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Lisa Noelle Cooper

Lisa Noelle Cooper
Northeast Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, Ohio, United States · Anatomy and Neurobiology

29.97
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Ph.D.
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Research items (44)
Article
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Vespertilionid bats (Mammalia: Order Chiroptera) live 3±10 times longer than other mammals of an equivalent body size. At present, nothing is known of how bat fecal metabolic profiles shift with age in any taxa. This study established the feasibility of using a non-invasive, fecal metabolomics approach to examine age-related differences in the feca...
Article
Low bone mineral density (BMD) is a significant comorbidity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may reflect systemic regulatory pathway dysfunction. Low BMD has been identified in several AD mouse models selective for amyloid-β or tau pathology, but these deficits were attributed to diverse mechanisms. In this study, we identified common pathophysiolog...
Article
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Cetaceans are the only mammals to have evolved hyperphalangy, an increase in the number of phalanges beyond the mammalian plesiomorphic condition of three phalanges per digit. In this study, cetaceans were used as a novel model to review previous studies of mammalian hyperphalangy and contribute new experimental evidence as to the molecular origins...
Article
The earliest cetaceans were interpreted as semi-aquatic based on the presence of thickened bones and stable oxygen isotopes in tooth enamel. However, the origin of aquatic behaviors in cetacean relatives (e.g., raoellids, anthracotheres) remains unclear. This study reconstructs the origins of aquatic behaviors based on long bone microanatomy and st...
Article
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Osteoprogenitor cells contribute to the development and maintenance of skeletal tissues. Bats are unique model taxa whose cellular processes are poorly understood, especially in regards to skeletal biology. Forelimb bones of bats, unlike those of terrestrial mammals, bend during flight and function in controlled deformation. As a first step towards...
Article
The field of evolutionary developmental biology is broadly focused on identifying the genetic and developmental mechanisms underlying morphological diversity. Connecting the genotype with the phenotype means that evo-devo research often considers a wide range of evidence, from genetics and morphology to fossils. In this commentary, we provide an ov...
Article
There are numerous records of conjoined twinning in humans and domesticated animals, but many fewer for wild animals because of the early death of conjoined twins. We here describe the incidental discovery and skeletal anatomy of a wild-caught bat fetus with two heads. To our knowledge, this is only the second conjoined bat fetus described, and the...
Article
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Two bat families, the leaf-nosed (Phyllostomidae) and fruit bats (Pteropodidae), have independently evolved the ability to consume plant resources. However, despite their similar ages, species richness and the strong selective pressures placed on the evolution of skull shape by plant-based foods, phyllostomids display more craniofacial diversity th...
Article
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Anthracobunidae is an Eocene family of large mammals from south Asia that is commonly considered to be part of the radiation that gave rise to elephants (proboscideans) and sea cows (sirenians). We describe a new collection of anthracobunid fossils from Middle Eocene rocks of Indo-Pakistan that more than doubles the number of known anthracobunid fo...
Chapter
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During the Eocene epoch, archaic cetaceans made the land-to-sea transition, giving rise to modern whales, dolphins, and porpoises. During this transition, the feeding apparatus of fossil remingtonocetines displayed morphologies that are distinct from other cetaceans, confounding straightforward interpretations of their feeding behaviors. This study...
Chapter
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The earliest bats underwent an extraordinary limb-to-wing transition during their evolutionary history and successfully colonized the aerial habitat. Unfortunately, the bat fossil record lacks transitional fossils documenting this event, thereby challenging scientists to reconstruct these changes in their body plan based on the molecular and morpho...
Article
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Paleontology provides information about the history of morphological transformations, whereas developmental biology provides information about how such transformations happen at a mechanistic level. As such, developmental evidence enriches paleontology in formulating and assessing hypotheses of homology, character definition, and character independ...
Article
Mammals have evolved a stunning diversity of limb morphologies (e.g., wings, flippers, hands, and paws) that allowed access to a wide range of habitats. Over 50 million years ago, bats (Order Chiroptera) evolved a wing (composed of a thin membrane encasing long digits) and thereby achieved powered flight. Unfortunately, the fossil record currently...
Data
Mammals have evolved a stunning diversity of limb morphologies (e.g., wings, flippers, hands, and paws) that allowed access to a wide range of habitats. Over 50 million years ago, bats (Order Chiroptera) evolved a wing (composed of a thin membrane encasing long digits) and thereby achieved powered flight. Unfortunately, the fossil record currently...
