Lisa Jaremka

Lisa Jaremka
University of Delaware | UDel UD · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

55
Publications
48,861
Reads
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2,121
Citations
Citations since 2017
27 Research Items
1603 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
Additional affiliations
July 2011 - July 2014
The Ohio State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
The death of a spouse is associated with maladaptive immune alterations; grief severity may exacerbate this link. We investigated whether high grief symptoms were associated with an amplified inflammatory response to subsequent stress among 111 recently bereaved older adults. Participants completed a standardized psychological stressor and underwen...
Article
The COVID‐19 pandemic, an external stressor with multiple stressful sequelae, has fundamentally changed people's lives over multiple years. In this article, we first review research demonstrating that the pandemic has negatively impacted people's sense of belonging and health over time. Next, we draw upon decades of theoretical and empirical work d...
Article
Full-text available
The social-signal-transduction theory of depression asserts that people who experience ongoing interpersonal stressors and mount a greater inflammatory response to social stress are at higher risk for depression. The current study tested this theory in two adult samples. In Study 1, physically healthy adults ( N = 76) who reported more frequent int...
Article
Full-text available
PurposeLeptin influences inflammation and tumor growth and leptin signaling is often dysregulated among obese breast cancer survivors. This leads to a lack of satiety and, ultimately, risk for further weight gain. Breast cancer survivors also experience high rates of depression and anxiety, which are linked to leptin production. This study examined...
Article
According to extensive evidence, we-talk—couples’ use of first-person, plural pronouns—predicts better relationship quality and well-being. However, prior work has not distinguished we-talk by its context, which varies widely across studies. Also, little is known about we-talk’s consistency over time. To assess the stability and correlates of we-ta...
Article
Poor quality romantic relationships increase risk for health problems; elevated systemic inflammation is one promising underlying mechanism. This registered report utilized data from three publicly available data sets with large sample sizes (Add Health, MIDUS, NSHAP) to test this possibility. An internal meta‐analysis across all three studies dete...
Article
Spouses share common risks for cardiometabolic diseases: a person’s diabetes or hypertension raises the partner’s odds of developing the same condition. The mechanisms responsible for this disease concordance remain poorly understood. To examine three factors that may modulate partners’ cardiometabolic similarity—closeness, hostile marital behavior...
Article
Academic life is full of learning, excitement, and discovery. However, academics also experience professional challenges at various points in their career, including repeated rejection, impostor syndrome, and burnout. These negative experiences are rarely talked about publicly, creating a sense of loneliness and isolation for people who presume the...
Article
Full-text available
Spouses share age-related disease risks: a person’s diabetes or hypertension raises the partner’s odds for the same condition. To probe the importance of partners’ closeness, marital satisfaction, and age for spouses’ similarity in cardiometabolic health, 43 disease-free couples ages 24-61 provided fasting glucose, fat and carbohydrate oxidation, a...
Article
Responses to interpersonal rejection vary widely in form and function. Existing theories of interpersonal rejection have exclusively focused on organizing these responses on a single antisocial–prosocial dimension. Accumulating evidence suggests a gap in this approach: Variability in social responses to rejection cannot solely be explained by the a...
Article
Background: Obesity is a well-known risk factor for elevated inflammation and insulin resistance. Social anxiety may moderate this relationship, such that individuals who areboth obese and socially anxious may have an even greater risk for elevated inflammation and insulin resistance than those who are obese but not socially anxious; the combinati...
Preprint
Full-text available
Interpersonal responses to social rejection vary widely in form and function. Existing theories of social rejection have exclusively focused on organizing these responses on a single antisocial–prosocial dimension. Accumulating evidence suggests a gap in this approach: variability in social responses to rejection cannot solely be explained by the a...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose of review: The first goal of this review is to discuss the evidence linking belonging threats to immune function and food intake. The second goal is to evaluate whether the links among belonging threats, immune function, and eating behavior differ based on gender. Recent findings: Threats to belonging are linked to elevated herpesvirus a...
