Lewis Mates

Lewis Mates
Durham University | DU · School of Government and International Affairs

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45
Publications
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91
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Introduction

Publications

Publications (45)
Article
Full-text available
The history and iconography of trade union banners has been surprisingly under-explored since it was first taken seriously as a subject of study in the early 1970s. The nostalgia evident in these early accounts for an age that seemed to contemporaries then to be fleeting seems particularly incongruous given the more recent reinvigoration of the tra...
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This article examines the implications of the transition to online or blended learning for first generation scholars (FGS) brought about by Covid-19. We present the findings of a mixed methods project that draws data from both in-depth qualitative interviews and a large quantitative survey of students at Durham University. We offer a comparative an...
Article
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The literature on a ‘sense of place’ often sidelines the voices of children. Consequently, little is known about how children can be encouraged to develop a sense of place. This matters because a sense of place involves feelings of belonging and attachment, and can contribute to children’s wellbeing and identity. Informed by the research of Bartos...
Article
This article considers the use of trade union banners as tools for mainstream education in the context of the recent reclamation, recuperation, and rearticulation of industrial heritage taking place in localities in the former Durham coalfield, north-east England. It does so by focusing on the educational work undertaken by the Follonsby Miner’s Ba...
Article
This article presents the findings of research into the teaching of local industrial history in a socially deprived primary school in post-industrial north-east England. The first of the article’s three substantive sections sets out the methodology and rationale. The second, drawing on qualitative data from participant observation, semi-structured...
Article
The UK coalition government introduced the Community Organisers Programme in 2010, providing state funding to train community organizers in England for the first time. This article presents a case study in the north of England, exploring the implementation of the programme. It illustrates the challenges and contradictions faced by trainee community...
Chapter
This chapter addresses the complex interplay of disunities on three main levels; intra-organisational, inter-organisational and between labour organisations and spontaneous working-class protests. It does so by examining the struggle for control of the well-established and influential Durham Miners’ Association’ as a case study. It firstly consider...
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This chapter examines the developing challenge of the DFM and syndicalists in the year before the outbreak of war. Unprecedented coal production and high prices rendered summer 1913 more tranquil. When the DMA leadership launched a series of meetings over grievances the DFM had championed, the movement had to justify itself. In this context Romer’s...
Chapter
This chapter considers the re-emergence of the demand for a miners’ minimum wage and the origins and activities of a growing rank-and-file movement in the Durham coalfield advocating it. It begins by examining the context of summer 1911 and the influence of South Wales syndicalist miners in bringing their call for a minimum wage to Durham and how a...
Chapter
This chapter analyses the first year of a more concretely organised rank-and-file movement that emerged from the earlier minimum wage campaign; the Durham Forward Movement (DFM). It starts by delineating the DFM’s aims to improve the minimum wage award, reduce its restrictive rules and bring in those grades of miners not already included in the min...
Chapter
This chapter introduces the main areas of historiographical debate. After a brief general outline of the period it goes on to analyse the literature on the “Great Labour Unrest” and syndicalism and then the debates around the rise of Labour. A fourth section examines the specific mining literature and develops the book’s rationale, arguing for the...
Chapter
This chapter provides the crucial contextual background to understanding the more detailed narrative from 1910 developed in subsequent chapters. It begins by examining the economic contexts; the highly diverse coal mining workforce in Durham, and the extensive and complex wage bargaining machinery that had developed there. Secondly, considers these...
Chapter
The conclusion ties together the main elements of the argument. The DFM, though comparatively unsuccessful in material terms, proved a highly effective vehicle in propelling a grouping of generally younger ILP activists to the top positions inside the DMA: in 1915, two of the main DFM leaders were elected to replace the now deceased Liberal general...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the strife provoked in the coalfield by the DMA leaders’ signing of the Eight Hours Agreement, to enact the requirements of the Eight Hours Act. The Agreement allowed the owners to extend the ‘drawing time’ of coal and implement the highly unpopular three-shift system. Even more controversially, the miners’ leaders had given...
Book
The Great Labour Unrest examines the struggle between liberals, socialists and revolutionary syndicalists for control of Britain's best established district miners' union. Drawing widely on a vast and rich body of primary sources, this study reveals the debates that grassroots activists had during the fascinating and turbulent 'Great Labour Unrest'...
Article
This article examines political change in the Durham Miners' Association (D.M.A.), one of the best-established, largest and most influential Edwardian trade unions. It argues that the hitherto ignored rank-and-file movements (especially the Durham Forward Movement from May 1912) deserve a central explanatory role in offering new perspectives on the...
Article
It is well known the membership of British Conservative Party in the 1950s dwarfed that of other parties, but despite this there has been very little examination of the party's grassroots in this crucial period. What literature there is comes predominantly from the top-down focus of national politics and revolves around four disputed images. Firstl...
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For the first two decades of the twentieth century, syndicalism (revolutionary trade unionism) was the most vigorous of the left's challenges to the capitalist order in many parts of the world. In Britain, syndicalism was reckoned to have had most impact in the South Wales coalfield but there have been no detailed studies of its influence in other...
Article
Capture-recapture methods are of general interest because they can be applied to conventional historical sources to address otherwise intractable questions about the size and dynamics of historical populations. When employed to assess alternative explanations for the long-term trajectory of party activism in Britain—based on data drawn from the Sou...
Chapter
Full-text available
The British ‘labour revolt’ immediately before the outbreak of the First World War saw millions of working days lost in strike action and the mushrooming of trade unions. This unrest, which included the first British national miners’ strike in 1912, coincided with a growth in revolutionary agitation. The emergence of syndicalist ideas, essentially...
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This article examines the Popular Front campaigns in 1938 and 1939 at grassroots level. It does this by taking the North-East region as a case study. The north-eastern labour movement was traditionally moderate and loyal. Substantial support for the policy in regions like the North-East was vital if the labour movement as a whole could be won over...
Article
The Encyclopedia of Cremation is the first major reference resource focused on cremation. Spanning many world cultures it documents regional histories, ideological movements and leading individuals that fostered cremation whilst also presenting cremation as a universal practice. Tracing ancient and classical cremation sites, historical and contempo...
Chapter
Full-text available
‘When the fighting broke out on 18 July [1936] it is probable that every anti-Fascist in Europe felt a thrill of hope. For here, at last, apparently, was democracy standing up to Fascism. For years past the so-called democratic countries had been surrendering to Fascism at every step. […] It seemed — possibly it was — the turning of the tide.’1 So...
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Though historians have generally regarded the British popular front (1935-9) as a failure, it has been suggested that the project had untapped potential. Most significantly, the geographically widespread and socially and politically diverse campaigns in support of the Spanish Republic in its struggle against a military rebellion (1936-9) have been...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Edited volume - Discussions about the unity of the British labour movement and about the foundations, the limits or even the desirability of such unity are not in themselves new. Yet the current crisis inside the Labour Party which follows from Jeremy Corbyn’s election as party leader in September 2015 – accelerated by the impact of the 23 June 2016 Brexit referendum result - has made a number of concerns that seemed outmodish topical again and rekindled academic and practioners’ interest in organisational matters.