Leonie Seabrook

Leonie Seabrook
The University of Queensland | UQ · School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

PhD

About

73
Publications
24,261
Reads
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2,243
Citations
Additional affiliations
December 2011 - present
The University of Queensland
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (73)
Article
Full-text available
Conservation planning and population assessment for widely-distributed, but vulnerable, arboreal folivore species demands cost-effective mapping of habitat suitability over large areas. This study tested whether multispectral data from WorldView-3 could be used to estimate and map foliar digestible nitrogen (DigN), a nutritional measure superior to...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation planning and population assessment for widely-distributed, but vulnerable, arboreal folivore species demands cost-effective mapping of habitat suitability over large areas. This study tested whether multispectral data from WorldView-3 could be used to estimate and map foliar digestible nitrogen (DigN), a nutritional measure superior to...
Article
The continuing use of petrochemicals in mineral nitrogen (N) production may be affected by supply or cost issues and climate agreements. Without mineral N, a larger area of cropland is required to produce the same amount of food, impacting biodiversity. Alternative N sources include solar and wind to power the Haber-Bosch process, and the organic o...
Article
Full-text available
Sustainability challenges rarely align with the conventional boundaries of our disciplines, institutions and means of communication. To address these challenges amid real-world complexity, we need to think holistically and collaborate across disciplines. In this paper, we synthesise three themes: (1) more integrated conceptual frameworks; (2) digit...
Article
Full-text available
The equatorial island of Borneo is a deforestation hotspot. However, the influence of forest loss on the island's climate remains largely unexplored. Here, we examine how forest loss is related to changes in ground-based records of temperature (1961–2007) and precipitation (1951–2007), and MODIS data for temperature (2002–2016). Analyses were perfo...
Article
Deforestation threatens the earth's biodiversity and the ecosystem services upon which humans depend. Formal regulation is a key mechanism by which governments seek to protect forests. However, whether regulation can effectively protect remaining areas of the most threatened and most heavily cleared forests is unknown. We addressed this question us...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT Context Infectious diseases are important in the dynamics of wildlife populations, but there is limited understanding of how landscape change influences susceptibility to disease. Objectives We aimed to quantify the time-delayed influence of spatial and temporal components of landscape chaLandscape Ecologynge and climate variability on th...
Article
Land clearing threatens biodiversity, impairs the functioning of terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecosystems, and is a key contributor to human-induced climate change. The rates of land clearing in the State of Queensland, Australia, are at globally significant levels, and have been the subject of intense and polarised political debate. In 2016,...
Poster
Full-text available
Competition for land resources has become intense. This trend has led to substantial concerns about intensifying land-use and environmental pressures including biodiversity loss. In Europe, the primary cause of biodiversity loss is agricultural intensification, which threatens farmland and grassland species. Thus debate around land management for t...
Article
Full-text available
Land clearing is on the rise in Queensland and New South Wales, with land clearing laws being fiercely debated. In Queensland in 2013–14, 278,000 hectares of native vegetation were cleared (1.2 times the size of the Australian Capital Territory). A further 296,000ha were cleared in 2014–15. These are the highest rates of deforestation in the devel...
Article
Ecological restoration of modified and degraded landscapes is an important challenge for the 21st century, with potential for major gains in the recovery of biodiversity. However, there is a general lack of agreement between plant- and animal- based approaches to restoration, both in theory and practice. Here, we review these approaches, identify l...
Article
Global biodiversity continues to decline at a steady rate, especially in Australia where 10% of the land mammal population has become extinct since European settlement. The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act (EPBC) list of threatened species is Australia's version of the IUCN red-list; however, not all species fit easily withi...
Article
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Many ecologists and environmental scientists witnessing the scale of current environmental change are becoming increasingly alarmed about how humanity is pushing the boundaries of the Earth’s systems beyond sustainable levels. The world urgently needs global society to redirect itself toward a more sustainable future: one that moves intergeneration...
Article
Forest vertebrate fauna provide critical services, such as pollination and seed dispersal, which underpin functional and resilient ecosystems. In turn, many of these fauna are dependent on the flowering phenology of the plant species that constitute such ecosystems. The impact of changes in climate, including climate extremes, on the interaction be...
