Linda Marie Fedigan

Linda Marie Fedigan
The University of Calgary | HBI · Anthropology and Archaeology

PhD in Anthropology

About

214
Publications
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Publications

Publications (214)
Article
Full-text available
Although males often disperse to increase their immediate access to mates, it is unclear whether they also consider potential future reproductive opportunities. We investigated whether immediate or delayed reproductive opportunities predicted dispersal decisions and reproductive success of subordinate immigrant male white-faced capuchins in the Sec...
Article
Reproductive seasonality is typically associated with ecological factors, but it can also be related to social factors, such as alpha male replacements (AMR). Such events can produce distinct birth peaks outside of the ecological peak, potentially increasing hardship for mother and infant and ultimately reducing fitness. We examined the impact of A...
Article
In this paper, I summarize the major facets of my 50-year career as a primatologist. I briefly describe the aspects of my upbringing and early education that led me to the study of primate behavior, first in captive settings and, later, in the wild. My research on the Arashiyama West Japanese macaques and my interactions with Japanese primatologist...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Age-related changes in the capability to produce healthy young are common in humans and are increasingly well documented in nonhuman animals. However, differences among species in the nature of these age-related changes remain poorly understood. We compare patterns and consequences of age-related changes in female reproductive performa...
Article
On 5 February 2021, we observed the first instance of female-committed infanticide followed by cannibalism in a long-studied (> 35 years) population of wild white-faced capuchins (Cebus imitator) in the Santa Rosa Sector of the Área de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica. The events leading up to and including the infanticide and cannibalism were o...
Article
Understanding variation in social grouping patterns among animal taxa is an enduring goal of ethologists, who seek to evaluate the selective pressures shaping the evolution of sociality. Cohesive association with conspecifics increases intragroup feeding competition and may impose constraints on group size. Furthermore, in sexually dimorphic specie...
Article
Objectives: Infanticide in white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus imitator) typically occurs in association with alpha male replacements (AMRs). Although infanticide is likely adaptive for males, it imposes costs on females that are difficult to quantify without long-term demographic data. Here we investigate effects of AMRs and infanticide on fem...
Article
Full-text available
Is it possible to slow the rate of ageing, or do biological constraints limit its plasticity? We test the ‘invariant rate of ageing’ hypothesis, which posits that the rate of ageing is relatively fixed within species, with a collection of 39 human and nonhuman primate datasets across seven genera. We first recapitulate, in nonhuman primates, the hi...
Article
The polymorphic color vision system present in most North, Central, and South American monkeys is a textbook case of balancing selection, yet the mechanism behind it remains poorly understood. Previous work has established task-specific foraging advantages to different color vision phenotypes: dichromats (red-green colorblind) are more efficient fo...
Article
Full-text available
Most primates produce one offspring at a time but can overlap investment in consecutive offspring (stacked investment) depending on ecological and/or social conditions. “Direct stacked investment” occurs when a female conceives and gestates a new offspring while a previous infant is still suckling. We investigate direct stacked investment in Colobu...
Article
Primate offspring often depend on their mothers well beyond the age of weaning, and offspring that experience maternal death in early life can suffer substantial reductions in fitness across the life span. Here, we leverage data from eight wild primate populations (seven species) to examine two underappreciated pathways linking early maternal death...
Preprint
Full-text available
Is it possible to slow the rate of aging, or do biological constraints limit its plasticity? We test this ‘invariant rate of aging’ hypothesis with an unprecedented collection of 39 human and nonhuman primate datasets across seven genera. We first recapitulate, in nonhuman primates, the highly regular relationship between life expectancy and lifesp...
Article
Research on non-human primates in the endangered tropical dry forest of Sector Santa Rosa (SSR), Área de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG), was launched in 1983 and is now one of the longest running studies of primates globally. Such continuous study provides a rare opportunity to ask questions that are only answerable through decades-long monitoring o...
Article
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This article summarizes my perspective on vital lessons that I have learned over my 45 years as a practicing anthropologist. To avoid repeating previously published biographical details of my life, I have only briefly described the facts and stages of my career here. Instead I have focused on a personal account of what I have learned from the event...