Article
Digit reduction has occurred in parallel in many mammalian lineages. However, despite this pattern's prevalence, the developmental mechanisms underlying mammalian digit reduction remain controversial. We therefore undertook a study of digit development in the pig (Sus scrofa), a mammal with reduced first, second, and fifth digits. Our results indic...
Article
Raoellids are small, raccoon-sized Eocene artiodactyls, closely related to archaic cetaceans (archaeocetes) that have poor representation of postcranial elements in the fossil record. Little is known of the aquatic and terrestrial locomotor affinities of raoellids due to the paucity of their fossil record, leaving a critical gap in our understandin...
Article
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The Paleogene vertebrate fossil record of Nigeria has until recently been limited to marine deposits in the Eocene-age Ameki Formation. New work in the Imo Formation of southeastern Nigeria has revealed a diverse ichthyofauna of Paleocene age. The Imo Formation overlies the Nsukka Formation, and underlies the Ameki Formation. The uppermost bone-bea...
Article
Marine mammals are descended from terrestrial mammals whose forelimbs were weight-bearing appendages specialized for terrestrial locomotion. In the transition to an aquatic lifestyle, most marine mammals evolved a flipper by encasing the forelimb in soft tissue. Most living marine mammals have a flipper, and flipper shape and the morphology of the...
Article
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Two new species of fossil cetaceans (Pakicetus calcis and Pakicetus chittas) are described from a new locality in the Kuldana Formation (Lutetian, middle Eocene) of the Kala Chitta Hills in Northern Pakistan. Additional dentitions of the pakicetid Nalacetus ratimitus, the remingtonocetid Attockicetus, and additional dental material of the holotype...
Article
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Cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) are an order of mammals that originated about 50 million years ago in the Eocene epoch. Even though all modern cetaceans are obligate aquatic mammals, early cetaceans were amphibious, and their ancestors were terrestrial artiodactyls, similar to small deer. The transition from land to water is documented...
Article
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Heterochrony, the change in timing of developmental processes, is thought to be a key process shaping the numerous limb morphologies of tetrapods. Through a delayed offset in digit development, all cetaceans (i.e., whales, dolphins, and porpoises) have evolved supernumary phalanges (hyperphalangy). Moreover, some toothed cetaceans further alter dig...
Article
The forelimbs of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) are unique among mammals as the digits exhibit hyperphalangy, and the entire limb is encased in a soft tissue flipper that functions to generate lift. The typical morphology of cetacean digits has been well documented by detailed anatomical studies. This study however furthers our underst...
Article
Replying to: J. H. Geisler & J. M. Theodor Nature 458, 10.1038/nature07776 (2009)
Data
We report the occurrence of a mammalian lumbar vertebra and several associated fish teeth from Dillai Parbat, in the southeastern part of the Mikir Hills of Assam, in northeastern India. The specimens were recovered from a shallow marine limestone unit of upper middle Eocene age (40-37 Ma). The vertebra is tentatively described as that of an archae...
Article
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Hadrosaurs grew rapidly, and quantifying their growth is key to understanding life-history interactions between predators and prey during the Late Cretaceous. In this study, we longitudinally sampled a sequence of lines of arrested growth (LAGs) from an essentially full-grown hadrosaur Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (MOR 549). Spatial locations of LAGs i...
Article
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Minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) are the smallest member of balaenopterid whales and little is known of their kinematics during feeding maneuvers. These whales have narrow and elongated flippers that are small relative to body size compared to related species such as right and gray whales. No experimental studies have addressed the hydrody...
Article
Full-text available
Although the first ten million years of whale evolution are documented by a remarkable series of fossil skeletons, the link to the ancestor of cetaceans has been missing. It was known that whales are related to even-toed ungulates (artiodactyls), but until now no artiodactyls were morphologically close to early whales. Here we show that the Eocene...
Article
The forelimb of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) has been radically modified during the limb-to-flipper transition. Extant cetaceans have a soft tissue flipper encasing the manus and acting as a hydrofoil to generate lift. The neuromuscular anatomy that controls flipper movement, however, is poorly understood. This study documents flippe...
Article
Cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) have a soft tissue flipper that encases most of the forelimb, and elongated digits with an increased number of phalanges (hyperphalangy). In addition, some cetaceans exhibit a reduction in digit number. Although toothed cetaceans (odontocetes) are pentadactylous, most baleen whales (mysticetes) are tetrad...
Article
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Thesis (M.S.)--San Diego State University, 2004. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 106-115).