Line Cottegnies

Line Cottegnies
Sorbonne Université | UPMC · Département d'Etudes anglophones

Ph.D, M.A., Agrégation

About

72
Publications
2,204
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47
Citations
Citations since 2017
18 Research Items
38 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230246810
20172018201920202021202220230246810
20172018201920202021202220230246810
Introduction
Line Cottegnies currently works at Sorbonne Université. Her current research is on the Douai manuscript and on Aphra Behn's translations from the French. Her most recent publication is a critical edition (with Marie-Alice Belle) of Mary SIdney Herbert's "Antonius" and Thomas Kyd's "Cornelia", published in in the MHRA Tudor and Stuart Translation Series as "Robert Garnier in Elizabethan England" (2017).
Additional affiliations
September 2013 - March 2017
Sorbonne Université
Position
  • Professor
September 2003 - August 2017

Publications

Publications (72)
Article
Full-text available
The Duchess of Malfi teems with images of dismembered bodies which form the basis of Webster’s specific macabre poetics. The play is haunted by body parts, at the levels of both plot and imagery. This peculiar aesthetics can be seen as a symptom of a worldview in crisis, in which the correspondences and analogies that had held the world together un...
Book
The focus in the present collection of articles was born from a double sense of urgency, one prompted by a global context marked by the resurgence of religious discourses on purity and condemnations of alleged impurity, and, on a smaller scale, by a critical context which has led to the polarization of the debate around Shakespeare’s religious beli...
Chapter
In this chapter, Line Cottegnies examines how, in his 1640 edition of Jonson’s ‘Englished’ Ars Poetica, the bookseller John Benson included several pieces praising the poet as a second Horace, an outstanding writer and dramatist, and an accomplished translator. Comparing Benson’s paratexts with those displayed in his edition of Shakespeare’s poems,...
Article
This article focuses on the idea, repeatedly reasserted in the second tetralogy, of the impossibility of refounding trust in the political order after the initial “sin” of the deposition of Richard II by Bolingbroke-trust being defined in Georg Simmel's sense as the possibility of investing in a future that can be expected to be the continuation of...
Article
Ever since the discovery of a First Folio in the Saint-Omer library in northern France (on the premises of the former English Jesuit College of St Omers), the academic world has been abuzz with speculation about Jesuit interest in Shakespeare. Based on a thorough investigation of the material context of the Folio in the Saint-Omer library, this ess...
Article
The aims of this special issue are to offer a review of the most recent research on the Saint-Omer First Folio of Shakespeare's works (discovered in the north of France in November 2014): its possessors, tribulations and annotations. Yet, beyond the specificities of this copy, it also focuses on the wider iconic significance of the First Folio - fr...
Article
Full-text available
Gisele Venet Gisele Venet dans son appartement, a Brunoy, 15 septembre 2016 © Anne Dunan-Page Cet entretien s’est deroule le 15 septembre 2016, a Brunoy, lors d’une journee entrecoupee d’un dejeuner offert et prepare par Gisele Venet elle-meme. Le texte, transcrit a partir de plus de quatre heures d’enregistrement, a fait l’objet d’echanges nourris...
Article
While Katherine Philips's translations from Corneille, especially her Pompey, have attracted substantial scholarly attention in recent years, her other translations from the French have been relatively neglected. Yet these shorter translations are key to understanding the kind of niche as a social, fashionable author Philips was attempting to creat...
Article
Since the discovery of a Shakespeare First Folio in Saint-Omer (in northern France), in a city library that had integrated the library of the former English Jesuit College of St Omers at the French Revolution, scholars have been speculating about Catholic interest in Shakespeare. In an article published in May 2015 in Études Épistémè, Line Cottegni...
Book
In Women and Curiosity in Early Modern England and France, the rehabilitation of female curiosity between the sixteenth and the eighteenth centuries is thoroughly investigated for the first time, in a comparative perspective that confronts two epistemological and religious traditions.In the context of the early modern blooming “culture of curiosity...
Chapter
