Linda Newson

Linda Newson
King's College London | KCL · Department of Geography

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Publications

Publications (94)
Chapter
Full-text available
The Jesuits’ colonial legacy in Latin America is well-known. They pioneered an interest in indigenous languages and cultures, compiling dictionaries and writing some of the earliest ethnographies of the region. They also explored the region’s natural history and made significant contributions to the development of science and medicine. On their est...
Book
Full-text available
Acompañada de una nueva introducción, esta traducción al español del clásico libro, Indian Survival in Colonial Nicaragua, ofrece una descripción detallada de los cambios demográficos y culturales que la conquista española y el dominio colonial trajeron a las sociedades indígenas de Nicaragua. Muestra cómo la naturaleza de las propias sociedades in...
Article
The demand for beeswax for liturgical and medicinal purposes in the Americas vastly increased with the arrival of the Spanish. However, the absence of bees in early colonial Peru meant that this demand could not be met locally. Some beeswax was imported from Spain and from other American regions, but an alternative source emerged with the Portugues...
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Celia Cussen , Black Saint of the Americas: The Life and Afterlife of Martín de Porres (New York and Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014), pp. xvi + 292, £60.00, hb. - Volume 47 Issue 3 - LINDA A. NEWSON
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Dana VelascoMurillo, MarkLentz and Margarita R.Ochoa (eds.), City Indians in Spain's American Empire: Urban Indigenous Society in Colonial Mesoamerica and Andean South America, 1530–1810 (Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2012), pp. xv+244, £55.00, hb. - Volume 45 Issue 4 - LINDA A. NEWSON
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This study examines the accounts of the Portuguese New Christian trader, Manoel Batista Peres. These private accounts, found in the Archivo General de la Nación in Lima, Peru, were associated with the trading of slaves on the Upper Guinea Coast in the early seventeenth century. The accounts take the double-entry format but, in the absence of a meta...
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In the context of debates about the definition and origins of globalisation and the role of African agency in the Atlantic slave trade, this chapter examines the commodities traded by Portuguese New Christian slave traders on the Upper Guinea coast in the early 17th century. Based on detailed account books of three slave traders discovered in the I...
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AltmanIda, The War of Mexico's West: Indians and Spaniards in New Galicia, 1524–1550 (Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press, 2010), pp. xx+340, $28.95, pb. - Volume 44 Issue 2 - LINDA A. NEWSON
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Using previously unknown account books, found in archives in Peru, of three New Christian Portuguese slave traders on the Upper Guinea Coast, this article examines the extent and nature of African and Luso-African involvement in the Atlantic trade during the early seventeenth century. Beads, textiles, and wine that figured most prominently among Po...
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VargasHector Mendoza and LoisCarla (eds.), Historia de la cartografía de Iberoamérica: nuevos caminos, viejos problemas (Mexico City: Instituto de Geografía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 2009), pp. 494. - Volume 43 Issue 2 - LINDA A. NEWSON
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GiraldoManuel Lucena, A los cuatro vientos: Las ciudades de la América Hispánica (Madrid: Fundación Carolina; Centro de Estudios Hispánicos e Iberoamericanos; Marcial Pons Historia, 2006), pp. 245, €18.00, pb. - Volume 41 Issue 2 - LINDA A. NEWSON
Chapter
This chapter examines the decline of populations in Bikol during the Spanish conquest and colonization. The Spanish first came in contact with the Bikol region in 1567, when Martín de Goiti and Mateo de Saz were dispatched by Miguel López de Legazpi to pacify the islands of Leyte, Panay, and Masbate. Two years later Legazpi dispatched another exped...
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This book examines the demographic impact of Spanish colonial rule on the Philippines. It shows that Spain's conquest and colonization of the Philippines brought fundamental changes to the political, economic, social, and cultural life of the islands. It argues that the Filipino population suffered a greater decline in the early Spanish period than...
Chapter
This chapter examines the decline of populations in Pampanga and Bulacan during Spanish times. Under Spanish colonial rule, the southern part of the Central Luzon Plain was shared by Pampangans, who lived to the west of the Pampanga River, and Tagalogs, who lived to the east. The population of the Central Luzon Plain was concentrated around Manila...
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This chapter examines how the Spanish conquest and colonization contributed to depopulation in the Philippines before 1600, with particular emphasis on those aspects of native society that had implications for the nature of Spanish colonial rule and demographic trends in the Visayas. It first provides an overview of subsistence, settlement patterns...
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This chapter examines the evidence that can shed light on the demographic impact of Spanish colonial rule on the Philippines and allow comparisons between population trends in the islands with other parts of the Southeast Asian archipelago. Focusing on demographic trends for each major island and region in Luzon and the Visayas, the chapter shows t...
