Leslie Reeder-Myers

Leslie Reeder-Myers
Temple University | TU · Department of Anthropology

PhD

About

43
Publications
17,504
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
959
Citations
Citations since 2017
23 Research Items
661 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Introduction
Leslie Reeder-Myers currently works at the Department of Anthropology, Temple University.

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
Full-text available
Historical ecology has revolutionized our understanding of fisheries and cultural landscapes, demonstrating the value of historical data for evaluating the past, present, and future of Earth’s ecosystems. Despite several important studies, Indigenous fisheries generally receive less attention from scholars and managers than the 17th–20th century ca...
Article
Full-text available
Archaeologists have long emphasized the importance of large-scale excavations and multi-year or even decades-long projects at a single site or site complex. Here, we highlight archaeological field strategies, termed coring, profiling, and trenching (CPT), that rely on relatively small-scale excavations or the collection of new samples from intact d...
Article
Full-text available
During the last 10 years, we have learned a great deal about the potential for a coastal peopling of the Americas and the importance of marine resources in early economies. Despite research at a growing number of terminal Pleistocene archaeological sites on the Pacific Coast of the Americas, however, important questions remain about the lifeways of...
Article
Full-text available
The island laboratory concept has long been an important construct in island archaeology, with an emphasis on human biogeography and issues of isolation, connectivity, interaction, evolution, and extinction. The Pacific Coast of Alta and Baja California contains several offshore islands that offer a framework for evaluating a variety of cultural an...
Chapter
The productive woodlands, estuaries, and coastlines of the Middle Atlantic region of North America have been home to Native Americans from the Paleoindian period to the modern day. Inhabitants of this region adapted to broad environmental changes, including the emergence of Chesapeake Bay when rising seas drowned the Susquehanna River valley around...
Chapter
From the icy shores of Labrador to the warm mangroves of the Florida Keys, North America’s Atlantic Coast was a magnet for human subsistence and settlement for millennia. North America’s Atlantic Coast is a land of diversity united by rich coastal and terrestrial ecosystems that were home to a wide variety of Native American societies and distinct...
Article
Late Pleistocene estuaries, palaeoecology and humans on North America's Pacific Coast - Volume 93 Issue 372 - Jon Erlandson, Torben Rick, Amira Ainis, Todd Braje, Kristina Gill, Leslie Reeder-Myers
Article
Full-text available
Since the collapse of the Clovis-first model of the peopling of the Americas some 30 years ago, there has been growing interest in the Pacific Coast as a potential early human dispersal corridor. With postglacial eustatic sea level rise inundating most New World paleoshorelines older than ~7000 years, however, locating terminal Pleistocene sites al...
Article
Full-text available
Forty years ago, Knut Fladmark (1979) argued that the Pacific Coast offered a viable alternative to the ice-free corridor model for the initial peopling of the Americas—one of the first to support a “coastal migration theory” that remained marginal for decades. Today, the pre-Clovis occupation at the Monte Verde site is widely accepted, several oth...
Article
Kayak surveys in estuarine environments: addressing sea-level rise and climate change - Volume 93 Issue 370 - Leslie A. Reeder-Myers, Torben C. Rick
Article
Full-text available
Archaeobotanical remains recovered from a large ∼8000-year-old-shell midden (CA-SRI-666) on Santa Rosa Island provide the first ancient plant data from this large island, shedding light on ancient patterns of plant use, subsistence, and sedentism. Faunal data from shell midden samples retrieved from three site loci contain evidence for harvesting o...
Chapter
Worldwide, prehistoric hunter-gatherers and horticulturalists translocated a variety of animals and plants to islands. Translocations enhanced island ecosystems, introducing animals and plants used for food or raw materials. We review recent zooarchaeology, genetics, and stable isotope data to evaluate the evidence for ancient translocations to the...
Article
Powerful hurricanes in 2017—Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria—were stark examples of how these previously rare catastrophes are becoming increasingly normal due to climate change, with dire consequences for cultural resources. These storms, sometimes called megastorms or superstorms, were the first in which high-resolution satellite imagery was av...
Article
Full-text available
The submersion of Late Pleistocene shorelines and poor organic preservation at many early archaeological sites obscure the earliest effects of humans on coastal resources in the Americas. We used collagen fingerprinting to identify bone fragments from middens at four California Channel Island sites that are among the oldest coastal sites in the Ame...
Article
Chesapeake Bay is home to highly productive marine ecosystems that were a key part of Native American subsistence for millennia. Despite a number of archaeological projects focused on Chesapeake Bay prehistory, key questions remain about the nature of human use of the estuary through time and across space. Recent work at 7 shell middens on the Rhod...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research on agriculture in the American Southwest focuses overwhelmingly on archaeological survey methods to discern surface agricultural features, which, in combination with climatological, geological, and geographical variables, are used to create models about agricultural productivity in the past. However, with few exceptions, the role...
Article
Viewing the Future in the Past: Historical Ecology Applications to Environmental Issues. THOMAS FOSTER , LISA PACIULLI , and DAVID GOLDSTEIN . 2016. University of South Carolina Press, Columbia. xiv + 172 pp. $34.95 (hardback), ISBN 978-1-61117-586-8. - Leslie Reeder-Myers
Article
Full-text available
Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States and is famous for its once extensive and now severely degraded eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) populations, along with a number of other important fisheries including crabs, rockfish, and menhaden. Here we explore the historical ecology of Native American subsistence and land use str...
Article
