Lisa A. Goodman

Lisa A. Goodman
Boston College, USA | BC · Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology Department

Ph.D.

About

153
Publications
152,444
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12,464
Citations

Publications

Publications (153)
Article
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Intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors seeking safety and justice for themselves and their children through family court and other legal systems may instead encounter their partners’ misuse of court processes to further enact coercive control. To illuminate this harmful process, this study sought to create a measure of legal abuse. We developed...
Article
Women are at increased risk for experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) in the context of disasters. However, the factors that increase this risk are not well understood. The purpose of the current study was to systematically review the literature on IPV in the context of disasters. The first aim was to identify risk factors predicting women’s...
Article
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The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a study that draws upon a collaborative research strategy and has two main objectives: 1) Translating and adapting into French the Measure of Victim Empowerment Related to Safety (MOVERS scale) (Goodman et al. Psychology of Violence, 5(4), 355-366, 2015a); 2) Validating the French version of th...
Article
Half of today's domestic violence (DV) advocates are survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) or other forms of abuse. Yet, little is known about the experiences of those who are both survivors and advocates, especially regarding organizational relationships, policies, and culture, and how these factors shape well-being. This grounded theory st...
Article
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The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically highlighted the isolation of domestic violence survivors, triggering media coverage and innovative efforts to reach out to those who are trapped in their homes, facing greater danger from their partners than from the virus. But another harmful aspect of this difficult time has received far less attention: surv...
Article
Antidomestic violence advocates have begun to question two essential policies that have long defined domestic violence shelters—strict secrecy regarding shelter location and prohibitions on shelter access to all except staff and residents—both of which serve to increase survivors’ social isolation and entail coercive rules that resonate painfully w...
Article
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In the domestic violence field, a survivor-centered approach to services is a shared ideal, but there is little empirical work demonstrating its importance. This study filled that gap, focusing on a key outcome—safety-related empowerment. We gathered data from 177 intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors seeking community-based services, and after...
Article
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This qualitative descriptive study examines the perspectives of 19 mothers who survived intimate partner violence (IPV) and sought custody of one or more children through the family court system. We explored these mothers’ perceptions of the nature of court processes from start to finish, their understandings of the impact of court processes and ou...
Article
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Domestic violence (DV) advocates aim to restore survivors’ choice and control, a process that involves sharing power with survivors, to the extent possible. At the same time, as mandated reporters, they are legally required to observe, evaluate, and potentially report survivors’ parenting to the Department of Children and Families (DCF), an activit...
Article
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For survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV), the act of seeking help from a domestic violence (DV) shelter can incur enormous costs. One cost is what we refer to as “parenting surveillance:” that is, DV advocates can monitor, evaluate, and sometimes control survivors’ parenting—activities given weight through their mandated reporter role. Alth...
Article
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When intimate partner violence survivors seek help from public institutions, including domestic violence programs, they necessarily submit to the scrutiny of staff who are required to report suspicions of child abuse or neglect to the state child protective system. This prospect would frighten anyone but has particular weight for survivor-parents w...
Article
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Survivors of intimate partner violence arrive at the doors of domestic violence (DV) programs with a wide variety of needs, including long-term safety and healing, housing, economic stability, health and well-being, and community connection. Although some DV programs offer holistic approaches to survivors, many focus the vast majority of their atte...
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Despite high rates of mental health difficulties, low-income individuals are less likely to access mental health services and show fewer improvements when they do compared to middle-income clients (Falconnier, 2009). A handful of studies have shown, however, that when interventions are altered to address poverty-related stressors, they become more...
Experiment Findings
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This infographic summarized the results of the Identity Abuse Project. A great educational tool for mental health trainees or DV Staff
Article
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Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a methodological approach where community–academic teams build equitable relationships throughout the research process. In the domestic violence (DV) field, CBPR may be particularly important when conducting research with racial and ethnic minority DV survivors, as this group faces concurrent oppress...
Article
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The Domestic Violence Program Evaluation and Research Collaborative (DVPERC) was formed in Massachusetts in 2011 as an effort to connect research and practice. Initially, we consisted of a few programs and researchers, but we quickly evolved into a regional collaboration spanning several states. From the outset, we have followed community-based par...
Article
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Identity abuse (IA) comprises a set of abuse tactics that exploit discriminatory systems including homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia (Tesch & Berkerian, 2015). This study examined the factorial validity of the IA Scale (Woulfe & Goodman, 2018) with a large independent sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals....
