Lindall R Kidd

Lindall R Kidd
RMIT University | RMIT · Centre for Urban Research

About

17
Publications
4,847
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
543
Citations
Citations since 2017
10 Research Items
483 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - present
BirdLife Australia
Position
  • Migratory Shorebird Program Officer

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
Conservation professionals are familiar with value‐driven research and practice. However, recent efforts to use strategic communication, specifically conservation messaging, to affect targeted behaviour change or influence values and attitudes towards conservation introduce new ethical dilemmas that conservation professionals may not have considere...
Article
Full-text available
With COVID-19 dominating headlines, highlighting links between the pandemic and biodiversity may increase public awareness of the biodiversity crisis. However, ill-considered messages that frame nature as the problem rather than the solution could inadvertently propagate problematic narratives and undermine motivations and individual self-efficacy...
Article
Effective public engagement is necessary to reverse the decline of global shorebird populations. Despite recognition of the importance of social science for achieving conservation outcomes, there is limited social science research informing shorebird conservation communications. Strategic communication techniques exist that could support the shoreb...
Article
Full-text available
Bar-tailed godwits (Limosa lapponica) were counted throughout New Zealand and on the east coast of Australia during the 2019-2020 austral summer, in the first attempt to assess the total population of the subspecies baueri on the southern hemisphere non-breeding grounds. Survey coverage in New Zealand was nationwide (158 sites surveyed); surveys in...
Article
Full-text available
The conservation profession is increasingly seeking effective ways to reduce societal impact on biodiversity, including through targeted behavior change interventions. Multiple conservation behavior change programs exist, but there is also great uncertainty regarding which behaviors are most strategic to target. Behavioral prioritization is a tool...
Article
Full-text available
Changing human behavior and attitudes are key to conserving global biodiversity. Despite evidence from other disciplines that strategic messaging can influence behavior and attitudes, it remains unclear how to best design messages to benefit biodiversity. We conducted a systematic literature review to investigate the status of conservation messagin...
Article
Full-text available
In biodiversity conservation, the prevailing consensus is that optimistic messages should be used to inspire people to change their behaviour, but there is scarce empirical evidence that optimistic messages lead to favourable conservation behaviour change.
Experiment Findings
Full-text available
National Environmental Science Program, Threatened Species Recovery Hub research findings factsheet - Messaging matters: A systematic review of conservation messaging literature Project 6.3 Improving communication and community buy-in to threatened species conservation https://www.nespthreatenedspecies.edu.au/publications-tools/findings-factsheet...
Article
Unpopular and uncharismatic species receive less conservation support, potentially impacting their long-term survival. This study assesses the attention directed towards Australian threatened species on the online social network Twitter, an increasingly common way for scientists and the general public to communicate about conservation. We find a di...
Article
The provision of wild birds with supplementary food has increased substantially over recent decades. While it is assumed that provisioning birds is beneficial, supplementary feeding can have detrimental ‘carry-over’ effects on reproductive traits. Due to difficulties in monitoring individual feeding behaviour, assessing how individuals within a pop...
Article
Full-text available
Despite growing interest in animal social networks, surprisingly little is known about whether individuals are consistent in their social network characteristics. Networks are rarely repeatedly sampled; yet an assumption of individual consistency in social behaviour is often made when drawing conclusions about the consequences of social processes a...
Article
Inferences drawn from long-term field studies are vulnerable to biases in observability of different classes of individuals, which may lead to biases in the estimates of selection, or fitness. Population surveys that monitor breeding individuals can introduce such biases by not identifying individuals that fail early in their reproductive attempts....
Article
Full-text available
Animal movement patterns, whether related to dispersal, migration, or ranging behaviors, vary in time. Individual movements reflect the outcomes of interactions between an individual's condition and a multitude of underlying ecological processes. Theory predicts that when competition for breeding territories is high, individuals should arrive at br...
Article
Full-text available
Social network analysis has become a popular tool for characterising the social structure of populations. Animal social networks can be built either by observing individuals and defining links based on the occurrence of specific types of social interactions, or by linking individuals based on observations of physical proximity or group membership,...
Article
Full-text available
Both social and ecological factors influence population process and structure, with resultant consequences for phenotypic selection on individuals. Understanding the scale and relative contribution of these two factors is thus a central aim in evolutionary ecology. In this study, we develop a framework using null models to identify the social and s...

Network

Cited By