Article
Background: Marital distress and depression work in tandem to escalate risks for inflammation-related disorders. Translocation of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) from the gut microbiota to blood circulation stimulates systemic inflammatory responses. Methods: To investigate increased gut permeability (a "leaky gut") as one potentia...
Article
Full-text available
Historically, one of the biggest paradoxes in the rejection literature was that rejected people sometimes behaved antisocially and at other times prosocially. Researchers responded to this paradox by demonstrating that the prospect of fulfilling belonging predicted these varied responses. A close inspection of the foundational studies, however, rev...
Article
Hostile conflict in marriage can increase risks for disease and mortality. Physiological synchrony between partners-e.g., the linkage between their autonomic fluctuations-appears to capture engagement, or an inability to disengage from an exchange, and thus may amplify the health risks of noxious interactions such as marital conflict. Prior work ha...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose of review This review summarizes research linking loneliness and low perceived social support, two threats to belonging, to mental and physical health among breast cancer survivors. We also highlight similarities with research using non-cancer populations. Recent findings Loneliness and low perceived social support are common complaints am...
Article
Human beings have an innate need to form caring social bonds and be loved by others. Thwarting this basic human need should have negative health consequences. This article begins by reviewing empirical evidence linking belonging threats to concrete health outcomes and medical conditions. Next, alterations in immune function and appetite regulation...
Article
An unhappy marriage increases disease and mortality risks. Discordant couples exhibit stronger links to their partner’s autonomic fluctuations–that is, stronger covariation–than do satisfied couples, but whether this physiological signature plays a role in marriage’s health effects is unknown. To examine associations between couples’ heart rate var...
Article
Objective: Loneliness is a well-established risk factor for poor physical health. Much less is known about how loneliness affects patient-reported outcomes (PROs), such as somatic symptoms, which are increasingly important for guiding symptom management and assessing quality of patient care. The current study investigates whether (a) loneliness and...
Article
Sleep problems can boost inflammation and may jeopardize interpersonal functioning, risks that may be magnified in couples. This observational study examined the effects of self-reported recent sleep duration on couples’ inflammation, inflammatory responses to a problem discussion, interpersonal behavior, and use of emotion regulation strategies (e...
Article
Some studies have demonstrated that heavier people perceive themselves as lacking social connections, whereas others have not. The current study investigated whether eating alters the link between body mass index (BMI) and perceived social connection, providing one explanation for inconsistencies across previous studies. Participants were instructe...
Article
Researchers recently demonstrated that cortisol increases in response to mating-relevant social interactions. An important next step is investigating factors that explain individual differences in cortisol reactivity within these contexts. The current study examined demographic, situational, and individual difference predictors of cortisol reactivi...
Article
Full-text available
Distressed marriages enhance risk for health problems; appetite dysregulation is one potential mechanistic pathway. Research suggests that ghrelin and leptin, appetite-relevant hormones connected to shorter and longer-term energy balance, may differentially affect people with a higher versus lower body mass index (BMI). During this double-blind ran...
Article
Objectives Cancer survivors often report cognitive problems. Furthermore, decreases in physical activity typically occur over the course of cancer treatment. Although physical activity benefits cognitive function in noncancer populations, evidence linking physical activity to cognitive function in cancer survivors is limited. In our recent randomiz...
Article
Loneliness is strongly linked to poor health. Recent research suggests that appetite dysregulation provides one potential pathway through which loneliness and other forms of social disconnection influence health. Obesity may alter the link between loneliness and appetite-relevant hormones, one unexplored possibility. We examined the relationships b...
Article
Cancer survivors often experience cognitive difficulties after treatment completion. Although chemotherapy enhances risk for cognitive problems, it is likely only one piece of a complex puzzle that explains survivors' cognitive functioning. Loneliness may be one psychosocial risk factor. The current studies included both subjective and objective co...
Article
Attachment theory provides a framework for understanding individual differences in chronic interpersonal stress. Attachment anxiety, a type of relationship insecurity characterized by worry about rejection and abandonment, is a chronic interpersonal stressor. Stress impacts cellular immunity, including herpesvirus reactivation. We investigated whet...
