Lian Malai Madsen

Lian Malai Madsen
University of Copenhagen · Nordic studies and linguistics

PhD

About

35
Publications
6,864
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660
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
488 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080

Publications

Publications (35)
Preprint
Full-text available
In this chapter we discuss languaging perspectives on language learning in the light of recent problematizations of (trans-)languaging pedagogies and their critical and emancipatory ideals (Jaspers & Madsen 2016). Languaging as concept refers to the practice of using language and (trans-)languaging pedagogies often emphasize how ideas of discrete b...
Chapter
Research combining an interest in linguistic practices, social identities and sport has a relatively short history, but sport has for a while been treated as a topic worth serious attention in social research, notably by sociologists such as Norbert Elias and Pierre Bourdieu. Their social theories have been highly influential within the sociology o...
Article
In this article, we carry out an ethnographically informed sociolinguistic analysis of language use in contemporary Danish rap. We contextualize our analytical observations by drawing on knowledge from interviews with stakeholders from the music industry and ethnographic fieldwork carried out among a group of young rappers. Based on this research,...
Article
The idea that there exist separate, enumerable languages has in the last decades been widely criticised, and it has led scholars to propose various new terms and concepts such as ‘polylingualism’, ‘metrolingualism’, and ‘translanguaging’, among others. As these terms are attracting considerable acclaim within the academy, this paper argues it is ti...
Article
Full-text available
Sociolinguists have recently suggested a range of new terms to re-conceptualise language and language use. Most of these are based on the empirical documentation of speakers using linguistically hybrid constructions which are understood as reflecting speakers’ orientation to norms of linguistic hybridity. In this article we bring data typical of SL...
Book
This book examines how young people at a martial arts club in an urban setting participate and interact in a recreational social community. The author relates analyses of their interactions to discussions of relevance to the sociology of sports, anthropology and education, ultimately providing an analytically nuanced contribution to the study of co...
Chapter
The language of young people is central in sociolinguistic research, as it is seen to be innovative and a primary source of knowledge about linguistic change and the role of language. This volume brings together a team of leading scholars to explore and compare linguistic practices of young people in multilingual urban spaces, with analyses ranging...
Chapter
The language of young people is central in sociolinguistic research, as it is seen to be innovative and a primary source of knowledge about linguistic change and the role of language. This volume brings together a team of leading scholars to explore and compare linguistic practices of young people in multilingual urban spaces, with analyses ranging...
Article
This article focuses on a case that compared to previous studies of hip hop language, is surprising; a group of adolescents in Copenhagen increasingly use more monolingual, standard linguistic practices in their hip hop productions on YouTube. We argue that to fully understand this development, it is necessary to take into account the local, socio-...
Chapter
Hip hop has been one of the most influential global forms of popular culture among youth during the past two decades (Bucholtz 2011), and it has received increasing attention in sociolinguistics, linguistic anthropology and educational studies. The studies of critical hip hop (language) pedagogies, in particular, has focused on hip hop as a means o...
Chapter
Observations of heteroglossic practices have led to questioning of the usefulness of the concepts of “language” or “variety” in research as well as pedagogy, and it has been argued that such concepts are representations of particular language ideologies rather than of linguistic practice. This chapter examines details of what voices are performed w...
Article
This article approaches on-going sociolinguistic processes in Copenhagen by focusing on the overt metalinguistic activities of a group of adolescents. The article sheds light on how social power differences are refracted in the metalinsguistic activities of these adolescents in spite of the relatively homogenous (or hegemonic) sociolinguistic condi...
Article
This article approaches on-going sociolinguistic processes in Copenhagen by focusing on the overt metalinguistic activities of a group of adolescents. The article sheds light on how social power differences are refracted in the metalinsguistic activities of these adolescents in spite of the relatively homogenous (or hegemonic) sociolinguistic condi...
Article
In this paper I focus on sequences of interaction among youth where the participants engage in classroom related activities (such as spelling, discussion of essays, etc.). My paper is based on interactional and ethnographic data collected among youth in two different leisure contexts. I discuss how the participants by employment of various interact...
Article
Humankind is a languaging species. This means that as human beings we use language to achieve our goals. Every time we use language, we change the world a little bit. We do so by using language with other human beings, language is in other words social. In this paper we challenge one of the most widely held views of language as a social, human phen...
Article
This paper deals with interactional dominance and power wielding in bilingual conversation among school children. I find that different pragmatic strategies are used by bilingual children as a mean of negotiating power relationships and identities but that the social relations and the power bases brought into the conversations by the interactants m...
Article
From an ethnographic and interaction analytical approach this paper examines how polylingual languaging is used by a group of young male Taekwondo fighters to construct an integrated streetwise and ‘schoolwise’ persona as well as negotiate regional identities. The data discussed were collected in a Taekwondo club in a multicultural area of Copenhag...
Article
The study concerns the linguistic power wielding in group conversations among bilingual children and adolescents. In bilingual conversations one of the pragmatic linguistic means of negotiating power relations and identities is of course the choice of language. This is also the main subject of the study of Jørgensen (1993) who presents a view on th...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Funded by The Joint Committee for Nordic Research Councils in the Humanities and Social Sciences (NOS-HS), this project explores the sociolinguistics of multilingualism in Denmark, Finland and Sweden. The original application was titled ”Contact zones in the Nordic countries: multilingualism, mobility, and diversifying diversity”, and included scholars from the University of Jyväskylä, the University of Copenhagen and Stockholm University. Responding to the goals of the project, workshops were organized (2017–2020) in Copenhagen, Stockholm and Jyväskylä, engaging the following invited discussants and plenary speakers: Professor Karel Arnaut, Professor Monica Heller and Professor Brigitta Busch. Insights gained through that work materialized eventually in a special issue — ”Spaces of upset in the Nordic region: Sociolinguistics beyond cohesion and consensus in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden” — to appear in the May issue of the International Journal of the Sociology of Language (no 275, edited by Salö, Karlander, Leppänen & Westinen). The following scholars were included in the original application. From the University of Jyväskylä team: Sirpa Leppänen (grant holder) Samu Kytölä, Elina Westinen, Saija Peuronen, Piia Jäntti, and Sonya Sahradyan. From the University of Copenhagen team: Janus Spindler Møller, Martha Karrebæk, Lian Malai Madsen Andreas Stæhr, Thomas Rørbeck Nørreby, and Astrid Ag. From the Stockholm University team: Christopher Stroud, Caroline Kerfoot, Natalia Ganuza, Linus Salö, David Karlander, and Linnea Hanell. Other scholars, e.g. Heini Lehtonen, Maria Rydell, Marta Kirilova and Luke Holmes and others, joined in as the project proceeded.