Lilly Lim-Camacho

Lilly Lim-Camacho
The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation | CSIRO · Division of Land and Water

PhD

About

42
Publications
15,308
Reads
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493
Citations
Citations since 2017
17 Research Items
418 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - June 2014
The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Position
  • Researcher
January 2007 - January 2012
TNS
Position
  • Qualitative Research Specialist
November 2004 - December 2007
The University of Queensland
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
Affecting behavioural change is a common underlying goal across environmental and agricultural sciences, from climate change mitigation and adaptation, biodiversity conservation, water management, to crop diversification. However, many projects fail to drive or sustain change despite sound science and good intentions. This paper draws on existing t...
Article
Full-text available
The Indo-Pacific is a region of the world experiencing rapid growth in population and development. However, it is also exposed to a number of social, economic, geopolitical, and biophysical stressors, which may undermine the region's ability to support its population, ensure food security, and sustain livelihoods. In response to the complex suite o...
Chapter
The economic and natural environments in which fresh produce supply chains operate are continuously changing, and more so with the challenges that climate change and a growing population impose. In order to adapt to these changes, there is a pressing need to quantify and understand the risks and identify the strategies that can minimize them. The p...
Article
Transdisciplinary collaborative processes like knowledge co-production have been promoted as valuable mechanisms to address complex environmental management issues. Their value is based on epistemic and participatory ideals involving academic and non-academic knowledge and values being elicited and deliberated upon. While idealised processes of par...
Article
Full-text available
Low and middle-income countries increasingly face a triple burden of malnutrition encompassing under-nutrition, micro-nutrient deficiency, and excessive energy consumption contributing to overweight and obesity. Food systems are also becoming more complex, supported by investments in food processing and retailing. Traditional approaches addressing...
Article
A key reason for undertaking transdisciplinary processes such as knowledge co-production in natural resource management is to access and apply different knowledge systems to complex issues. However, the value of co-production is predominantly framed by academics. They have focused on research design and outcomes in the form of 'science informing po...
Article
In order to deliver the vital materials needed for a low-carbon economy, the mining chain's resilience to climate impacts must be improved. Management decisions spanning a broad domain need an approach that will support resilience to climate impacts as extremes become more intense. We explore a whole-of-chain approach that considers product flow (t...
Article
Full-text available
Sunflower is an important oil seed crop which is well fitted in Robi season of the coastal areas of Bangladesh. This study focused on sunflower value chain map, value addition, value chain governance and institutional linkages, and stakeholders and their roles and responsibilities in value adding process of sunflower. A total of 60 respondents were...
Conference Paper
Climate change, and its associated climate variability, has significant impacts on the wine industry and these changes will increasingly be felt along the whole chain of companies that produce, handle, process and market wine. There has been very little work in understanding how wine consumers perceive both the climate change mitigation and adaptat...
Article
The viability of climate adaptation strategies adopted by agrifood companies rely heavily on how well consumers understand, accept and/or select commodities and their willingness to bare some of the cost of adaptation. To understand this issue in more detail, a survey was undertaken of 1532 Australian consumers to investigate how they respond to ad...
Article
Full-text available
Continued population growth and land intensification put increasing pressure on agricultural production and point to a need for a ‘step change’ in agriculture to meet the demand. Advances in digital technology—often encapsulated in the term ‘big data’—are increasingly assumed to be the way this challenge will be met. For this to be achieved, it is...
Article
Full-text available
Climate variability is a key source of livelihood risks faced by smallholder farmers in drier environments in many developing countries. Climate information provided on seasonal time-scales can sometimes improve agricultural decision-making. However, there are many barriers to the effective dissemination, communication and use of such information o...
Article
Full-text available
Preparing for climate change represents a significant challenge to environmental managers and is influenced by their ability to access and use the latest information. However, communicating and delivering adaption science across diverse stakeholder groups remain a significant challenge. We explore the utility of concepts from personality research t...
Article
https://sciencetrends.com/resource-supply-chains-threat-climate-change/
Article
Global resource supply chains deliver products such as fish, rice and minerals from producers to consumers around the world, linking disparate regions and economies. These supply chains are increasingly exposed to the impacts of a changing climate, yet receive little attention relative to the study of the production phase. Too often, business learn...
Article
Full-text available
