Leona Polyanskaya

Leona Polyanskaya
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen | GAUG · General Linguistics

PhD in Linguistics
Starting my ERC project

About

41
Publications
9,699
Reads
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274
Citations
Citations since 2016
28 Research Items
238 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202201020304050
Additional affiliations
December 2018 - December 2020
Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language
Position
  • Fellow
December 2016 - December 2020
Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies showed a bilingual advantage in metacognitive processing (tracking one's own cognitive performance) in linguistic tasks. However, bilinguals do not constitute a homogeneous population, and it was unclear which aspects of bilingualism affect metacognition. In this project, we tested the hypothesis that simultaneous acquisition and u...
Article
Full-text available
Two classes of cognitive mechanisms have been proposed to explain segmentation of continuous sensory input into discrete recurrent constituents: clustering and boundary-finding mechanisms. Clustering mechanisms are based on identifying frequently co-occurring elements and merging them together as parts that form a single constituent. Bracketing (or...
Article
Full-text available
We assessed the effect of bilingualism on metacognitive processing in the artificial language learning task, in 2 experiments varying in the difficulty to segment the language. Following a study phase in which participants were exposed to the artificial language, segmentation performance was assessed by means of a dual forced-choice recognition tes...
Article
Full-text available
Patterns of nonverbal and verbal behavior of interlocutors become more similar as communication progresses. Rhythm entrainment promotes pro-social behavior and signals social bonding and cooperation. Yet it is unknown if the convergence of rhythm in human speech is perceived and is used to make pragmatic inferences regarding the cooperative urge of...
Article
Full-text available
The study explores the effect of deviations from native speech rhythm and rate norms on the assessement of pronunciation mastery of a second language (L2) when the native language of the learner is either rhythmically similar to or different from the target language. Using the concatenative speech synthesis technique, different versions of the same...
Article
Full-text available
In Basque-Spanish bilinguals, statistical learning (SL) in the visual modality was more efficient on nonlinguistic than linguistic input; in the auditory modality, we found the reverse pattern of results. We hypothesize that SL was shaped for processing nonlinguistic environmental stimuli and only later, as the language faculty emerged, recycled fo...
Article
Full-text available
Despite theoretical debate on the extent to which statistical learning is incidental or modulated by explicit instructions and conscious awareness of the content of statistical learning, no study has ever looked into the metacognition of statistical learning. We used an artificial language learning paradigm and a segmentation task that required spl...
Data
These are the sentences elicited from children of three different age groups and adult British English speakers, and annotations done in Praat as TextGrid files. This material was used to prepare the publication: Polyanskaya, L., & Ordin, M. (2015) Acquisition of speech rhythm in first language. Journal of Acoustical Society of America 138(3), 199...
Article
Full-text available
The cognitive mechanisms underlying statistical learning are engaged for the purposes of speech processing and language acquisition. However, these mechanisms are shared by a wide variety of species that do not possess the language faculty. Moreover, statistical learning operates across domains, including nonlinguistic material. Ancient mechanisms...
Article
Full-text available
Statistical learning is a set of cognitive mechanisms allowing for extracting regularities from the environment and segmenting continuous sensory input into discrete units. The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) (N = 25) in conjunction with an artificial language learning paradigm to provide new insight into the neural...
Article
Full-text available
A continuous stream of syllables is segmented into discrete constituents based on the transitional probabilities (TPs) between adjacent syllables by means of statistical learning. However, we still do not know whether people attend to high TPs between frequently co‐occurring syllables and cluster them together as parts of the discrete constituents...
Data
The raw and pre‐processed data and analysis scripts for the publication "Electrophysiology of statistical learning Exploring the online learning process and offline learning product" by Mikhail Ordin, Leona Polyanskaya, David Soto and Nicola Molinaro (https://doi.org/10.1111/ejn.14657). EEG data recorded during the familiarization phase: https://...
Article
Full-text available
Regular rhythm facilitates audiomotor entrainment and synchronization in motor behavior and vocalizations between individuals. As rhythm entrainment between interacting agents is correlated with higher levels of cooperation and prosocial affiliative behavior, humans can potentially map regular speech rhythm onto higher cooperation and friendliness...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose We investigated whether rhythm discrimination is mainly driven by the native language of the listener or by the fundamental design of the human auditory system and universal cognitive mechanisms shared by all people irrespective of rhythmic patterns in their native language. Method In multiple experiments, we asked participants to listen t...
Article
Full-text available
We tested the hypothesis that languages can be classified by their degree of tonal rhythm (Jun, 2014). The tonal rhythms of English and Italian were quantified using the following parameters: (a) regularity of tonal alternations in time, measured as durational variability in peak-to-peak and valley-to-valley intervals; (b) magnitude of F0 excursion...
Article
Full-text available
It is widely accepted that duration can be exploited as phonological phrase final lengthening in the segmentation of a novel language, i.e., in extracting discrete constituents from continuous speech. The use of final lengthening for segmentation and its facilitatory effect has been claimed to be universal. However, lengthening in the world languag...
Book
The study is aimed to estimate the relative contribution of speech rate and speech rhythm into the perceived foreign accent in L2 speech. As L2 acquisition progresses, learners tend to speak more rapidly and with rhythmic patterns that are closer to those exhibited in the target language. These developmental changes in speech rate and rhythm are pe...
Book
