Linda Camp Keith

Linda Camp Keith
University of Texas at Dallas | UTD · Political Science

PhD

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34
Publications
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1,371
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Publications

Publications (34)
Article
How do the preferences of political elites shape humanitarian immigration to the United States? Focusing on the asylum and refugee systems, we trace the ways that the preferences of political elites affect the number and characteristics of migrants who receive relief. Our findings suggest that presidential preferences remain crucial in determining...
Article
How much does attorney quality influence the outcome of cases in which one litigant is significantly more capable than the other? Using a unique dataset of all asylum merits decision from 1990 to 2010, we find that high quality representation evens the odds for asylum applicants and that not being represented by legal counsel is actually better tha...
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Scholars have found that citizens tend to evaluate European institutions in light of how they feel about their own domestic institutions (second-order evaluations). We argue that this approach is more appropriate for understanding international courts than is the legitimacy approach of the law and courts literature. While studies applying the secon...
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How have recent changes to US asylum law altered who gets asylum? We investigate whether the changes wrought by the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA) and the Real ID Act changed the decision making of immigration judges in asylum cases. We find, contrary to much of the commentary surrounding both IIRIRA and Real I...
Book
Although there are legal norms to secure the uniform treatment of asylum claims in the United States, anecdotal and empirical evidence suggest that strategic and economic interests also influence asylum outcomes. Previous research has demonstrated considerable variation in how immigration judges decide seemingly similar cases, which implies a host...
Article
In seeking to understand the variation in asylum grant rates by immigration judges (IJs), we apply a variation of the attitudinal model that we modify by incorporating a cognitive model of decision making, arguing that some pieces of information before IJs are treated objectively while others are treated subjectively. This model allows us to accoun...
Article
A universal issue of scholastic deliberation, human rights involves a sizeable international involvement in its global deliberation. This article discusses the two broad sets of theoretical perspectives that tend to dominate the empirical examination of both the issues of commitment and compliance: one based on rational actor assumptions and the ot...
Article
"A well-written and well-thought-out book. Linda Camp Keith has contributed mightily to our understanding of the role that courts can play in protecting human rights."-Mark Gibney, University of North Carolina, Asheville The world seems to have reached agreement on a set of ideals regarding state human rights behavior and the appropriate institutio...
Article
We engage theoretical debates within two sub-fields of political science in order to understand U.S. asylum decisions. First, there is significant disagreement among international relations scholars over whether U.S. asylum policy is primarily shaped by its strategic and material interests or by international humanitarian norms. Much of the theory...
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Historically, U.S. asylum policy has reflected both an effort to provide safe haven for deserving asylum seekers as well the intent to promote national security and domestic policy priorities. A growing body of empirical evidence suggests that asylum outcomes, at least in the aggregate, have been weighted more heavily by foreign policy consideratio...
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The United States has obligations under international law and US statutory law to adhere to the legal principle of nonrefoulement to consider asylum claims. Under these laws, a person who qualifies as a refugee may be eligible for asylum and may avoid being deported to his or her country of origin if the applicant meets specific legal requirements....
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The “mere parchment barriers” created by constitutional provisions may lead to decreases in the extent to which nations abuse the human right not to be imprisoned, tortured, killed, or made to disappear arbitrarily or because of your political views. A global pooled cross-national time-series analysis for a 21-year period shows that adopting select...
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This article examines the extent to which the British and French colonial legacies influence the human rights behavior of post-colonial African states. We have examined three areas where the literature suggests different colonial experiences for former British and French colonies: legal systems, formal provisions for judicial independence, and emer...
Article
It is a humbling task to write a tribute to someone as broadly gifted and as widely known and loved as Steve Poe was in political science and the broader human rights community. It is difficult to select the qualities and accomplishments that best represent his life and impossible to know those by which he would want most to be remembered. So here...
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We aim to complement the work of legal scholars by investigating the effects of constitutional provisions for states of emergency, on the respect for personal (or physical) integrity rights, in instances in which governments are confronted with domestic crises. Our findings show that such constitutional provisions have an important impact on govern...
Article
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Article
This global cross-national study seeks to build upon earlier studies that have tested the impact of constitutional provisions upon state human rights behavior. I examine across a twenty-year period the impact of constitutional provisions for six individual freedoms and four due process rights on state abuse of the right to personal integrity. Here...
Article
We seek to explore the opinion assignments of Chief Justices from 1888 to 1940 using three models: the organizational, institutional, and attitudinal models. Methods. We empirically examine opinion assignments from 1888 to 1940 through a data set that the authors have collected. Results. We find that earlier Chief Justices made assignments based on...
Article
Here we seek to build on our earlier research (Poe and Tate, 1994) by re-testing similar models on a data set covering a much longer time span; the period from 1976 to 1993. Several of our findings differ from those of our earlier work. Here we find statistical evidence that military regimes lead to somewhat greater human rights abuse, defined in t...
Article
This research note expands on the work of Guliuzza, Reagan, and Barrett (1994) by reexamining the impact of the Bork nomination on the confirmation criteria that the Senate Judiciary Committee applies to Supreme Court nominees. In a multivariate analysis we examine empirically whether the Bork nomination did, in fact, mark a change in the level of...
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Full-text available
Formal acceptance of international agreements on human rights has progressed to the point where currently over three-quarters of the UN member states are parties to the International Covenant on Political and Civil Rights. In fact, becoming a party to this covenant seems to be concomitant with joining the UN. Of the newly independent states in East...
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Full-text available
Studies of decision making on the modern Supreme Court have drawn on readily available empirical data to explore the details of how the Court conducts its business (Segal and Spaeth 1993; Spaeth 1995). Sadly, however, such empirical studies have not been plentiful for periods of the Court’s history before the appointment of Chief Justice Earl Warre...
Article
Theory: As they learn a new role, Justices experience an initial period of adjustment to the Supreme Court, which creates voting instability. Hypothesis: Justices during the time 1888-1940 are more likely to experience acclimation effects than those in the modern era. Those with judicial experience, however, may not experience such shifts. Methods:...
Article
This article examines the extent to which the British and French colonial legacies influence the human rights behavior of post-colonial African states. We have examined three areas where the literature suggests different colonial experiences for former British and French colonies: legal systems, formal provisions for judicial independence, and emer...
Article
Mode of access: Internet, via World Wide Web. System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Title from title page display. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of North Texas, 1999. Includes bibliographical references.
Article
Thesis (M.A.)--University of North Texas, Aug., 1994. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 129-139). Microfiche. "13-58735."
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Thesis (M.A.)--University of North Texas, 1994. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 129-139). Photocopy.