Despite there being considerable research and knowledge surrounding the risks of climate change on agricultural productivity, fewer studies have examined risks from a whole-of-chain perspective (i.e. from producer to consumer) and the perceptions of consumers about the climate adaptation strategies of food businesses. This paper presents the findin...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The impacts of climate change are felt along the whole chain of actors that produce, handle, process and market agri-food products. This project aims to help agri-food companies to systematically identify, assess, prioritise and act against risks and to seize opportunities that extreme weather and a changing climate might offer to their chains usin...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change adds an additional layer of complexity that needs to be considered in business strategy. For firms in the food industry, many of the important climate impacts are not directly related to food processing so a value chain approach to adaptation is recommended. However, there is a general lack of operational tools to support this. In th...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the potential future impacts of climate change along the supply chain for highly traded fisheries products can inform choices to enhance future global seafood security. We examine the supply chains of the Australian tropical rock lobster fishery (TRL) and southern rock lobster fishery (SRL), with similar destination markets but differ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In order to respond to the threat and impacts of climate change, businesses need to devise and implement strategies that assist them to mitigate the exposure to risk as well as adapt to a changing operating environment. In agriculture, it is well-recognised that food supply and value chains are vulnerable to changes in weather, climate and extreme...
Article
Full-text available
This is an open access article which appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. This article is free for everyone to access, download and read. Any restrictions on use, including any restrictions on further reproduction and distribution, selling or licensing copies, or posting to personal, institutional or third party websites are defined by the...
Chapter
Full-text available
Climate change is impacting the oceans around Australia with significant warming of ocean temperatures, observed on both the east and west coasts. The response of wild fisheries and aquaculture sectors to climate change is an area of active investigation; however, the species and environment have received most attention. Supply chains are represent...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Research regarding climate change impacts and adaptation in primary industries has traditionally been focused on the production activities of individual sectors. Whilst there are a number of cases where impacts have been scaled from local to national and global scales, very few have employed a whole-of-systems approach to capture post farm gate val...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
At a global, national and local level climate change is increasingly of concern to government, businesses, communities and individuals given its potential impacts on future food security. Although there has been fairly widespread research into community response and attitudes to climate change, there is still limited understanding as to how consume...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is one of the most important issues confronting the sustainable supply of seafood, with projections suggesting major effects on wild and farmed fisheries worldwide. While climate change has been a consideration for Australian fisheries and aquaculture management, emphasis in both research and adaptation effort has been at the product...
Article
Full-text available
A theoretical basis is required for comparing key features and critical elements in wild fisheries and aquaculture supply chains under a changing climate. Here we develop a new quantitative metric that is analogous to indices used to analyse food-webs and identify key species. The Supply Chain Index (SCI) identifies critical elements as those eleme...
Article
Full-text available
The fact that most Australian native flowers are traded as opposed to marketed to overseas markets is possibly the reason behind the industry's inability to achieve its commercial potential. In an effort to improve their competitive position, a group of flower growers and an exporter approached the Centre for Native Floriculture to assist them in p...
Article
Full-text available
‘Adopt a consumer focus’ is the mantra that pervades the commercialisation strategies of horticultural products world-wide, but does this translate into practice in small and medium enterprises or is the process still production driven? Typically, new products in floriculture are modifications of existing products, which are introduced to existing...
Article
Full-text available
This report addresses the role of supply chain management as a business strategy in the development of five new rural industries in Australia - kangaroo, emu, asian vegetables, Australian native flowers and olives. It demonstrates that in new rural industries, firms with medium to high levels of supply chain management thinking, planning and implem...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Current and potential disruptions to Australian agriculture supply chains as a result of COVID-19, supply vulnerabilities, demand challenges and subsequent response.
Archived project
Climate change, and its associated climate variability, has significant impacts on the agrifood sector affecting the market availability of food and commodities, impacting on the viability and resilience of farms and their networks. Climate changes will increasingly be felt along the whole chain of companies that produce, handle, process and market agrifood products. Whole-of-chain approaches to adaptation and mitigation offer agrifood firms a system to remain competitive and deliver value to end consumers whilst also delivering measurable adaptation/mitigation benefits. There has been very little work in understanding how agrifood chains can collaboratively adapt to climate change with research instead focussed on on-farm responses. Using action learning and a participatory research approach, this project aims to answer: 1) how are value chains impacted by climate change and climate variability? 2) how can value chains effectively respond through adaptation and mitigation strategies? 3) what are the impacts of such responses to value creation and competitive advantages in value chains? This project is a collaborative effort between CSIRO, University of Queensland (UQ) and University of Tasmania (UTAS), and has been funded by the Department of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) through the Clean Energy Future Filling the Research Gap (Round 2) Fund.