Article
Objective: Loneliness enhances risk for episodic memory declines over time. Omega-3 supplementation can improve cognitive function for people experiencing mild cognitive difficulties. Accordingly, we explored whether omega-3 supplementation would attenuate loneliness-related episodic memory problems. Methods: Participants (n = 138) from a parent...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Pain, depression, and fatigue function as a symptom cluster and thus may share common risk factors. Interpersonal relationships clearly influence health, suggesting that loneliness may promote the development of the pain, depression, and fatigue symptom cluster. We hypothesized that loneliness would be related to concurrent symptom clus...
Article
Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor among women in the industrialized world. The vast majority of these tumors can now be successfully treated. A subset of breast cancer survivors report quality of life (QOL) difficulties well after treatment is completed. The current study examined how individual differences in attachment style and...
Article
Cohen et al. highlight important behavioral influences on cell aging which could have broad implications for infectious disease susceptibility.
Article
Attachment theory provides a framework for understanding individual differences in chronic interpersonal stress and may offer insight into the associations between interpersonal relationships and health. Attachment anxiety, a type of relationship insecurity characterized by worry about rejection and abandonment, is a chronic interpersonal stressor....
Article
Although evidence suggests that loneliness may increase risk for health problems, the mechanisms responsible are not well understood. Immune dysregulation is one potential pathway: Elevated proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) increase risk for health problems. In our first study (N = 134), lonelier healthy adults exposed to acute...
Article
Stress and depression consistently elevate inflammation and are often experienced simultaneously, which is exemplified by people in troubled relationships. Troubled relationships also elevate inflammation, which may be partially explained by their ability to engender high levels of stress and depression. People who are stressed, depressed, or in tr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cancer survivors often suffer from long-term health problems like cardiac dysfunction, chronic stress, fatigue, and depression. One common underlying factor for these problems is low heart-rate variability (HRV), exhibiting less variation in the time interval between heartbeats, which is also linked to all-cause mortality. Research has found that s...
Article
Full-text available
Although evidence suggests that attachment anxiety may increase risk for health problems, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not well understood. In the current study, married couples (N = 85) provided saliva samples over 3 days and blood samples on two occasions. Participants with higher attachment anxiety produced more cortisol and had f...
Article
The risk regulation model proposes that people with low self-esteem, but not those with high self-esteem, react to relationship-based self-threats by defensively distancing from their partner. In the present study, we hypothesized that a self-affirmation manipulation, by restoring self-worth and integrity for people with low self-esteem, would atte...
Article
Full-text available
Four studies examined the hypothesis that intense emotional experiences are more often centered on interdependent than independent experiences. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrated that when asked to write about emotionally intense events, participants were more likely to write about interdependent than independent experiences. Study 3 provided evidence th...
Article
Full-text available
Everyday stressors can threaten valued aspects of the self. Self-affirmation theory posits that this threat could be attenuated if individuals affirm alternative self-resources. The present study examined whether self-affirmation would buffer cumulative stress responses to an ongoing academic stressor. Undergraduate participants provided 15-hr urin...
Article
The current research proposes that thinking about friends improves feelings about the self and does so differentially depending on avoidance of intimacy. Based on previous findings that individuals who avoid intimacy in relationships (avoidant individuals) contrast their self-concepts with primed friends whereas those who pursue intimacy in relatio...
Article
Full-text available
This study explored the association between one partner's attachment style and the other partner's relationship experiences (N = 305 couples). It was hypothesized that individuals would be more satisfied in their relationship when their partners were more secure (lower in attachment avoidance and anxiety), and that this association would be mediate...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am interested in assaying Cholecystokinin (CCK) and Uroguanylin (GUCA2B) from human serum or plasma collected from peripheral blood draws. I found commercial assay kits for both. My question is whether there is any evidence that these markers provide useful information when sampled from the periphery. I believe both originate in the intestinal track, and thus may or may not actually mean anything when sampled in the periphery. Any thoughts about this ideas about where to start looking for answers?

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