Thanks to the work of a whole generation of scholars we now know how far-reaching the reception of Lucretius was in the early modern period, both in manuscript and print. Particularly well researched has been the so-called “Epicurean revival” of the 1640s and 1650s, which, as Howard Jones, Stephen Clucas, Reid Barbour, and David Norbrook (among oth...
Article
Full-text available
Since the discovery of a copy of a Shakespeare First Folio last November in the Saint-Omer public library, the scholars’ attention has focussed on the identity of the mysterious Nevill, whose name stares at any reader opening the book. His identification, it is assumed, must help date at least some of the annotations in the volume itself. The book,...
Article
A premiere vue, tout devrait opposer curiosite et vanite. L’une, dynamique, la curiosite, que rien a priori ne devrait borner, repond au desir irrepressible de savoir, la libido sciendi en son sens large, cedant au gout de l’etrange, du different, de l’objet singulier a l’origine des collections et des cabinets de curiosites, voire des accumulation...
Article
état non-définitif. Cet article a été soumis à revue et sera publié prochainement. This article is forthcoming.
Chapter
Although apparently incongruous, the comparison between Philips and Herrick helps us understand both authors' relationship to their medium, for both bridged the gap between scribal publication and print by planning their collections for the press. It is also intriguing that their works should have formerly been taken as representative of the 'Caval...
Article
Full-text available
In a pioneering study of 1934 Thomas Franklin Mayo was among the first to suggest the idea of an Epicurean « Renaissance » in England from the year 1650 onwards. Several historians of philosophy and of science, in particular Reid Barbour, Stephen Clucas and Howard Jones, have on the contrary underlined the continuous presence of Epicureanism in Eng...
Book
[résumé de l'éditeur] Ce numéro d'Études Épistémè est le produit de deux projets collaboratifs et comporte deux volets. La première partie est issue des communications présentées en mars 2008 lors de la journée d'études qui s'est tenue au Centre d'Études Supérieures de la Renaissance (Tours) sur les " Figures du conflit dans le théâtre historique e...
Article
ISBN : 278-2-84788-107-3 Présentation des explorateurs étudiés : p. 217 à 222 Book, Edited
Article
This essay proposes to study the trope of the play-within-the-play, or more widely the metadramatic devices loosely covered by the term « mise en abyme », in one of Margaret Cavendish’s late plays, The Convent of Pleasure (1668). It will be shown that the play, although late in the century, can be considered as one of the last « Maniériste » plays,...
Article
The French Romantics showed little curiosity for Shakespeare as a poet, let alone as a sonneteer. The first translations of his works usually ignore his poems and these start making their entry into the complete works only towards the middle of the XIXth century. When Pierre Letourneur published the first, epoch-making translation of Shakespeare’s...
Chapter
In the mid 1680s, Aphra Behn started translating from French into English at speed. She had been to France early in 1683 on a trip which, although undocumented, appears to have allowed her to perfect her knowledge of French. In the seventeenth century, the translation of the classics was recognized as a prestigious activity, but this was not the ca...
Article
This paper purports to enquire into the enduring popularity of Guarini’s Il Pastor fido all through the seventeenth century. It focusses more particularly on Richard Fanshawe’s 1647 translation, which superseded a 1602 anonymous translation and went through six editions in a century. As will be apparent, its success is linked with its politics of n...
Article
In Shakespeare as in Rabelais, forms of grotesque vary and present an essential duality: jokers and farce characters seem at first to incarnate this “grotesque realism” that Bakhtine defined as a subversive and popular principle of enjoyment obeying a profanatory and liberating laughter; however, grotesque can also reveal more tragic aspects when t...
Article
Full-text available
Cottegnies Line. "Speechless Discourse": image et discours dans un traite d'art du milieu du XVIIe siecle. In: XVII-XVIII. Bulletin de la societe d'etudes anglo-americaines des XVIIe et XVIIIe siecles. N°40, 1995. pp. 7-25.
Article
Anthologie de textes en traduction, avec commentaire et appareil critique, autour de A Serious Proposal to the Ladies / Proposition sérieuse aux femmes de condition de Mary Astell (1694)

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