Linda Glawe

Linda Glawe
FernUniversität in Hagen · Lehrstuhl für Makroökonomik

Master of Science

About

34
Publications
16,181
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235
Citations

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
Convergence in human capital is a key precondition to achieve income convergence in the European Union; however, so far research on this topic has nearly been absent. Our paper contributes to the literature by investigating the human capital convergence dynamics within the EU over the period 1990–2016 using a nonlinear dynamic factor model. While w...
Article
Recent research shows that schooling is not the same as learning. Still, the mean school years are the standard metric of education-based human capital. We propose a new database on the learning-adjusted years of schooling (LAYS) over the period 1995–2015 by using the World Bank (2018) methodology. The LAYS combine measures of school quantity and s...
Chapter
In the 1960s, about two decades after Japan’s economic takeoff, also South Korea underwent a period of extended growth and managed to rise to the ranks of high-income countries. This Chapter sheds light on the factors that enabled the “Miracle on the Han River”. It analyzes the South Korean export promotion strategy as well as the subsequent HCI dr...
Chapter
Japan was the first of the East Asian countries that succeeded in joining the club of advanced economies, and the Japanese development strategy has provided important lessons for other East Asian countries. This Chapter traces the history of Japan’s development from the Middle Ages to modern times. In this way, it aims to uncover the historical bac...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on the challenges that Japan, South Korea and China are currently facing and will face in the following decades. After a brief look at where East Asia stands today and the recent policy course, this Chapter first addresses the general challenges that affect all countries globally (demographic, climate, digital, structural, and...
Chapter
China presents probably the most astonishing growth miracle in modern world history. This chapter shows how China has developed, starting from the Middle Ages to the present with a special focus on the “Reform and Open-door Policy” under Deng Xiaoping from 1978 onwards. Before outlining individual reforms, this chapter analyzes the special characte...
Book
Full-text available
In light of the growing global economic importance of East Asia, this book analyzes and compares the extraordinary development paths and strategies of Japan, South Korea, and China. It examines both the factors that enabled these countries’ prolonged periods of high-speed economic growth, and the reasons for their subsequent “cool-downs.” In additi...
Chapter
This chapter compares the development processes in Japan, South Korea and China presented in detail in the previous chapters. Glawe and Wagner first identify the commonalities in the development of the three countries and elaborate on whether these commonalities justify speaking of a special “East Asian development model”. In order to come to a bal...
Article
Full-text available
The European integration process started with the aim of reducing the differences in income and/or living standards between the participating countries over time. To achieve this, a certain alignment of institutions and structures was seen as a necessary precondition. While the goal of this income and institutional convergence was successfully achi...
Article
Convergence in institutions and in per capita income across the European Union (EU) Member States are key goals of the European integrations process. Especially in the course of the various EU enlargement waves starting in 2004, it was intensively discussed whether institutional and structural homogeneity are necessary preconditions for real conver...
Article
The European integration process started with the aim of reducing the differences in income and/or living standards between the participating countries over time. To achieve this, a certain alignment of institutions and structures was seen as a necessary precondition. While the goal of this income and institutional convergence was successfully achi...
Article
We modify the concept of the middle-income trap (MIT) against the background of the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the (future) challenges of automation (creating the concept of the “MIT 2.0”) and discuss the implications for developing Asia. In particular, we analyze the impacts of automation, artificial intelligence, and digitalization on the g...
Article
There is an ongoing debate within the economic growth and development literature whether institutions or human capital are more important for economic growth. We add further arguments to this discussion by focusing on a particular country, namely China. China is an interesting case study since it is often regarded as an exception by having achieved...
Article
Over the last decade, a growing body of literature dealing with the phenomenon of the “middle-income trap” (MIT) has emerged. The term MIT usually refers to countries that have experienced rapid growth and thus reached the status of a middle-income country (MIC) in a very short period of time, but have not been able to further catch up with the gro...
Article
The positive link between good institutions and economic development is well documented in the literature on the deep determinants of economic growth. Consequently, convergence in institutional quality should be a necessary precondition for income convergence; however, only recently, researchers started to investigate empirically the nature of inst...
Article
Schooling is not the same as learning. Nonetheless, many cross-country studies still use the mean school years, that is, a purely quantitative measure, to control for human capital. Thus, they ignore that the learning outcomes of two countries can differ dramatically even if they have the same average years of schooling. The concept of the learning...
Article
There is a significant body of literature arguing that institutional quality is the key for long run economic growth and development. While the majority of these studies are based on cross-country growth regressions, we focus on the institution-economic growth nexus within a particular country, namely China. China is often regarded as an exception...
Article
Full-text available
There is a significant body of literature arguing that institutional quality is the key for long run economic growth and development. While the majority of these studies are based on cross-country growth regression, in our paper, we focus on the institution-economic growth nexus within a particular country, namely China. China is often regarded as...
Article
Full-text available
The so-called ‘deep determinants’ of economic growth and development (namely, geography, institutions, and integration) have been found to be decisive for the break out of stagnation and for explaining cross-country income differences by many empirical studies. However, so far, very little has been done to examine to which extent they are also cruc...
Article
Full-text available
The fundamental, underlying factors of development are often neglected when analyzing the question why countries experience a growth slowdown at the middle-income range. Although these so-called ‘deep determinants’ such as geography and institutions have been found to be decisive for the break out of stagnation and for explaining cross-country inco...
Article
Full-text available
Since 2010–2011, China’s economy has slowed considerably, raising concerns that the country could fall into the so-called “middle-income trap” (MIT). Obviously, an MIT in China would have serious negative consequences not only for the Chinese population but also for the world economy as a whole. We examine whether China is or will be in an MIT by f...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last decade, a growing body of literature dealing with the phenomenon of the “middle-income trap” (MIT) has emerged. The term MIT usually refers to countries that have experienced rapid growth and thus reached the status of a middle-income country (MIC) in a very short period of time, but have not been able to further catch up with the gro...
Article
Full-text available
Artikel zu Middle-Income Trap in China, veröffentlicht in der Zeitschrift "Asia Bridge - Trends/Analysen!Strategien für Ihr Asiengeschäft"; Rubrik "Special China" in Aprilheft
Article
The term middle-income trap (MIT) usually refers to countries that have experienced rapid growth and thus quickly reached middle-income status, but then failed to overcome that income range to further catch up to the developed countries. This paper surveys the MIT literature. It begins by laying out different approaches to defining the MIT and by p...

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Project (1)
Project
What is "sustainability" in the context of economic development, what is the connection to balanced growth? In this context I also am working on a) A Macreconomic Model of China