Article
Full-text available
Cannibalism has been observed in a variety of animal taxa; however, it is relatively uncommon in primates. Thus, we rely heavily on case reports of this behavior to advance our understanding of the contexts under which it occurs. Here, we report the first observation of cannibalism in a group of wild white‐faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus imitator). T...
Preprint
Full-text available
Primate offspring often depend on their mothers well beyond the age of weaning, and offspring that experience maternal death in early life can suffer substantial reductions in fitness across the lifespan. Here we leverage data from eight wild primate populations (seven species) to examine two underappreciated pathways linking early maternal death a...
Article
Full-text available
With expanding anthropogenic disturbances to forests around the world, forest restoration is increasingly important for bird conservation. Restoration monitoring is critical for understanding how birds respond to forest regeneration and for assessing the effectiveness of restoration efforts. Using bioacoustic monitoring, we recorded bird communitie...
Article
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Extreme climate events can have important consequences for the dynamics of natural populations, and severe droughts are predicted to become more common and intense due to climate change. We analysed infant mortality in relation to drought in two primate species (white-faced capuchins, Cebus capucinus imitator, and Geoffroy's spider monkeys, Ateles...
Article
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Animals born with physical impairments may particularly require behavioural flexibility and innovation to survive and carry out social activities, such as grooming. Studies on free-ranging Japanese macaques on Awaji Island, Japan, have shown that individuals with congenital limb malformations exhibited compensatory behaviours while grooming, such a...
Article
A key goal in behavioral ecology is to investigate the factors influencing the access to food resources and energetic condition of females, which are strong predictors of their reproductive success. We aimed to investigate how ecological factors, social factors, and reproductive state are associated with energetic condition in a wild neotropical pr...
Article
Objectives: Invertebrates are important foods for many primates and provide valuable nutrients often unavailable from plant sources. We examine the diet of white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus imitator) to determine: (a) timing and types of invertebrate food consumption; (b) whether invertebrate consumption varies with availability of plant food...
Article
Full-text available
Primates have long been used as indicator species for assessing overall ecosystem health. However, area-wide census methods are time consuming, costly, and not always feasible under many field conditions. Therefore, it is important to establish whether monitoring a subset of a population accurately reflects demographic changes occurring in the popu...
Article
Full-text available
Many plants use colour to attract pollinators, which often possess colour vision systems well-suited for detecting flowers. Yet, to isolate the role of colour is difficult, as flowers also produce other cues. The study of florivory by Neotropical primates possessing polymorphic colour vision provides an opportunity to investigate the importance of...
Chapter
Popular and scientific interest in menopause in humans has led to an increased interest in the extent of post-fertile life in other animals, particularly in long-lived social species such as other primates and cetaceans. Information on maximum lifespan achieved and age at last birth are available from long-term observations of known individuals fro...
Chapter
A keystone individual is defined as an individual that has a disproportionate impact on group dynamics relative to its representation in the population. Here we use over 30 years of behavioural, physiological, paternity, and demographic data collected on the Santa Rosa, Costa Rica, capuchin population to address the question of whether or not alpha...
Chapter
In many mammalian species, philopatric females reside with female kin with whom they form long-lasting cooperative bonds, whereas dispersing males rarely form strong bonds with other males. However, males may have the opportunity to disperse and form long-lasting bonds with paternal male kin in species with high male reproductive skew and parallel...
Chapter
Seasonal variation in food availability and nutritional intake can ultimately affect female reproductive success. Although many primate studies have looked at foraging behaviour as a measure of diet, nutritional ecology and associated physiological consequences are a relatively new area of research. We present data on variation in the dietary profi...
Article
Infanticide is common in the context of alpha male replacements (AMR), particularly in groups where alpha males experience high reproductive skew and the infants are unlikely to be related to a new alpha male. We examined the relationship between the rate of infant mortality, infant age, and the occurrence and type of AMR in white-faced capuchin mo...
Article
Full-text available
Intraspecific color vision variation is prevalent among nearly all diurnal monkeys in the neotropics and is seemingly a textbook case of balancing selection acting to maintain genetic polymorphism. Clear foraging advantages to monkeys with trichromatic vision over those with dichromatic "red-green colorblind" vision have been observed in captive st...
Article
Earth's rapidly changing climate creates a growing need to understand how demographic processes in natural populations are affected by climate variability, particularly among organisms threatened by extinction. Long-term, large-scale, and cross-taxon studies of vital rate variation in relation to climate variability can be particularly valuable bec...