Article
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Intimate partner violence (IPV; i.e., physical, sexual, or psychological abuse by a current or former partner) remains a public health concern with devastating personal and societal costs. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals are also vulnerable to a dimension of IPV called identity abuse (IA); that is, abuse tactics t...
Article
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Objectives: Community-based research is a broad approach in which researchers work closely with practitioners and community members to enhance the understanding of a given phenomenon and promote positive outcomes. In the domestic violence (DV) field, community-based research is a particularly useful strategy to develop and evaluate interventions th...
Article
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In the absence of ongoing involvement in the communities that are the subjects of research, even well-intentioned researchers can develop questions that are not relevant to community needs, employ methods that hurt community members, or disseminate findings in ways that are inaccessible to those most affected. Recognizing these harms, a growing num...
Article
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Counseling programs across the country are increasingly incorporating social justice advocacy training into their curricula. However, much remains to be learned about the developmental processes by which students develop advocacy skills and apply those skills after they graduate. To address these questions and drive further innovation in the field...
Article
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Programs for domestic violence (DV) victims and their families have grown exponentially over the last four decades. The evidence demonstrating the extent of their effectiveness, however, often has been criticized as stemming from studies lacking scientific rigor. A core reason for this critique is the widespread belief that credible evidence can de...
Article
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Domestic violence is a potentially traumatizing experience that has devastating psychological and physical consequences. In response, domestic violence shelter programs have focused increasing attention on helping adult and child survivors understand and heal from this trauma. What have come to be called trauma-informed practices include (a) reflec...
Article
Despite a continuing need for clinicians to engage in socially-­‐just practice that addresses systemic factors impacting the mental health of clients through advocacy, there are often limited formalized opportunities for doctoral counseling psychology students to be exposed to and to engage in community or public arena advocacy. Two counseling psyc...
Article
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Spurred by research demonstrating the pervasiveness and impact of trauma, domestic violence programs are increasingly adopting a trauma-informed approach. In the absence of measurement tools, however, they are unable to determine whether indeed clients experience their practices as trauma-informed. The aim of this study was to create and validate a...
Article
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Spurred by research demonstrating the pervasiveness and impact of trauma, domestic violence programs are increasingly adopting a trauma‐informed approach. In the absence of measurement tools, however, they are unable to determine whether indeed clients experience their practices as trauma‐informed. The aim of this study was to create and validate a...
Article
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Over the last 4 decades, domestic violence (DV) programs—both residential and nonresidential—have sprung up in communities across the country with the aim of helping survivors become safe. These programs place strong emphasis on the relationship between the advocate and survivor as critical to becoming safer and healing from the trauma of abuse. Ye...
Article
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Three out of 10 women and 1 out of 10 men in the United States experience violence at the hands of an intimate partner-often with devastating costs. In response, hundreds of residential and community-based organizations have sprung up to support survivors. Over the last decade, many of these organizations have joined other human service systems in...
Article
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We examined whether risks to children of intimate partner violence survivors affected the type of legal assistance accessed. We hypothesized that the level and type of perceived child risk would be associated with whether women sought a protection order in civil court or filed charges against a current or former intimate partner in criminal court....
Article
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Despite powerful evidence that informal social support contributes to survivors' safety and well-being, mainstream domestic violence (DV) programs have not developed comprehensive models for helping isolated survivors reengage with these networks. Although many advocates use network-oriented strategies informally, they often do so without resources...
Article
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As emergency domestic violence (DV) shelters have proliferated, there has been an increase in rules that shelter residents must follow. This qualitative descriptive study explores intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors' experiences living with DV shelter rules. Five thematic clusters emerged from interviews with 11 survivors: (1) shelter environ...
Article
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Although low-income women in the United States are at elevated risk for a range of mental health difficulties, they are less likely to access mental health services and more likely to drop out prematurely than higher income women. To explain this paradox, researchers tend to emphasize practical obstacles, but attend less to how low-income women the...
Article
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A primary aim of mainstream domestic violence (DV) programs is to help survivors and their children achieve safety from intimate partner violence. That goal, however, is neither simple nor straightforward. Instead, research demonstrates that the very actions survivors take to achieve safety may trigger a wide range of negative consequences. Missing...
