Leonard Schuette

Leonard Schuette
Maastricht University | UM · Department of Political Science

About

8
Publications
1,184
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21
Citations
Introduction
I am a doctoral researcher in the ERC NestIOr project at Maastricht University. Most recently, I was a research fellow at the Centre for European Reform (CER), a think tank in London. I received an MPhil in International Relations and Politics from the University of Cambridge in 2018. My research concentrates on EU foreign policy, Brexit, NATO, international relations theories, and German politics.

Publications

Publications (8)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The multilateral order is in crisis. States increasingly contest, undermine, and even withdraw from international organizations (IOs) and multilateral institutions. Challenges emanate not only from emerging powers dissatisfied with the institutional status quo forged for and by Western powers but also from established Western states as well as tran...
Article
This article analyses how and when institutional actors can shape overlap with other international organisations. Growing overlap either poses the threat of marginalisation to the incumbent organisation or offers opportunities for cooperation. Institutional actors should therefore be expected to try shape the relations with the overlapping organisa...
Article
Full-text available
The election of Donald Trump posed an existential challenge to NATO. At the end of his tenure, however, the US president had neither withdrawn membership nor substantially undermined the alliance from within. This article helps explain the puzzle of why NATO survived Trump's presidency. Extant explanations emphasize domestic factors such as the US...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Trump administration posed an unprecedented challenge to many international organizations (IOs). This article analyzes the ability of IOs to respond and explains variation in the survival strategies pursued by the international actors of IOs. It argues that leadership, organizational structure, competences, and external networks affect whether...
Article
Full-text available
This article explains why the European Union has remained strikingly cohesive during the Brexit withdrawal negotiations by focussing on the role played by its negotiator: the European Commission'’s Task Force 50. The analysis demonstrates that the Task Force 50 set out to forge unity among the EU27 by exercising both subtle instrumental and direct...
Article
Embedded within the wider normalization–continuity debate about the nature of Germany’s actorness, this article assesses the impact of collective memory on German foreign policy during the European refugee crisis. The Federal Republic’s open-door policy in autumn 2015 bewildered many observers who saw it as a self-harming act of charity. Based on a...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
NestIOr is a five year research project entitled "Who gets to live forever? Toward an Institutional Theory on the Decline and Death of International Organisations" (2019-2023). It is hosted at Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
Project
This five-year project funded by the European Research Council (ERC) addresses the question why do international organisations (IOs) decline or die? Many IOs are currently under significant pressure resulting in the loss of competences, resources and even member states. The ultimate way for states to show their discontent is to disband IOs: no less than a third of the IOs, created between 1905 and 2005, has formally ceased to exist. While academics have analysed how IOs are designed and develop, we know virtually nothing about decline and death.