Article
Objectives: The physical condition of females depends on access to resources, which vary over space and time. Assessing variation in physical condition can help identify factors affecting reproductive success, but noninvasive measurement is difficult in wild animals. Creatinine concentration relative to the specific gravity (i.e., density) of urin...
Chapter
Capuchins are distributed across most of South and Central America and are divided into two types: robust monkeys with tufts of fur on their heads (genus Sapajus) and more gracile monkeys with smooth, untufted caps of fur (genus Cebus). They are distinguished from other Neotropical primates by their well-developed motor skills, problem-solving abil...
Article
Most mammals live in social groups in which members form differentiated social relationships. Individuals may vary in their degree of sociality, and this variation can be associated with differential fitness. In some species, for example, female sociality has a positive effect on infant survival. However, investigations of such cases are still rare...
Article
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The human lifespan has traversed a long evolutionary and historical path, from short-lived primate ancestors to contemporary Japan, Sweden, and other longevity frontrunners. Analyzing this trajectory is crucial for understanding biological and sociocultural processes that determine the span of life. Here we reveal a fundamental regularity. Two stra...
Article
Reproductive skew in multi-male groups may be determined by the need for alpha males to offer reproductive opportunities as staying incentives to subordinate males (concessions), by the relative fighting ability of the alpha male (tug-of-war), or by how easily females can be monopolized (priority-of-access). These models have rarely been investigat...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Our goal is to investigate flower foraging by capuchin monkeys, a behavior rarely studied in wild primates. We ask what drives seasonal variation in florivory rates: flower quality and abundance or fluctuations in fruit and invertebrate abundances. We explore how capuchins affect the reproductive success of flower food species by quant...
Article
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Documenting primate life history characteristics is important because it provides information about traits that affect the timing and rate of reproduction in these long-lived species. This study describes the hormonal correlates of female reproductive events and quantifies for the first time key life history variables for Colobus vellerosus, using...
Article
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Objective: Circannual variation in reproduction is pervasive in birds and mammals. In primates, breeding seasonality is variable, with seasonal birth peaks occurring even in year-round breeders. Environmental seasonality is reportedly an important contributor to the observed variation in reproductive seasonality. Given that food availability is the...
Article
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We provide male and female census count data, age-specific survivorship, and female age-specific fertility estimates for populations of seven wild primates that have been continuously monitored for at least 29 years: sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi) in Madagascar; muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) in Brazil; capuchin (Cebus capucinus) in Costa Rica;...
Article
Evidence for paternal kin recognition and paternally biased behaviors is mixed among primates. We investigate whether infant handling behaviors exhibit paternal kin biases in wild white-faced capuchins monkeys (Cebus capucinus) by comparing interactions between infants and genetic sires, potential sires, siblings (full sibling, maternal, and patern...
Article
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The spatial distribution of adult trees is typically not expected to reflect the spatial patterns of primary seed dispersal, due to many factors influencing post-dispersal modification of the seed shadow, such as seed predation, secondary seed dispersal and density-dependent survival. Here, we test the hypothesis that spatial distributions of prima...
Article
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Within the second paragraph of page 494 incorrect language was used to characterize the summary characteristics used. Sentences 3–11 of this paragraph should have read: Second, we calculated three univariate summary characteristics: the nearest neighbour distribution function D( r ), the pair-correlation function g( r ) and the K-function K( r ). T...
Conference Paper
Male infanticide typically occurs when a new male kills infants after taking over a dominant reproductive position in a group. Because females invest heavily during gestation and lactation, the costs of infanticide are high. Thus, Abstract a group. Because females invest heavily during gestation and lactation, the costs of infanticide are high. Thu...
Article
The spatial distribution of adult trees is typically not expected to reflect the spatial patterns of primary seed dispersal, due to many factors influencing post-dispersal modification of the seed shadow, such as seed predation, secondary seed dispersal and density-dependent survival. Here, we test the hypothesis that spatial distributions of prima...
Article
Allonursing is a highly cooperative behaviour that may have important fitness consequences for the infant while the benefits to the allomother are less clear. To investigate the function of this behaviour, we compared patterns of allonursing and nursing exhibited by white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus). We used a linear mixed model approa...