Article
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Although the idea of empowerment lies at the heart of the anti-domestic violence movement, consensus on the defining characteristics of this construct have remained elusive. A clear and consistent definition of empowerment would promote the development of common metrics for research and evaluation, and guide the development of best practices. In th...
Article
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Survivor-defined practice, characterized by an emphasis on client choice, partnership, and sensitivity to the unique needs, contexts, and coping strategies of individual survivors, is an aspirational goal of the domestic violence (DV) movement, assumed to be a key contributor to empowerment and other positive outcomes among survivors. Despite its c...
Article
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Counseling psychology doctoral programs across the country are working to develop new approaches to bring social justice to the curriculum. Boston College has done so, in part, through a course titled Counseling in Context. The three core emphases are (a) ongoing self-examination of power and privilege, (b) applying traditional counseling skills to...
Article
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Student learning was assessed in an innovative university-community partnership in which undergraduate students enrolled, first, in a didactic course on intimate partner violence and, subsequently, in a service-learning course where they worked with children living in a shelter for survivors of intimate partner violence. Data were collected at the...
Article
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Objective: As budgets tighten and demand grows, domestic violence (DV) programs are facing enormous pressure to demonstrate the impact of their work. A critical challenge to doing so is the absence of outcome measures that reflect DV programsa' missions and survivorsa' goals for themselves. Academic-community partnerships are critical to developing...
Article
Given the centrality of court interventions to the U.S. response to intimate partner violence (IPV), it is crucial to evaluate their impact on reabuse. To do so, this study examined whether female IPV victims’ experiences of abuse in the year following a criminal court case against their partner varied by case outcome or by whether the batterer had...
Article
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Intimate partner violence (IPV) victims often report feeling confused and uninformed about court proceedings, including even about the final disposition of the case against their partner. This is problematic because victims' decisions in responding to subsequent abuse may be significantly influenced by their beliefs about the outcomes of prior cour...
Article
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Objective: We examined 4 separate dimensions of functional social support (tangible, appraisal, self-esteem, and belonging) as predictors of change in depression over 4.5 years in a sample of women reporting intimate partner violence. Method: Participants were recruited as they sought help for violence perpetrated by a current or former male par...
Article
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Despite the high and increasing prevalence of poverty in the United States, psychologists and allied professionals have done little to develop mental health interventions that are tailored to the specific sociocultural experiences of low-income families. In this article, we describe the sociocultural stressors that accompany the material deprivatio...
Article
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Despite positive changes in responses to intimate partner violence (IPV) over the past 30 years, many obstacles to victim safety remain. Because reforms tend to be based on an inflexible one-size-fits-all approach, the justice system fails to effectively support many individual battered women, and sometimes even has a detrimental impact on their em...
Article
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Despite the many hard-won victories of the antidomestic violence movement, it has had less success in reaching one of its own primary goals: that of making intimate partner violence a problem of the community rather than a problem between two individuals. Most mainstream domestic violence service models have not prioritized ongoing engagement of su...
Article
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A large body of cross-sectional and longitudinal research demonstrates the important contribution of informal social networks to the well-being and safety of female survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). Most survivors turn to family and friends before, during, and after their involvement with formal services; and many rely solely on informa...
Article
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Although most battered women seeking formal help have some contact with court, limited research exists on what they find helpful and harmful about these experiences. Using qualitative data from low-income, largely Black battered women, this study finds that issues related to court outcomes, such as case disposition and enforcement, are important to...
Article
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Although poverty is associated with a range of mental health difficulties among women in this country, mainstream mental health interventions are not sufficient to meet the complex needs of poor women. This article argues that stress, powerlessness, and social isolation should become primary targets of our interventions, as they are key mediators o...
Article
This study describes a qualitative study of student advocates' experiences of their work with low-income women struggling with symptoms of depression. Using an advocacy model called Relationship-Centered Advocacy, these 1st-year counseling psychology graduate students worked intensively with their "partners" for 9 months. Advocate-partner teams met...
Article
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This study identified workplace factors associated with secondary traumatic stress (STS) in a sample of 148 domestic violence advocates working in diverse settings. Findings indicate that coworker support and quality clinical supervision are critical to emotional well-being and that an environment in which there is shared power-that is, respect for...
Article
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The Victim-Informed Prosecution Project (VIP) was designed to amplify the voice of the victim in the prosecution of a battering current or ex-partner through collaboration between the prosecution and victim-centered agencies. This article describes the rationale for and design and implementation of VIP and then explores whether it increased perceiv...