Significance Oysters are important organisms in estuaries around the world, influencing water quality, constructing habitat, and providing food for humans and wildlife. Following over a century of overfishing, pollution, disease, and habitat degradation, oyster populations in the Chesapeake Bay and elsewhere have declined dramatically. Despite prov...
Article
Blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus), an important commercial and ecological species in the eastern United States, are a key part of Chesapeake Bay culture, tourism, and fisheries. Blue crab remains are rare in Middle Atlantic North American archaeological sites, however, leading to speculation that Native Americans did not eat crabs, that taphonomic p...
Article
Full-text available
Twenty-first-century global warming poses a significant threat to the cultural heritage of coastal regions, but the effects of sea-level rise and changing weather patterns will not be evenly distributed. In addition, continued urban, agricultural, and industrial development concentrated in coastal areas contributes to the destruction of cultural re...
Article
Sea-level rise during the late Pleistocene and early Holocene inundated nearshore areas in many parts of the world, producing drastic changes in local ecosystems and obscuring significant portions of the archeological record. Although global forces are at play, the effects of sea-level rise are highly localized due to variability in glacial isostat...
Article
Full-text available
We describe three Late Paleocoastal shell middens recently identified on Santa Cruz Island, dated between ∼8800 and 8450 cal yr BP. Exposed and threatened by coastal erosion, the sites are located along the front edge of a raised marine terrace, buried beneath 2–3 m of alluvium. Situated along a broad sandy beach today, the sites were situated ∼600...
Article
Systematic radiocarbon dating of coastal shell middens is a useful method for obtaining basic chronological information about archaeological sites that are threatened by coastal erosion, or for conducting reconnaissance in an area where little is known about the settlement history. This study focuses on radiocarbon dating of archaeological sites ac...
Article
Hunter-gatherer decisions about where to live were influenced by many behaviors, some easier to see in the archaeological record (i.e. hunting or trapping vertebrates, gathering shellfish, quarrying and flint knapping) and some more difficult (i.e. gathering and processing plants, environmental variability, spiritual meaning, social relationships)....
Article
North America's Atlantic Coast has been a focus of human settlement and subsistence for millennia, but sea-level rise, sedimentation, and other processes pose significant challenges for archaeological research. Radiocarbon dating of 31 shell middens near the Rhode River Estuary, Maryland provides an opportunity to evaluate human land use, settlemen...
Article
Full-text available
Historical ecology is becoming an important focus in conservation biology and offers a promising tool to help guide ecosystem management. Here, we integrate data from multiple disciplines to illuminate the past, present, and future of biodiversity on California's Channel Islands, an archipelago that has undergone a wide range of land-use and ecolog...
Article
Full-text available
The Chumash village of Qshiwqshiw, located on eastern Santa Rosa Island, is described in ethnographic sources as one of the largest Chumash villages on the northern Channel Islands, with 4 chiefs and 119 baptisms according to mission records. The village is thought to correlate with 2 archaeological sites (CA-SRI-85 and CA-SRI-87) that contain larg...
Article
Full-text available
To evaluate coastal settlement and land use strategies among maritime hunter-gatherers, we analyzed oxygen isotope (δ18O) data from 131 marine carbonate samples from 21 California mussel (Mytilus californianus) shells obtained from a large ∼8,200-year-old shell midden (CA-SRI-666) on California’s Santa Rosa Island. Seasonal distributions of the iso...
Article
Full-text available
The northern Pacific Coast is an important area for understanding human colonization of the Americas, but Late Pleistocene coastal sites are rare and interglacial sea level rise has inundated the continental shelf and the primary areas where Paleocoastal archaeological sites are likely to occur. Here we outline a terrestrial archaeological survey p...
Article
Full-text available
The northern Pacific Coast is an important area for understanding human colonization of the Americas, but Late Pleistocene coastal sites are rare and interglacial sea level rise has inundated the continental shelf and the primary areas where Paleocoastal archaeological sites are likely to occur. Here we outline a terrestrial archaeological survey p...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal archaeological resources around the world often coincide with dense contemporary human populations and a rapidly changing physical environment. Projected sea level rise and urban expansion during the 21st century threaten to destroy much of our global coastal archaeological heritage. In this study, we adapt an environmental vulnerability an...
Article
Full-text available
On the Pacific Coast of the United States and Baja California, the Younger Dryas was one component of dynamic Late Pleistocene and Holocene environmental changes. Changing climate, sea level rise, and shifting shorelines created ecological challenges for ancient coastal peoples and daunting challenges for archaeologists searching for early coastal...
Article
Full-text available
Three archaeological sites on California’s Channel Islands show that Paleoindians relied heavily on marine resources. The Paleocoastal sites, dated between ~12,200 and 11,200 years ago, contain numerous stemmed projectile points and crescents associated with a variety of marine and aquatic faunal remains. At site CA-SRI-512 on Santa Rosa Island, Pa...
Article
Full-text available
California's Channel Islands have emerged as an important location for documenting the cultures and lifeways of the earliest peoples who settled the Pacific Coast of North America. Much of this began with Phil Orr's archaeological, paleontological, and geological research on Santa Rosa Island from the 1940s to 1960s. Generating several controversia...
Article
Our analysis of 511 chipped stone artifacts from a deflated Late Holocene site on San Miguel Island provides insight into the nature of Island Chumash technology and exchange. Although numerous studies have been conducted on Channel Island stone tool assemblages, relatively little is known about the chipped stone technologies of San Miguel Island,...

Network

Cited By