Lindstedt Carita

Lindstedt Carita
University of Jyväskylä | JYU ·  Department of Biological and Environmental Science

PhD

About

42
Publications
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Introduction
Carita Lindstedt currently works at the Department of Biological and Environmental Science , University of Jyväskylä. Lindstedt does research in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. She is currently focusing to understand how ecological and social conditions shape the cooperation in antipredator defence and animal signalling.The most recent publication is 'Genetic Basis of Body Color and Spotting Pattern in Redheaded Pine Sawfly Larvae ( Neodiprion lecontei )' done in collaboration with The Linnen Lab at University of Kentucky.
Additional affiliations
January 2010 - December 2011
University of Cambridge
January 2007 - December 2013
University of Jyväskylä

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
Our understanding of how novel warning color traits evolve in natural populations is largely based on studies of reproductive stages and organisms with endogenously produced pigmentation. In these systems, genetic drift is often required for novel alleles to overcome strong purifying selection stemming from frequency‐dependent predation and positiv...
Preprint
Full-text available
Our understanding of how novel color traits evolve in aposematic taxa is based largely on studies of reproductive stages and organisms with endogenously produced pigmentation. In these systems, genetic drift is often required for novel alleles to overcome strong purifying selection stemming from frequency-dependent predation and positive assortativ...
Article
Full-text available
To understand how variation in warning displays evolves and is maintained, we need to understand not only how perceivers of these traits select color and toxicity but also the sources of the genetic and phenotypic variation exposed to selection by them. We studied these aspects in the wood tiger moth Arctia plantaginis, which has two locally co-occ...
Article
Full-text available
Camouflage may promote fitness of given phenotypes in different environments. The tawny owl (Strix aluco) is a color polymorphic species with a gray and brown morph resident in the Western Palearctic. A strong selection pressure against the brown morph during snowy and cold winters has been documented earlier, but the selection mechanisms remain un...
Preprint
The maintenance of cooperation is difficult whenever collective action problems are vulnerable to freeriding (reaping the benefits without contributing to the maintenance of the good). We identify a novel factor that can make a system tolerate an extent of freeriding. If a population consists of discrete types with demographically distinct roles, s...
Article
Full-text available
Antipredator strategies of the pupal stage in insects have received little attention in comparison to larval or adult stages. This is despite the fact that predation risk can be high during the pupal stage, making it a critical stage for subsequent fitness. The immobile pupae are not, however, defenceless; a wide range of antipredator strategies ha...
Article
Full-text available
1.Trade‐offs have been shown to play an important role in the divergence of mating strategies and sexual ornamentation, but their importance in explaining warning signal diversity has received less attention. In aposematic organisms, allocation costs of producing the conspicuous warning signal pigmentation under nutritional stress could potentially...
Preprint
Full-text available
Social interactions within species can modulate the response to selection and determine the extent of evolutionary change. Yet relatively little work has determined whether the social environment can influence the evolution of traits that are selected by interactions with other species - a major source of natural selection. Here we show that the am...
Article
Full-text available
Insectivorous birds feed upon all developmental stages of herbivorous insects, including insect eggs if larvae and adults are unavailable. Insect egg deposition on plants can induce plant traits that are subsequently exploited by egg parasitoids searching for hosts. However, it is unknown whether avian predators can also use egg-induced plant chang...
Article
The evolution of cooperation and social behaviour is often studied in isolation from the ecology of organisms. Yet, the selective environment under which individuals evolve is much more complex in nature, consisting of ecological and abiotic interactions in addition to social ones. Here, we measured the life-history costs of cooperative chemical de...
Article
Full-text available
Chemically defended animals often display conspicuous color patterns that predators learn to associate with their unprofitability and subsequently avoid. Such animals (i.e., aposematic), deter predators by stimulating their visual and chemical sensory channels. Hence, aposematism is considered to be "multimodal." The evolution of warning signals (a...
Article
Full-text available
Pigmentation has emerged as a premier model for understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution, and a growing catalog of color loci is starting to reveal biases in the mutations, genes, and genetic architectures underlying color variation in the wild. However, existing studies have sampled a limited subset of taxa, color traits, and develo...
Preprint
Pigmentation has emerged as a premier model for understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution, and a growing catalog of color loci is starting to reveal biases in the mutations, genes, and genetic architectures underlying color variation in the wild. However, existing studies have sampled a limited subset of taxa, color traits, and develo...
Article
Burying beetles (Nicrophorus vespilloides) bear distinctive and variable orange-black patterning on their elytra and produce an anal exudate from their abdomen when threatened. During breeding, the anal exudates contribute to the antimicrobial defence of the breeding resource. We investigated whether the anal exudates also provide a responsive chem...
Article
Burying beetles (Nicrophorus vespilloides) bear distinctive and variable orange-black patterning on their elytra and produce an anal exudate from their abdomen when threatened. During breeding, the anal exudates contribute to the antimicrobial defense of the breeding resource. We investigated whether the anal exudates also provide a responsive chem...
Article
Full-text available
‘Cry for help’ hypothesis predicts that attraction of predators with chemical or visual cues can decrease insect damage of plants. Visual cues involve changes in photosynthetic activity and the reflectance of leaves, and there is some evidence that birds may use these changes as foraging cues. However, changes in the visual properties of leaves hav...
Article
Full-text available
To predict evolutionary responses of warning signals under selection, we need to determine the inheritance pattern of the signals, and how they are genetically correlated with other traits contributing to fitness. Furthermore, protective coloration often undergoes remarkable changes within an individual's lifecycle, requiring us to quantify the gen...
Article
Full-text available
The maintenance of multiple morphs in warning signals is enigmatic because directional selection through predator avoidance should lead to the rapid loss of such variation. Opposing natural and sexual selection is a good candidate driving the maintenance of multiple male morphs but it also includes another enigma: when warning signal efficiency dif...