Article
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Until recently, the connection between intimate partner violence (IPV) and persistent poverty had been largely ignored. Recent research indicates, however, that the two phenomena cooccur at high rates; produce parallel effects; and, in each other's presence, constrain coping options. Therefore, both external situational, and internal psychological...
Article
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This article describes a qualitative study of how low-income women who are struggling with symptoms of depression experience feminist relational advocacy, a new model that is informed by feminist, multicultural, and community psychology theories. Using qualitative content analysis of participant interviews, the authors describe the processes and ou...
Article
Despite assumptions that leaving the batterer offers the best chance for improvement in battered women's lives, few studies provide conclusive data on this issue. Although many women eventually reunite with partners, also unexamined is the influence of relationship course over time. Five waves of data from 206 low-income, largely Black, help-seekin...
Article
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Research has established the connection between intimate partner violence victims' empowering experiences in the court system and their satisfaction with the process, but not between these experiences and victims' broader wellbeing, a link suggested by the framework of therapeutic jurisprudence. This study investigated the relationship between empo...
Article
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Building on a handful of studies demonstrating battered women’s accuracy in assessing their risk of being physically reabused, this study examined how accurately victims assess their risk of future psychological abuse. Participants’ ratings of the likelihood that their partner would engage in controlling/dominance behaviors or efforts to humiliate/...
Article
The impact of avoidant coping on level of PTSD symptoms over 1 year was examined among 262 women exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV) within the past month. Covariates included childhood sexual abuse (CSA), IPV severity, perceived and formal social support, and revictimization. Using longitudinal hierarchical multiple regression, avoidant cop...
Article
Current theory assumes that intimate partner violence (IPV) victims' helpseeking is a process that unfolds over time rather than a one-time event, but this assumption has never been explored with longitudinal data. This study describes the pattern of formal helpseeking efforts in a sample of 406 IPV victims over the course of a year. Further, we ex...
Article
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Much of the discourse on intimate partner violence assumes that women must end their relationship with their abusive partner to increase their safety and emotional well-being. Few studies, however, exist to support this assumption. Equally problematic, those studies that do exist have failed to distinguish women who leave and stay out from those wh...
Article
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Using four categories of accuracy (true positive, false positive, true negative, false negative), this study explored (1) how accurately intimate partner violence (IPV) victims are able to assess their risk of re-abuse; and (2) potential predictors of accuracy. Women seeking help for IPV (N = 246) rated the likelihood that they would experience phy...
Article
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Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) studies have suggested that a model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that is characterized by 4 factors is preferable to competing models. However, the composition of these 4 factors has varied across studies, with 1 model splitting avoidance and numbing symptoms (e.g., D. W. King, G. A. Leskin, L. A. King,...
Book
Listening to Battered Women: A Survivor-Centered Approach to Advocacy, Mental Health, and Justice presents an in-depth, multidisciplinary look at society's responses to domestic violence. Although substantial reforms have been made in the services available to battered women since the 1970s, the book shows how the public and private systems availab...
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Responding to calls for improved measurement in the field of domestic violence, this paper reports the development and initial validation of the Brief Coercion and Conflict Scales in a sample of incarcerated women. Confirmatory factor analyses tested the scales hypothesized structure and supported coercion and conflict as moderately and positively...
Article
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Increasing emphasis on specialization in social and mental health services leaves these systems largely unable to attend to marginalized women's complex needs, despite new models designed to ameliorate specialization's impact. In this article, the authors describe how inattention to these women's contexts leaves them ill-served and leaves programs...
Article
This prospective study examines the impact of four posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom clusters (hyperarousal, reexperiencing, numbing, and avoidance) on reabuse over 1 year among women exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). The covariates include severity of IPV, a history of childhood violence, and characteristics of the abusive rel...
Article
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This qualitative study explored how the cultural context of intimate partner violence affected accessibility to mainstream services for one immigrant group: Haitian women. Analysis of the data revealed two major themes. First, the nature and context of intimate partner violence in the Haitian immigrant community contribute to Haitian women's reluct...
Article
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Battered women experience different constellations of violence and abusive behavior characterized by various combinations of physical violence, sexual violence, psychological abuse, and stalking. The goals of the current study were to determine whether it was possible to identify empirically derived and meaningful patterns of intimate partner viole...