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This concluding chapter discusses demographic change in the Philippines during the early Spanish colonial period. The initial impact of Spanish conquest and the types of transformations the Spanish sought to bring to native societies in Southeast Asia and in the Americas were similar. However, the Philippines differed from Spanish America in terms...
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This chapter explains how the conquest and establishment of Spanish colonial rule led to a population decline in the Philippines. Once Spain had established a permanent foothold in the islands, their retention of the colony continued to depend on Filipino tribute and labor. Native tribute constituted one of the two main sources of Crown revenue in...
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Scholars have long assumed that Spanish colonial rule had only a limited demographic impact on the Philippines. Filipinos, they believed, had acquired immunity to Old World diseases prior to Spanish arrival; conquest was thought to have been more benign than what took place in the Americas because of more enlightened colonial policies introduced by...
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Much has been written about the spread of Old World crops and livestock in the Americas. However, very little is known, except in very general terms, about the availability of different foods, diets and nutrition, particularly among the common people, in different regions of Spanish America in the early colonial period. This derives in part from th...
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This paper outlines the current state of research on medical practice in early colonial Spanish America. It argues that medical practice in Spain was more diverse than generally supposed, and that this complicated the exchange that occurred between Native American, African and European medical traditions in the Americas. Control of medical practice...
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Documentary evidence for the demographic impact of Spanish conquest and colonial rule in the Philippines suggests that the pre-Spanish population was about 1.5 million. This is higher than previous estimates and implies that the decline in the early colonial period was greater than often supposed. However, the decline was lower than that associated...
Article
Full-text available
David J. Robinson, Collaguas II. Lari Collaguas: economía, sociedad y población, 1604–1605. Homenaje a Franklin Pease G. Y. (Lima: Fondo Editorial de la Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú and Syracuse, NY: University of Syracuse, 2003), pp. cxii+514, pb. - - Volume 37 Issue 4 - LINDA A. NEWSON
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The arrival of Europeans in the Americas resulted in what was perhaps the greatest demographic collapse in history. In 1492 the native population is estimated to have been between fifty and sixty million; by the mid-seventeenth century it had fallen to between five and six million. Subsequently, it recovered slowly. But even today the indigenous po...
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Full-text available
This paper examines regional variations in Indian population decline Ecuador in the sixteenth century. It examines the impact of Old World diseases and the economic enterprises the Spanish established in the region. Although the population declined by 85 percent, this figure masks considerable variations. There was no marked variation in levels of...
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Hispanic American Historical Review 82.4 (2002) 788-790 This book by William Denevan on Amazonia and the Andes is one of a series of three volumes on the cultivated landscapes of the Americas; the others are on Middle America and North America. The authors of all three volumes are geographers and, to differing degrees, they belong to a common intel...
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Introduction Part I. The Itza World: 1. The Itzas and their neighbors 2. Itza-Spanish encounters, 1525-1690 3. Itza society and kingship on the eve of conquest Part II. Road to the Itzas: 4. Power politics 5. The birth of the camino real 6. Franciscans on the camino real Part III. The Peace Seekers: 7. The Itza emissaries 8. Avendano and Adjaw Kan...
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It is generally asserted that Filipino populations did not suffer the same demographic collapse that followed Spanish conquest in the Americas because they had previously acquired immunity to Old World diseases through trading contacts with Asia. This assertion is examined by trying to establish which diseases were present in the islands in pre-Spa...
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"Recent archaeological, ethnohistorical and ecological evidence has begun to challenge the view that 'civilizations' failed to develop in the Amazon basin due to limitations of the tropical forest environment. As a result, estimates of the native population in 1492 have become an issue of debate. These estimates are evaluated in the light of the et...
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LutzChristopher H., Santiago de Guatemala, 1541–1773: City, Caste, and the Colonial Experience (Norman Oklahoma and London: University of Oklahoma Press, 1994), pp. xx + 346, $37.95. - Volume 28 Issue 1 - Linda A. Newson
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Full-text available
ENTRE ORELLANA ET ACUÑA : UN SIECLE PERDU DANS L’HISTOIRE DU NORD-OUEST DE L’AMAZONIE. Cet article étudie l’histoire de la vallée du Napo entre 1580 et 1636. Entre ces dates le caractère, la taille et la répartition des populations indigènes changèrent énormément, mais les causes de ces changements restent obscures du fait de contacts apparemment l...