Article
Species, particularly foliovores, at the trailing edge of their geographical range are likely to be most vulnerable to climate change as they respond to physiological stress and the decline in the nutrient richness of their food source. We investigate the effect of environmental conditions on diet composition, resource use, and physiological stress...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that the ecology of stress has hitherto been neglected, but it is in fact an important influence on the distribution and numbers of wild vertebrates. Environmental changes have the potential to cause physiological stress that can affect population dynamics. Detailed information on the influence of environmental variables o...
Article
Full-text available
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/342/6157/425.summary Despite a global political commitment to reduce biodiversity loss by 2010 through the 2002 Convention on Biological Diversity, declines are accelerating and threats are increasing. Major threats to biodiversity are habitat loss, invasion by exotic species and pathogens, and climate change, all...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation strategies derived from research carried out in one part of the range of a widely distributed species and then uniformly applied over multiple regions risk being ineffective due to regional variations in species-habitat relationships. This is particularly true at the edge of the range where information on animal movements and resource...
Article
Environmental changes result in physiological responses of organisms, which can adversely affect population dynamics and reduce resistance to disease. These changes are expressed in chronic levels of stress. Measuring glucocorticoid (GC) concentration in faeces is a non-invasive method for monitoring stress in wildlife. Metabolism and excretion of...
Chapter
The need to avert unacceptable and irreversible environmental change is one of the most urgent challenges facing society. Landscape ecology has the capacity to help address these challenges by providing spatially-explicit solutions to landscape sustainability problems. However, despite a large body of research, the real impact of landscape ecology...
Article
Abstract The conservation of any species requires understanding and predicting the distribution of its habitat and resource use, including the effects of scale-dependent variation in habitat and resource quality. Consequently, testing for resource selection at the appropriate scales is critical.We investigated how the resource selection process var...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat loss and natural catastrophes reduce the resources available to animals. Species can persist if they have access to additional resources and habitats through the processes of landscape complementation and supplementation. In arid and semi-arid ecosystems, where productivity is limited by precipitation, the impact of landscape change and pro...
Article
The conservation of any species requires understanding and predicting the distribution of its habitat and resource use, including the effects of scale-dependent variation in habitat and resource quality. Consequently, testing for resource selection at the appropriate scales is critical.We investigated how the resource selection process varies acros...
Article
AimClimate change is predicted to adversely affect wildlife populations at the trailing edge of their range, with extreme weather events acting as a catalyst for local extinctions and range contractions. We assessed the relative importance of long-term climate averages, short-term drought and habitat in predicting species occupancy and range edge,...
Article
Full-text available
Context Habitat thresholds are the critical point(s), below which the probability of occurrence of a species declines. Identifying thresholds assists land managers to decide how much habitat is needed to conserve a species. However, for any given species, a threshold may not exist, or might occur at one scale but not at others, and it may differ ac...
Article
Human-induced landscape change associated with habitat loss and fragmentation places wildlife populations at risk. One issue in these landscapes is a change in the prevalence of disease which may result in increased mortality and reduced fecundity. Our understanding of the influence of habitat loss and fragmentation on the prevalence of wildlife di...
Article
Full-text available
Context. Global climate change will lead to increased climate variability, including more frequent drought and heatwaves, in many areas of the world. This will affect the distribution and numbers of wildlife populations. In south-west Queensland, anecdotal reports indicated that a low density but significant koala population had been impacted by dr...
Article
Aim To develop and test a general framework for estimating weed invasion potential (suitability and susceptibility) that utilized expert knowledge of dispersal, establishment and persistence and considered the influence of land management. Location The semi-arid Desert Channels Region of Queensland, Australia (476,000 km2). Methods We developed a g...
Article
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Land use is a pervasive influence on most terrestrial ecosystems. Humans are converting natural ecosys-tems and appropriating an increasingly large portion of the net primary productivity of the Earth's eco-systems, leaving a rapidly expanding footprint on the environment and threatening the functioning of ecosystems and the ecological services the...
Article
Full-text available
Land use is a pervasive influence on most terrestrial ecosystems. Humans are converting natural ecosystems and appropriating an increasingly large portion of the net primary productivity of the Earth’s ecosystems, leaving a rapidly expanding footprint on the environment and threatening the functioning of ecosystems and the ecological services they...
