Li Chu

Li Chu
Stanford University | SU · Department of Psychology

Ph.D. in Psychology
Check out my YouTube channel that discusses common psychological myths (https://www.youtube.com/c/psychologyfellows)

About

15
Publications
1,809
Reads
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76
Citations
Introduction
Li (Leigh) Chu is a postdoctoral researcher working with Dr. Laura Carstensen at Stanford University. She is most intrigued by topics relating to aging, curiosity and learning motivation. She completed her Ph.D. in Psychology with Dr. Helene Fung at Chinese University of Hong Kong and her B.A. at University of British Columbia. She has also collaborated with Dr. Christiane Hoppmann (UBC), Dr. Su-ling Yeh (NTU) and Dr. Nancy Pachana (UQ). Leigh is also a co-founder of "心理學人 Psychology Fellows".
Additional affiliations
November 2020 - present
Stanford University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
August 2016 - June 2020
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Field of study
  • Psychology
September 2011 - June 2016

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Background: With global aging, robots are considered a promising solution for handling the shortage of aged care and companionships. However, these technologies would serve little purpose if their intended users do not accept them. While the socioemotional selectivity theory predicts that older adults would accept robots that offer emotionally mea...
Article
Understanding older adults' attitude toward robots has become increasingly important as robots have been introduced in various settings, such as retirement homes. We investigated whether there are age differences in both implicit and explicit attitudes toward robots after interacting with an assistive robot. Twenty-four younger and 24 older adults...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to examine the underlying mechanism behind the association of age and intellectual curiosity. Previous studies generally showed a negative association between age and intellectual curiosity. To shed light on this association, we hypothesize that older adults become more selective in where they invest their curiosity compared with y...
Article
Background and Objectives Older adults might be less information-seeking in comparison to younger adults. Yet, when a crisis hits, rather than relying on only a few information sources, it is important for people to gather information from a variety of different sources. With more information sources, people are more likely to obtain a more realist...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Curiosity, or the desire for novel information and/or experience, is associated with improved well-being and more informed decisions, which has implications on older adults' (OAs') adoption of novel technologies. There have been suggestions that curiosity tends to decline with age. However, it was rarely studied under specific contexts...
Article
Objectives: Negative attitudes towards ageing have been associated with poor mental well-being, and protective factors are not well-understood. This study examined the relationship between ageing attitudes and symptoms of anxiety and depression, and the potential moderating effect of age, and buffering effects of social support, physical activity a...
Article
Objectives. Physical distancing to reduce the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 has increased alone time, with unintended mental health ramifications including increased loneliness, which may be particularly detrimental for older adults. We investigated time-varying associations between daily time to oneself and loneliness, and the role of eve...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Socioemotional selectivity theory proposes that older adults engage in less information-seeking than younger adults as future time perspective becomes more limited and expansive goals are prioritized less. However, gathering information is crucial in emergencies like the COVID-19 pandemic, especially for older adults, who are particularly vulnerabl...
Article
Full-text available
Is feeling curious a pleasant, anxious or mixed feeling experience? Dual process theory posits that curiosity results from an optimal level of knowledge gap anxiety. Yet, personal growth facilitation model suggests that people are intrinsically curious, which is associated with positive affects. While curiosity may be pleasant or anxious, it may al...
Article
With global aging, it is crucial to understand how older adults and the process of aging are viewed by members of society. These attitudes can often influence how older adults are treated. Since the Journal of Gerontology was founded, we have gained increasing insights into attitudes toward aging, with several notable research developments, includi...
Article
Full-text available
Curiosity is commonly defined as “the desire for new information and experience.” While curiosity has been associated with numerous positive outcomes (e.g., improved well-being, better cognitive performance and longer life expectancy, some studies suggested that curiosity declined with age. However, very few studies actually attempt to examine why...
Article
Full-text available
Being curious has various physical, social and psychological benefits. However, theories like the socioemotional selectivity theory suggest that information seeking goals tend to be overshadowed by emotionally meaningful goals with age. Personality and social psychology research also found consistent decline of curiosity in later adulthood. In cont...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Prior studies have found that as people age, they value low-arousal positive affect (LAP) to a greater extent and high-arousal positive affect (HAP) to a lower extent. We aimed to investigate whether actually achieving those ideal affects was related to better well-being outcomes, measured in terms of meaning in life. Methods: Using...
Chapter
Cognitive processing of social and nonsocial information changes with age. These processes range from the ones that serve “mere” cognitive functions, such as recall strategies and reasoning, to those that serve functions that pertain to self-regulation and relating to others. However, aging and the development of social cognition unfold in differen...

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