Linda Fink

Linda Fink
Sweet Briar College · Department of Biology

PhD Zoology, University of Florida

About

21
Publications
6,025
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778
Citations
Citations since 2017
1 Research Item
264 Citations
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201720182019202020212022202301020304050

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
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As far as we are aware, the first observation in 2015 of an illegal logging operation in the Sierra Chincua overwintering area within the core zone of the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in Mexico was made in April by a local …
Chapter
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Nectar sources in Texas and northern Mexico allow monarch butterflies to accumulate lipid reserves that support them while overwintering in Mexico. In 2010–2011 this area had the worst drought on record, raising concern that limited nectar would reduce the butterflies’ lipid reserves. In October 2011, at the peak of the fall migration through centr...
Article
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During winter, monarch butterflies form dense colonies in oyamel fir forests on high mountains in central Mexico, where the forest canopy serves both as a blanket, moderating temperature, and an umbrella, shielding the butterflies from rain. In this study we investigated the vertical dimension of the butterflies' use of the oyamel forest: we predic...
Article
Full-text available
1. Survival of overwintering monarch butterflies following severe wet winter storms in Mexico is substantially higher for butterflies that form clusters on the oyamel fir tree trunks than for those that form clusters on the fir boughs. 2. Thermal measurements taken at similar elevations with a weather station on the Sierra Chincua and within a Cerr...
Article
Full-text available
Monarch butterflies form dense clusters in their overwintering colonies in the mountains of central Mexico, where forest cover provides protection from environmental extremes. We tested the hypothesis that the clustering behavior of the butterflies further moderates the microclimate they experience. We inserted hygrochrons (miniaturized digital hyg...
Article
Caterpillars of the hawkmoth Eumorpha fasciata are highly polymorphic for colour, with green, pink, and pink-and-yellow forms in the second through fourth instars, and green and multicoloured forms in the fifth instar. Four years of field censuses on four foodplant species determined that all morphs were found on all plant species; morph frequencie...
Article
Full-text available
Monarch butterflies in eastern North America accumulate lipids during their fall migration to central Mexico, and use them as their energy source during a 5 month overwintering period. When and where along their migratory journey the butterflies accumulate these lipids has implications for the importance of fall nectar sources in North America. We...
Article
Full-text available
Parasitism rates of the nonnative tachinid ßy, Compsilura concinnata (Meigen), on experimental populations of native luna moth caterpillars (Actias luna (L.)) were determined in central Virginia, where both C. concinnata and the gypsy moth, its biocontrol target, have become established in the past few decades. In a forest that has not yet had gyps...
Article
I examined the adaptiveness of maternal behaviour in the green lynx spider Peucetia viridans (Hentz), by measuring the costs and benefits to the female of egg-sac tending. P. viridans guards her egg sac for 6–8 weeks until the young have emerged and dispersed. I removed females from egg sacs in the field either immediately after oviposition or afte...
Article
We have verified that wild birds can become conditioned to reject naturally toxic insects either visually (experiment 1) or by taste (experiment 2). We have also verified, however, that unconditioned taste rejection of noxious chemicals by wild birds also occurs (experiment 3). Such unconditioned responses to the aposematic visual and taste cues of...
Article
Flocks of black-backed orioles (Icterus abeillei Lesson) and black-headed grosbeaks (Pheucticus melanocephalus Swainson) eat several hundred thousand monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus L.) in the dense overwintering colonies in central Mexico, and in 1979 were responsible for over 60% of the butterfly mortality at several sites1. Such predation...

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