Letizia Amodeo

Letizia Amodeo
Ghent University | UGhent · Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology

MA in Psychology (Neuroscience)

About

4
Publications
849
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Citations
Introduction
The aim of my PhD is to identify which features of self-processing are specifically altered in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). My research interests cover different aspects of self processing, how these features may relate to social impairments in ASD and which are their neurobiological underpinnings. Furthermore, I am also interested in experiential approaches to emotion regulation.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - present
Ghent University
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Research topic: 'Understanding self-processing in Autism Spectrum Disorder through a neurocognitive approach'
February 2019 - May 2019
Ghent University
Position
  • Intern
Description
  • Statistical analyses using previously-collected dataset from emotion regulation neuroimaging study.
Education
October 2017 - July 2019
Università degli Studi di Trento
Field of study
  • Neuroscience
October 2014 - July 2017
University of Trieste
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
Background: The ‘self-bias’ – i.e., the human proneness to preferentially process self-relevant stimuli – is thought to be important for both self-related and social processing. Previous research operationalized the self-bias using different paradigms, assessing the size of the self-bias within a single cognitive domain. Recent studies suggested a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: The ‘self-bias’ – i.e., the human proneness to preferentially process self-relevant stimuli – is thought to be important for both self-related and social processing. Previous research operationalized the self-bias using different paradigms, assessing the size of the self-bias within a single cognitive domain. Recent studies suggested a...
Article
Full-text available
According to psychoanalysis, anxiety signals a threat whenever a forbidden feeling emerges. Anxiety triggers defenses and maladaptive behaviors, thus leading to clinical problems. For these reasons, anxiety regulation is a core aspect of psychodynamic-oriented treatments to help their clients. In the present theoretical paper, we review and discuss...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this article is to present recent applications of emotion regulation theory and methods to the field of psychotherapy. The term Emotion Regulation refers to the neurocognitive mechanisms by which we regulate the onset, strength, and the eventual expression of our emotions. Deficits in the regulation of emotions have been linked to most,...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Perceiving ourselves as unified is fundamental to psychological functioning and may influence how the surrounding environment is processed. The so-called “egocentric/self-bias” – advantaged processing for self-relevant stimuli – is believed to foster social competence. Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) experience persistent social difficulties, which may relate to an atypical sense of self. However, research findings are still inconsistent: several studies suggested a reduced or absent self-bias in ASD, whereas others did not observe differences in self-processing between individuals with ASD and neurotypicals. Moreover, research is lacking in exploring self-biases across different cognitive domains: distinct self-related aspects have been studied separately so far, and self-biases magnitude has been mostly assessed within cognitive domains. Therefore, the goal of the present study is to investigate self-biases across perception, memory and attention, by comparing three well-established self-processing measures, i.e., the shape-label matching task (perceptual domain), the trait adjectives task (memory domain), and the visual search task (attentional domain), within the same experimental procedure. We intend to explore whether self-biases in the different cognitive domains are related, emerging as a result of a common, underlying mechanism, or instead consist in distinct, unrelated effects. Furthermore, associations with ASD symptomatology (10-item AQ, SRS-A) as well as self-consciousness (SCS-R) will be examined.