Article
Full-text available
While population growth is widely acknowledged as an important driver of land cover change, the role of unplanned human settlements is not adequately recognised. Many such settlements occur in the semi-arid lands of Kenya, which in the past had relatively lower human populations, but significant wildlife populations. Over the last four decades, the...
Article
Full-text available
While population growth is widely acknowledged as an important driver of land cover change, the role of unplanned human settlements is not adequately recognised. Many such settlements occur in the semiarid lands of Kenya, which in the past had relatively lower human populations, but significant wildlife populations. Over the last four decades, the...
Chapter
Full-text available
In 2009, one of us (CM) had the fortunate opportunity of attending Copenhagen COP15 as an observer, representing The University of Queensland. Despite high hopes, there was little concrete action arising out of COP15 (COP is Conference of the Parties). In light of this outcome, and the recent Cancun Agreement at COP16, this paper will discuss the i...
Article
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Climate change policies currently focus on reducing the concentration of industrial atmospheric greenhouse gases due to burning fossil fuels and deforestation, but pay limited attention to feedbacks between the land surface and the climate system. In tropical and subtropical regions, forests and woodlands play an important role in the climate syste...
Article
In rural regions, land use changes (LUC) are often the result of the decision-making of individual farmers. To influence this decision-making, compulsory and voluntary mechanisms are implemented. However, farmers' decision-making is a heterogeneous process that depends on their ability and willingness to take certain decisions. Discrepancies betwee...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change policies currently focus on reducing the concentration of industrial atmospheric greenhouse gases due to burning fossil fuels and deforestation, but pay limited attention to feedbacks between the land surface and the climate system. In tropical and subtropical regions, forests and woodlands play an important role in the climate syste...
Article
Full-text available
The need to avert unacceptable and irreversible environmental change is the most urgent challenge facing society. Landscape ecology has the capacity to help address these challenges by providing spatially-explicit solutions to landscape sustainability problems. However, despite a large body of research, the real impact of landscape ecology on susta...
Article
Migration is a major household survival option for both the rich and the poor in many developing countries. In rural Kenya, access to land for the poor is fundamental to their survival, with lack of access often resulting in migration. The Chyulu Hills settlements are in a remote region bordering two protected areas, the Tsavo and the Chyulu Hills...
Article
In Burning off, Dorothea MacKellar, author of My country, celebrates the destruction of native bushland as a great and old tree becomes A red-hot column whence fly the sparks, ... And where he stood with his silent court, The wheat shall bow to the wind. This tree represents one of billions that were destroyed by our forefathers as our native fores...
Article
In highly-modified agricultural landscapes, regrowth (secondary) forest on abandoned farmland offers the potential for passive landscape restoration for biodiversity conservation. While numerous studies have investigated the ecological values of regrowth for fauna recovery at the local-level (1–10 ha), there is a dearth of studies quantifying the c...
Article
Full-text available
While the global community is seeking to reduce fossil fuel consumption, a parallel but equally important issue is the environmental impacts of increased world consumption of beef. We provide a comparative analysis and synthesis of the expansion of beef cattle production and its regional and global environmental impacts for Queensland (Australia),...
Article
Landscape change is driven by economic, demographic and cultural factors operating at a range of spatial and temporal scales. However, landscapes developed for agriculture often retain some wooded areas or paddock trees. The study aimed to identify the relationships between, and influence of, the demographic, economic and cultural values of landhol...
Article
The majority of landscapes around the world have been modified or transformed by human activities to meet the needs of human societies. The loss of native vegetation for agricultural development affects the sustainability of growing proportion of the world's ecosystems. Factors such as land tenure, roads and agricultural intensification, together w...
Article
Landscape change occurs through the interaction of a multitude of natural and human driving forces at a range of organisational levels, with humans playing an increasingly dominant role in many regions of the world. Building on the current knowledge of the underlying drivers of landscape change, a conceptual framework of regional landscape change w...
Article
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Present day Australian landscapes are legacies of our colonial history, while future landscapes will be legacies of ecological processes and human impacts occurring today. This paper investigates the legacies of European settlement of Noosa Shire, South-east Queensland, with particular emphasis on the economic and political drivers and the resultan...
Article
Human-induced modifications to the Earth’s surface are important in driving landscape change over wide areas, with agriculture affecting the greatest area. Landscape change is of concern due to the cumulative impact it has on local, regional and global ecosystem functions and components. Research often focuses on tropical forests but, since 1950, v...