through the updated GSPC program, we evaluate the current st...
Article
Biotic seed dispersal is a key process maintaining biodiversity in tropical forests where most trees produce vertebrate-dispersed seeds. Existing meta-analyses suggest an overall positive effect of vertebrate gut passage on seed germination, but no significant effects for non-flying mammals. However, previous meta-analyses combined rodents (seed pr...
Article
Previous studies have shown a nonrandom pattern of ovule fate probabilities according to ovule position in legume pods. Here, we tested how ovule position within the pods of two Fabaceae affects its fate. We expected higher proportion of well-formed seeds near the fruit tips and of unfertilized and aborted ovules near fruit bases. We collected pods...
Article
Full-text available
Animal hybridization is well documented, but evolutionary outcomes and conservation priorities often differ for natural and anthropogenic hybrids. Among primates, an order with many endangered species, the two contexts can be hard to disentangle from one another, which carries important conservation implications. Callithrix marmosets give us a uniq...
Article
Hybridization is continually documented in primates, but effects of natural and anthropogenic hybridization on biodiversity are still unclear and differ-entiating between these contexts remains challenging in regards to primate evolution and conservation. Here, we examine hybridization effects on the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of Call...
Article
This paper aims to describe the hematological and biochemical values of wild hybrid marmoset (Callithrix penicillata and C. geoffroyi) found in a forest zone of Southeastern Brazil. The marmosets were anaesthetized using ketamine and xylazine hydrochloride. Blood samples (0.5-1mL) were collected through the venipuncture of the femoral vein. Hematol...
Article
Evolutionary theory and observation predict wider phenotypic variation in hybrids than parental species. Emergent phenotypic novelty in hybrids may in turn drive new adaptations or speciation by breaking parental phenotypic constraints. Primate hybridization is often documented through genetic evidence, but knowledge about the primate hybrid phenot...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this study was to identify the helminth fauna in hybrid, non-native marmosets, through analysis of fecal samples. The study involved 51 marmosets (genus Callithrix) from five groups living in places with levels of human impact in Viçosa-MG. The marmosets were caught using a multiple-entrance trap and were anaesthetized. Feces were...

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Habitat fragmentation is one of the major threats hanging over primate populations in South America. Before affecting primates at a population level, environmental perturbations affect the physiology of the individuals. Glucocorticoids (GCs), often referred to as stress hormones, are metabolic hormones which mediate the energetic demands needed to overcome predictable and unpredictable environmental and social challenges. These physiological biomarkers play a key role in enabling individuals to respond to stressors and restore physiological homeostasis. How primates adapt to habitat fragmentation pressures remains poorly understood. The aim of my PhD research is to investigate the physiological and behavioural responses of the endangered black lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysopygus) living in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, a habitat particularly affected by fragmentation. The three specific objectives of this research are: (1) reviewing the effect of anthropogenic habitat disturbance on the well-being of primates, (2) analysing variation in chronic stress of tamarins in different forest fragment quality, and (3) relating transient stress levels to behavioural patterns. Evaluating stress levels in primate populations living in fragmented landscapes can shed light on how primates respond to such habitat perturbations and how significant it is for their survival.
Project
The effectiveness of a disperser is defined by the contribution to plant fitness and is influenced by the number of seeds removed, distance traveled from the source, germination effects and post dispersal seed fate. Post-dispersal effects at the deposition site, such as predation, removal rates and the chances of seedling survival and recruitment, define the real role played by a vertebrate as a disperser. Primate seed dispersal have a potential impact on regeneration of the Atlantic Forest and community dynamics, and the service offered varies according to functional groups in terms of primate feeding guild. However, documenting primates as effective seed dispersers remains difficult because of knowledge gaps on seed fate after primary dispersal. Thus, we aim to firstly evaluate the effects of primate feeding guilds on post-dispersal seed fate, taking the influence of the deposition site into account. We will carry out experimental designs in Carlos Botelho State Park to test whether the influence of the seed deposition patterns, the composition and the amount of feces affect interactions with seed predators and secondary dispersers, also considering the negative effect of the conspecific. The conclusions will allow us to guide future directions of conservation efforts based on ecosystem services offered by primates in terms of seed dispersal.
Project
Callithrix marmosets give us an unique glimpse of hybridization effects under distinct natural and human-altered landscapes. During this past project, we examined genetic diversity, pelage, morphometric variation and blood count of Brazilian marmoset species and their hybrids. We contribute to the understanding of the diversity of hybrid traits by examining metric and non-metric variation within the recently diverged and widely hybridizing Callithrix marmoset genus.