Article
Fallback foods (FBFs) are hypothesized to shape the ecology, morphology, and behavior of primates, including hominins. Identifying FBFs is therefore critical for revealing past and present foraging adaptations. Recent research suggests invertebrates act as seasonal FBFs for many primate species and human populations. Yet, studies measuring the cons...
Article
Full-text available
Network optimality has been described in genes, proteins and human communicative networks. In the latter, optimality leads to the efficient transmission of information with a minimum number of connections. Whilst studies show that differences in centrality exist in animal networks with central individuals having higher fitness, network efficiency h...
Article
Full-text available
Network optimality has been described in genes, proteins and human communicative networks. In the latter, optimality leads to the efficient transmission of information with aminimumnumber of connections. Whilst studies show that differences in centrality exist in animal networks with central individuals having higher fitness, network efficiency has...
Conference Paper
Fallback foods, typically defined as lower-quality foods only consumed during preferred food shortages, have shaped many aspects of primate evolution. While many fallback foods are utilized in small quantities annually, they are often important seasonally, and may be crucial for survival in harsh environments. Much of Área de Conservación Guanacast...
Article
Sex-biased dispersal can reduce kin cooperation and kin competition in the dispersed sex. However, this may not be the case when group-living animals engage in parallel dispersal, which occurs when an individual transfers between groups together with other animals or immigrates alone into a group that contains familiar animals. Despite this potenti...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Ecological variation strongly influences female reproductive endocrinology, frequently resulting in seasonal patterns linked to energetic constraints. Such energetic constraints may similarly affect males, but research has emphasized social factors, while largely ignoring ecological influences on male reproduction. We examine the effects of both ec...
Article
The parallel evolution of increased sensorimotor intelligence in humans and capuchins has been linked to the cognitive and manual demands of seasonal extractive faunivory. This hypothesis is attractive on theoretical grounds, but it has eluded widespread acceptance due to lack of empirical data. For instance, the effects of seasonality on the extra...
Article
Although predation has likely played a central role in the evolution of primate socioecology, we currently lack a thorough understanding of how fine-scale variation in perceived predation risk affects primates' short-term space use patterns and predator avoidance strategies. We examined the spatial and ecological characteristics of predator encount...
Article
The factors that drive within-species variation in animal space use remain poorly understood. A growing body of evidence suggests that both home range attributes and biological interpretations of the home range may depend fundamentally on the scale of analysis. We utilize a multiscale mixed effects modelling framework to examine how seasonal fluctu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Infanticide occurs in a range of primate species, usually in the context of intergroup encounters, group takeovers, or following changes to the male dominance hierarchy. Here we report on two infanticides – one observed and one inferred – during a socially stable period in one group from the Santa Rosa, Costa Rica population of white-faced capuchin...
Article
Debates about the likelihood of conspecific care for disabled individuals in ancestral hominins rely on evidence from extant primates, yet little is known about social treatment (positive, neutral or negative) of physically disabled individuals in nonhuman primates. A group of free-ranging Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) at the Awajishima Monkey...
Article
Full-text available
The leading explanatory model for the widespread occurrence of color vision polymorphism in Neotropical primates is the heterozygote superiority hypothesis, which postulates that trichromatic individuals have a fitness advantage over other phenotypes because redgreen chromatic discrimination is useful for foraging, social signaling, or predator det...
Article
Much attention has been paid to hormonal variation in relation to male dominance status and reproductive seasonality, but we know relatively little about how hormones vary across life history stages. Here we examine fecal testosterone (fT), dihydrotestosterone (fDHT), and glucocorticoid (fGC) profiles across male life history stages in wild white-f...
Article
Full-text available
Parasite infections in wildlife are influenced by many factors including host demography, behavior and physiology, climate, habitat characteristics, and parasite biology and ecology. White-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) host a suite of gastrointestinal and pulmonary parasites, yet the mechanisms affecting host susceptibility and parasite transmi...
Article
Full-text available
Primate color vision is well suited for investigating the genetic basis of foraging behavior owing to a clear genotype–phenotype linkage. Finding fruits amid tropical foliage has long been proffered as an adaptive explanation for primate trichromacy, yet there is a dearth of systematic evaluations of frugivory as an ecological selective force. We s...