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JacksonRobert H., Indian Population Decline: The Missions of Northwestern New Spain, 1687–1840 (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1994), pp. xii + 228, $29.95. - Volume 27 Issue 3 - Linda A. Newson
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BlockDavid, Mission Culture on the Upper Amazon: Native Tradition, Jesuit Enterprise and Secular Policy in Moxos 1660–1880, (Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1994), pp. xii + 240, £28.50. - Volume 27 Issue 1 - Linda A. Newson
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When the Jesuits were expelled from Spanish America in 1767 they were administering over 250,000 Indians in over 200 missions. The fate of the missions varied. Some were secularized, others were encharged to other religious orders, while others collapsed. Missions continued to be supported by the Crown where they were the most economic means of def...
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GosnerKevin, Soldiers of the Virgin: The Moral Economy of a Colonial Maya Rebellion (Tucson, Arizona: The University of Arizona Press, 1992), pp. xiv + 227, $29.95. - Volume 25 Issue 3 - Linda A. Newson
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Old World epidemics played a major role in the demographic collapse of native peoples after 1492. In estimating aboriginal populations it is often assumed that once introduced Old World diseases spread unhindered and their impact was uniform. This paper indicates that there were often marked regional differences in impact of Old World diseases whic...
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CarrollPatrick J., Blacks in Colonial Veracruz: Race, Ethnicity, and Regional Development (Austin, Texas: University of Texas Press, 1993), pp. xv + 240, £35.00. - Volume 25 Issue 1 - Linda A. Newson
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SchwartzNorman B., Forest Society: A Social History of Petén, Guatemala (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1991), pp. xiv + 367, £13.25, pb. - Volume 24 Issue 2 - Linda A. Newson
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BertrandMichel, Terre et Société Coloniak: Les Communautés Maya-Quiché de la Région de Rabinal du XVIe au XIX Siècle (Mexico: Centre d'Etudes Mexicaines et Centroaméricaines, 1987), pp. 332. - Volume 22 Issue 1-2 - Linda A. Newson
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SuperJohn C., Food, Conquest and Colonization in Sixteenth-Century Spanish America (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1988), pp. viii + 133. - Volume 21 Issue 1-2 - Linda A. Newson
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MartínezBernardo García, Los Pueblos de la Sierra: El Poder y el Espacio entre los Indios de Norte de Puebla hasta 1700 (Mexico: Colegio de México, 1987), pp. 424. - Volume 21 Issue 1-2 - Linda A. Newson
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ClineS. L.: Colonial Culbuacan, 1580–1600: A Social History of an Aztec Town (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1986, US $29.95). Pp. xviii + 258. - Volume 20 Issue 1 - Linda A. Newson
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SporesRonald (vol. ed.) with the assistance of Patricia A. Andrews: Supplement to the Handbook of Middle American Indians. Volume 4. Ethnohistory. (Austin, Texas: University of Texas Press, 1986, $40.00). Pp. vii + 232. - Volume 19 Issue 2 - Linda A. Newson
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UrbanP. A. and SchortmanE. M. (eds.): The Southeast Maya Periphery (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1986, $37.50). Pp. 407. - Volume 19 Issue 2 - Linda A. Newson
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Van OssAdriaan C.: Catholic Colonialism: A Parish History of Guatemala, 1524–1821 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986, £27.50). Pp. xx + 248. - Volume 19 Issue 1 - Linda Newson
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WarrenJ. Benedict: The Conquest of Michoacán: The Spanish Domination of the Tarascan Kingdom in Western Mexico, 1521–1530 (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985, $27.50). Pp. xv + 367. - Volume 18 Issue 2 - Linda A. Newson
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The pattern of demographic change in Spanish America during the colonial period is complex. Important variables in understanding the complex pattern are: the nature of Indian societies and the size of their popultions at the time of conquest because these factors influenced the kind of institution used to control and exploit the Indians; and the ki...
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At the time of the Spanish conquest Nicaragua was inhabited by tribes and chiefdoms whose total population ran into hundreds of thousands: today only 4 per cent of the population is classified as Indian. With the exception of a short period in the eighteenth century, the Indian population has declined continuously since the sixteenth century, with...
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Gold and silver production in Honduras probably never exceeded 5% of that produced in Spanish America at any one time during the colonial period, but it was of considerable importance to the local economy and employed a significant proportion of the total workforce. In Spanish America as a whole the types of labour that were employed in mining were...
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ChanceJohn K.: Race and Class in Colonial Oaxaca (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1978, $14.00). Pp. 250. - Volume 11 Issue 2 - Linda Newson
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MarshallWoodville K. (ed.): The Colthurst Journal (Millwood, New York: KTO Press, 1977,$12.50). Pp. 255. - Volume 11 Issue 2 - Linda Newson

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