The study is aimed to estimate the relative contribution of speech rate and speech rhythm into the perceived foreign accent in L2 speech. As L2 acquisition progresses, learners tend to speak more rapidly and with rhythmic patterns that are closer to those exhibited in the target language. These developmental changes in speech rate and rhythm are pe...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the independent contribution of speech rate and speech rhythm to perceived foreign accent. To address this issue we used a resynthesis technique that allows neutralizing segmental and tonal idiosyncrasies between identical sentences produced by French learners of English at different proficiency levels and maintaining the idiosyncra...
Article
Full-text available
Analysis of English rhythm in speech produced by children and adults revealed that speech rhythm becomes increasingly more stress-timed as language acquisition progresses. Children reach the adult-like target by 11 to 12 years. The employed speech elicitation paradigm ensured that the sentences produced by adults and children at different ages were...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We investigated how English rhythmic patterns develop in the course of first language acquisition by children between four and twelve years. We have empirically confirmed that rhythm becomes increasingly more stress-timed as acquisition progresses, which is revealed by higher durational variability of syllables, vocalic sequences and consonantal cl...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
High degree of between-rater variability in pronunciation assessment is often reported in literature. However, human assessments of pronunciation skills of second language (L2) learners are used in standardized language-proficiency tests. Besides, these scores are used as a reference point in evaluating computer-based systems for pronunciation teac...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
High degree of between-rater variability in pronunciation assessment is often reported in literature. However, human assessments of pronunciation skills of second language (L2) learners are used in standardized language-proficiency tests. Besides, these scores are used as a reference point in evaluating computer-based systems for pronunciation teac...
Article
Full-text available
The development of speech rhythm in second language (L2) acquisition was investigated. Speech rhythm was defined as durational variability that can be captured by the interval-based rhythm metrics. These metrics were used to examine the differences in durational variability between proficiency levels in L2 English spoken by French and German learne...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the perception of developmental changes in timing patterns that happen in the course of second language (L2) acquisition, provided that the native and the target languages of the learner are rhythmically similar (German and English). It was found that speech rhythm in L2 English produced by German learners becomes increasingly stres...
Chapter
The study examines the development of timing control in second language (L2) acquisition in two populations of language learners from rhythmically different first language (L1) backgrounds. Timing control was investigated using interval-based rhythm metrics. We analysed speech produced by French and German learners of English who varied in their pr...
Article
Full-text available
The study compares the development of rhythmic patterns in first language (L1) and second language (L2) acquisition. Using a longitudinal design, we compared rhythmic patterns at different ages in L1 acquisition and at different proficiency levels in L2 acquisition. Speech samples of four children and four adult learners of English were selected fr...
Article
We investigated the independent contribution of speech rate and speech rhythm to perceived foreign accent. To address this issue we used a resynthesis technique that allows neutralizing segmental and tonal idiosyncrasies between identical sentences produced by French learners of English at different proficiency levels and maintaining the idiosyncra...
Article
We investigated the independent contribution of speech rate and speech rhythm to perceived foreign accent. To address this issue we used a resynthesis technique that allows neutralizing segmental and tonal idiosyncrasies between identical sentences produced by French learners of English at different proficiency levels and maintaining the idiosyncra...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The paper presents an analysis of speech rhythm development in second language. 51 German learners of English with varying degrees of proficiency were recorded producing 33 identical sentences of quasi-spontaneous speech. Durational characteristics of syllables, consonantal and vocalic intervals were calculated to allow for analysis of timing patte...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Good evening,
we keep a lot of papers from early research, including consent forms, ethical approvals, detailed protocols, filled in (anonymized) questionnaires, and elicitation materials. Some of these refer to 2012-2014 years, results are published in 2014-2015. Now the universities usually keep these things, but it was not always the case with PhD projects and guest visits. Given that my early research was done on individual fellowship, as a guest or a PhD student, the ethical approvals and consent forms are kept on file by me, not by the university. There are plenty of these consent forms, approvals and files submitted to ethical boards to get the approvals, other currently useless materials.
How long should these papers be kept before I can trash them (it was not specified how long these files will be kept in the ethical approval request forms that I submitted many years ago, I re-read these requests because I also keep them)? Is there specific legal rules for this? Does it differ from country to country? I want to trash these things, given they are heavy, take a lot of space, and we are moving house. Is it ok or should I keep it longer?
Again, this is not data that someone can re-use, Iam talking about records of ethical requests/approvals/consent forms and about individual questionnaires that are not sharable with and useless to others.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
We explore the role of vocal rhythm in speech evolution, acquisition of speech faculty, and in diachronic linguistic changes. Although every human individual possesses the same neural, anatomical, and physiological mechanisms for controlling speech rhythm, rhythmic patterns differ across languages. These language-specific patterns of motor activity are based on general physiological mechanisms, yet shaped by the peculiarities of the ambient language and by cultural transmission between populations sharing a given language. As speech rhythm patterns are simultaneously naturally-occurring and culturally transmitted, studying speech rhythm opens a window onto nature–nurture interactions in language use and acquisition.