Article
Full-text available
Sequestration of plant defensive chemicals by herbivorous insects is a way of defending themselves against their natural enemies. Such herbivores have repeatedly evolved bright colours to advertise their unpalatability to predators, i.e. they are aposematic. This often comes with a cost. In this study, we examined the costs and benefits of sequestr...
Article
Full-text available
Through dishonest signals or actions, individuals often misinform others to their own benefit. We review recent literature to explore the evolutionary and ecological conditions for deception to be more likely to evolve and be maintained. We identify four conditions: (1) high misinformation potential through perceptual constraints of perceiver; (2)...
Article
Full-text available
Evolutionary consequences of deception - special issue
Article
Full-text available
1.Polymorphism in warning coloration is puzzling because positive frequency-dependent selection by predators is expected to promote monomorphic warning signals in defended prey. 2.We studied predation on the warning-coloured wood tiger moth (Parasemia plantaginis) by using artificial prey resembling white and yellow male colour morphs in five separ...
Article
One suggested anti-predator function of alarm calls is to deliver a message to a predator that it has been detected. Moreover, giving the alarm call could provide a signal to the predator that capturing the individual giving the alarm is more difficult than capturing its silent group members, as the caller is probably the most aware of the predator...
Article
Full-text available
Warning signals are expected to evolve towards conspicuousness and monomorphism, and thereby hamper the evolution of multiple colour morphs. Here, we test fitness responses to different rearing densities to explain colour polymorphism in aposematic wood tiger moth (Parasemia plantaginis) males. We used larval lines sired by white or yellow adult ma...
Article
Seasonal polyphenism in animal colour patterns indicates that temporal variation in selection pressures maintains phenotypic plasticity. Spring generation of the polyphenic European map butterfly Araschnia levana has an orange–black fritillary‐like pattern whilst individuals of the summer generation are black with white bands across the wings. What...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous herbivorous insect species sequester noxious chemicals from host plants that effectively defend against predators, and against parasitoids and pathogens. Sequestration of these chemicals may be expensive and involve a trade off with other fitness traits. Here, we tested this hypothesis. We reared Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea ci...
Data
Correlations between ig-levels and nutritional quality of the diets
Data
Temperature and light conditions in the environmental chamber during the experiment
Article
Full-text available
Evolution of costly secondary defences for a cryptic prey is puzzling, if the prey is already well protected by camouflage. However, if the chemical defence is not sufficient to deter all predators, selection can favour low signal intensity in defended prey. Alternatively, if the costs of chemical defence are low or cost-free, chemical defences can...
Article
Full-text available
The coloration of species can have multiple functions, such as predator avoidance and sexual signalling, that directly affect fitness. As selection should favour traits that positively affect fitness, the genes underlying the trait should reach fixation, thereby preventing the evolution of polymorphisms. This is particularly true for aposematic spe...
Article
Full-text available
Conventionally, predation is assumed to select for conspicuousness and uniformity of warning signals in aposematic (i.e., chemically defended and warning signaling) prey because this enhances predators' initial and learned avoidance. On the other hand, it has been suggested that both variation in the background where the signal is displayed as well...
Data
Full-text available
Methods diagram. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
The coincidental evolution hypothesis predicts that traits connected to bacterial pathogenicity could be indirectly selected outside the host as a correlated response to abiotic environmental conditions or different biotic species interactions. To investigate this, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, Serratia marcescens, was cultured in the absenc...
Article
Full-text available
1. Aposematic animals advertise their defences to predators via warning signals that often are bright colours combined with black patterns. Predation is assumed to select for large pattern elements and conspicuousness of warning signals because this enhances avoidance learning of predators. However, conspicuousness of the colour pattern can vary am...
Article
Full-text available
Aposematic herbivores are under selection pressure from their host plants and predators. Although many aposematic herbivores exploit plant toxins in their own secondary defense, dealing with these harmful compounds might underlay costs. We studied whether the allocation of energy to detoxification and/or sequestration of host plant defense chemical...
Article
Full-text available
Evolution of conspicuous signals may be constrained if animal coloration has nonsignaling as well as signaling functions. In aposematic wood tiger moth (Parasemia plantaginis) larvae, the size of a warning signal (orange patch on black body) varies phenotypically and genetically. Although a large warning signal is favored as an antipredator defense...
Article
Full-text available
The pathogen virulence is traditionally thought to co-evolve as a result of reciprocal selection with its host organism. In natural communities, pathogens and hosts are typically embedded within a web of interactions with other species, which could affect indirectly the pathogen virulence and host immunity through trade-offs. Here we show that sele...
Article
Full-text available
To deter predator attack, aposematic prey species advertise their unprofitability with one or more conspicuous warning signals that, in turn, enhance the avoidance learning of predators. We studied the costs and benefits of multicomponent signalling in Parasemia plantaginis moths. The hairy moth larvae have an orange patch on their otherwise black...
Article
Full-text available
The defence chemicals and behavioural adaptations (gregariousness and active defensive behaviour) of pine sawfly larvae may be effective against ant predation. However, previous studies have tested their defences against very few species of ants, and few experiments have explored ant predation in nature. We studied how larval group size (groups of...
Article
Full-text available
The defence chemicals and behavioural adaptations (gregariousness and active defensive behaviour) of pine sawXy larvae may be eVective against ant predation. However, previous studies have tested their defences against very few species of ants, and few experiments have explored ant predation in nature. We studied how larval group size (groups of 5...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Archived project
Project
To test experimentally how the social, ecological and environmental conditions shape the evolution of cooperation in antipredator defence and the expression of warning signals.
Archived project
To characterise the chemical defenses of the wood tiger moth, and their variation both within and between populations.