Linda Houser-Marko

Linda Houser-Marko
Johnson O'Connor Research Foundation · Research, Chicago

PhD

About

22
Publications
18,223
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,389
Citations
Introduction
Linda Houser-Marko currently works at the Johnson O'Connor Research Foundation. Linda does research in Positive Psychology, Organizational Psychology and Social Psychology.
Additional affiliations
October 2010 - present
Johnson O'Connor Research Foundation
Johnson O'Connor Research Foundation
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Research design, data analysis, and quantitative analysis with the leading aptitude testing and research foundation. -Studies of college majors and occupations. -Special topics: theater artists and creativity, and spatial ability and the STEM fields.
October 2007 - September 2010
University of Illinois at Chicago
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
Two studies used the self-concordance model of healthy goal striving (K. M. Sheldon & A. J. Elliot, 1999) to examine the motivational processes by which people can increase their level of well-being during a period of time and then maintain the gain or perhaps increase it even further during the next period of time. In Study 1, entering freshmen wi...
Article
Full-text available
Why do some people persist in goal pursuit, even in the face of boredom or setbacks, whereas others quickly give up their goals? In this research, the authors introduce a new motivational construct, the "self-as-doer," to explore this question. Studies 1 and 2 found longitudinal evidence that those who more strongly endorse doer statements regardin...
Poster
Full-text available
By considering a person’s perceived fit of their college major with their abilities, we can gain more of an understanding of person environment fit. In this analysis, the numerical factor was indeed correlated with ratings of college major fit for computer science and science, whereas the spatial factor stood alone for engineering majors. Interesti...
Poster
Full-text available
For those working in business, marketing, and finance, numerical reasoning ability was a relative strength and the field of finance stood out for numeric computation ability. Additionally, those in business who gave higher ratings that their occupation fit with their abilities had higher levels of numeric computation. Likewise, the verbal abilities...
Poster
Full-text available
We investigated cognitive abilities and interests in a longitudinal study of occupational fields. We expected spatial and numerical ability to be predictive of working in the STEM fields. We were also interested in self-reported person-job fit with regard to abilities, as well as vocational interests.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Spatial ability appears to be an important aspect of working in and studying the STEM fields. Each field of STEM has a slightly different profile pattern of numerical, verbal, and spatial abilities. Spatial ability was high for all STEM majors, with the highest levels for engineering and math majors. Females with high spatial ability go into physic...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There is currently much interest in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields and the educational systems needed to support growth for young people in those fields. We took a closer look at the abilities of people working in the fields of engineering and computer science/information technology to better understand the co...
Article
A national evaluation of community-based youth cessation programs delivered in group format provided the opportunity to compare mandated and volunteer program participants on demographics, smoking patterns, other health behaviors and motivation to quit. A total of 857 youth participants completed surveys prior to the start of their treatment progra...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The present study provides a preliminary test of the relationship between objectively-measured abilities, self-perceived abilities, and educational achievement in adults. This study is one of the first to take such an approach for mid-career/mid-life adults, though studies of children have been conducted. Objective measures of numerical, verbal, a...
Article
To examine the inclusion of program evaluation components in a national sample of youth tobacco cessation programs. Program administrators were interviewed to ascertain program characteristics associated with the inclusion of program evaluation components. Two thirds of all surveyed programs (n=591) had an evaluation component; most included attend...
Technical Report
Full-text available
We examined patterns of scores for a Color Perception test and a Color Discrimination test for 9,571 examinees. Examinees ranged in age from 14 to 76 (M = 25.10, SD = 10.94). For Color Discrimination, the females scored higher than the males, with means of 958.3 versus 945.6 and peaks in the 980s for females and 960s for males. The correlations bet...
Article
Full-text available
University-based community members (N=181) participated in a four-wave, 6-month longitudinal experiment designed to increase treatment participants’ happiness levels. Participants were randomly assigned to set goals either to improve their life circumstances (comparison condition) or to increase their feelings of autonomy, competence, or relatednes...
Article
Full-text available
These studies tested the hypothesis that evaluating goal feedback in terms of a primary, longer term goal can be risky for future motivation. Study 1 was a 2 x 2 experiment in which framing level (primary goal/subgoal) and feedback valence (success/failure) were manipulated for participants during a verbal skills task. In the primary goal failure c...
Article
We assessed implicit orientations towards power versus intimacy using the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) and the Implicit Associations Test (IAT). In addition, we assessed explicit orientations using self-report measures of dominance versus nurturance motives and extrinsic versus intrinsic values. Further, we assessed the rated self-concordance a...
Article
We found that parents of college students report greater goal-autonomy than their children, consistent with organismic, humanistic, and trait perspectives upon positive aging. Parents also had higher levels of positive affect and lower levels of negative affect than their children. In a second, retrospective test of the age-to-autonomy relationship...
Article
Existential, psychosocial, and organismic theories propose that human beings tend towards greater autonomy over the lifespan, and that greater autonomy is associated with greater happiness. We tested these two ideas in the under-studied domain of social duties by examining the associations between chronological age, felt autonomy while engaging in...
Article
We attempted to test Rogers' concept of the organismic valuing process (OVP) by assessing changes in peoples' goal choices over time. When changes occur, are they more or less random, or do people tend to move towards goals that are more likely to be beneficial, both for themselves and others? "Beneficial" goals were defined as goals typically asso...
Article
Two studies used the self-concordance model of healthy goal striving (K. M. Sheldon & A. J. Elliot, 1999) to examine the motivational processes by which people can increase their level of well-being during a period of time and then maintain the gain or perhaps increase it even further during the next period of time. In Study I, entering freshmen wi...

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
We have data for a dichotomous numerical ability test that we would like to refine.
We are looking for someone with experience in Rasch modeling who can collaborate on this small project. We are thinking that this would be a learning process, and so it would not simply be a matter of doing the analyses.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Do theater artists share a pattern of aptitudes? What types of aptitudes do they have? We set out to answer these questions with a study of theater artists that was spearheaded by a former aptitude consultant, Scott Barsotti. Are theater artists more verbal, creative, and musical? Are they good at everything? Of the 131 theater professionals that were in the study, we had the most actors, with directors making up the next biggest group, and also had playwrights and stage managers. The scores that stood out for theater artists as a whole were for Foresight, or the tendency to see many possibilities. A recent study has shown that Foresight is a good indicator not only of seeing possibilities, but also a tendency toward creative achievements. In other words, having a high score on the Foresight test is associated with actual creative achievements. It makes sense that theater artists would have higher levels of creativity as revealed by the Foresight test. The theater artists were indeed verbal, with high vocabularies and flow of ideas as seen in the Ideaphoria test. They scored uniquely high on all three music tests, or Pitch Discrimination, Rhythm Memory and Tonal Memory. Actors had a tendency towards thinking like a specialist, or being Subjective on the Word Association test, which makes sense because they have to “become an expert” at every role that they play. Both actors and directors were higher than average on the test of Analytical Reasoning. This speaks to the background work that perhaps both actors and directors do in analyzing and thinking of systems in their work. Directors had a tendency toward being a generalist, as can be seen with more Objective scores on the Word Association test. Otherwise, directors’ profiles were quite similar to the actors’ profiles, with the exception that they were slightly more average on the music aptitudes. The long list of tests that theater artists scored high on includes Ideaphoria, Foresight, Analytical Reasoning, Number Series, Paper Folding, Tonal Memory, Pitch Discrimination, Rhythm Memory, Silograms, and English Vocabulary. Perhaps to work at the level of a professional theater artist, one must be creative, verbal, good at reasoning, and have some degree of musical aptitude.