Leo Paolini

Leo Paolini
University of Auckland · School of Environment

PhD in Ecology (UNC), LBioSci (UNT)

About

34
Publications
26,783
Reads
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4,459
Citations
Citations since 2016
8 Research Items
2485 Citations
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Introduction
PhD in Ecology with over 15 years of experience in ecological studies. With a strong background in landscape ecology and change detection analysis, I´m currently studying ecological processes of natural and built ecosystems, using time series analysis, real-time monitoring and UAVs.
Additional affiliations
December 2016 - December 2017
University of Auckland
Position
  • Research Associate
October 2015 - present
CONICET-National University of Tucuman
Position
  • Adjunt Researcher
January 2007 - December 2011
National University of Tucuman
Position
  • Professor (Adjunt)
Description
  • Lecture in remote sensing and satellite image analysis
Education
October 2000 - May 2006
National University of Comahue
Field of study
  • Climate change and dsturbances
March 1994 - May 1999
National University of Tucuman
Field of study
  • Forest dynamics in subtropical mountain forests

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization is one of the most extreme forms of land alteration. Energy fluxes are severely affected and cities tend to have the Urban Heat Island (UHI) phenomenon, although vegetated areas inside cities could have a positive effect in mitigating UHI effect. Our main objective was to analyze the relationship between vegetation characteristics, pat...
Article
Full-text available
We analyzed changes in land cover in the Sierra de San Javier and its surroundings, an area of ca. 70 000 ha near San Miguel de Tucumán, an urban center of ca. 1 million people in subtropical Argentina. The analysis covered two periods: 1949-1972 and 1972-2006 using remote sensing techniques. For the year 2001, we mapped the patterns of distributio...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, three methods to retrieve the land surface temperature (LST) from thermal infrared data supplied by band 6 of the Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor onboard the Landsat 5 satellite are compared. The first of them lies on the estimation of the land surface temperature from the radiative transfer equation using in situ radiosounding data. The...
Article
Full-text available
Plants can have positive effects on each other. For example, the accumulation of nutrients, provision of shade, amelioration of disturbance, or protection from herbivores by some species can enhance the performance of neighbouring species. Thus the notion that the distributions and abundances of plant species are independent of other species may be...
Article
Human settlement into rural areas (counterurbanization) is generating new patterns of reforestation, with distinctive features compared to the previously considered pathways of forest transition through “economic development” and “forest scarcity”. Here, we discuss the specific features of this neglected pathway of forest recovery and describe the...
Article
Full-text available
ContextThe patterns and causes of forest transition have been extensively studied, identifying socio-economic drivers of land use deintensification and the associated forest expansion. However, most studies do not take into account the origin of the dominant species of new forests (i.e. native or exotic), which affects biodiversity and the provisio...
Article
Full-text available
Seventy-five percent of the human population will live in urban areas by 2050, and urban vegetation will be the main source of ecosystem services. Unequal access to urban vegetation might exacerbate existing socioeconomic differences. Studies performed in cities of developed countries show that the population with higher socioeconomic status has mo...
Article
Urbanization is causing profound alterations of ecosystem functions at local and regional scales. The need to maximize ecosystem services to improve the livability of cities is resulting in intensive management of urban vegetation, which is likely generating new conditions for the ecosystem functioning. In this paper, we address the association bet...
Article
Full-text available
Phenology is a key ecosystem process that reflects climate–vegetation functioning, and is an indicator of global environmental changes. Recently, it has been suggested that land-use change and timber extraction promote differences in forest phenology. We use remote-sensing data to describe regional leaf phenological patterns in combination with fie...
Article
Changes in ecosystem structure caused by urbanization produce a reduction in photosynthetic productivity, which can lead to reductions in resource availability for birds. Here, we analyzed the relation between photosynthetic productivity and bird assemblages in a subtropical urban ecosystem, in North-Western Argentina. We used Generalized Linear Mo...
Data
During the last 15 years we have been monitoring the fire occurrence in Tucumán, NW Argentina, using FIRMS data (MODIS) and estimate CO2 emissions based on the number of fires, intensity and area covered. As a results we generated an interactive dashboard in order to improve visualization and data extraction. Interactive dashboard: https://public.t...
Poster
Full-text available
Estudiamos la relación espacio-temporal entre la composición de aves y la fenología y estructura de los bosques del Chaco Seco.
Article
Full-text available
Argentinean Yungas (subtropical montane forests) have high biodiversity and play a key role in regional watershed regulation. Ligustrum lucidum(glossy privet), native of China, is one of the dominant exotic tree species in secondary forests of this ecoregion. Due to its high growth rates and green foliage throughout the year -in contrast to native...
Article
Full-text available
Subtropical forests in montane ecosystems grow under a wide range of environmental conditions. However, little is known about the growth responses of subtropical trees to climate along ecological gradients. To assess how, and to what extent climate controls tree growth, we analyzed tree responses to climate for 15 chronologies from 4 different spec...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental trends and ecosystems' ranges of variability are little known in tropical very high elevation Andean ecosystems (above 4400 m a.s.l.). We combined satellite image analyses and dendrochronological methods with instrumental records at lower elevation to assess changes in lake size and indices of plant productivity of subtropical high-el...
Chapter
Full-text available
vege-tación en áreas urbanizadas y la impermeabili-zación del suelo causada por las edifi caciones, contribuye a un aumento de la temperatura de superfi cie generando un fenómeno cono-cido como Isla de Calor Urbana (ICU). La ICU describe la diferencia entre las temperaturas en zonas urbanas y rurales, señalando que la temperatura del aire en un áre...
Article
Full-text available
Resumen El crecimiento urbano modifica drásticamente los patrones espaciales de cobertura natural. El re-emplazo de estas coberturas por superficies impermeables alteran los flujos de energía, generando la formación de «Islas de calor» en las áreas con mayor densidad de edificaciones. En la actualidad la dinámica del crecimiento urbano está asociad...
Article
Full-text available
Urban growth drastically changes the spatial patterns of natural cover. Replacement of natural land cover by impervious surfaces alters the energy flows, promoting «heat islands» formation in the areas with the highest density of buildings. At present, urban growth dynamic is associated with sprawl into outlying areas. This produces significant and...
Chapter
Full-text available
Climate and natural disturbances are strongly related. Several studies have shown the strong relationships between precipitation, soil-water content, and landslide occurrence (e.g. Keefer and Johnson 1983; Schwab 1983; Iverson and Major 1987; Bovis and Jones 1992; Schwab 2002).
Chapter
Full-text available
Presentamos un mapa de unidades de vegetación incluyendo la sierra de San Javier y sierras vecinas (Periquillo, Loma Montuosa, Yerba Huasi) en base a imágenes Landsat de 2006. El área analizada tiene más de 40,000 has en un rango altitudinal de 500 a 1900 m, y un rango de precipitaciones entre 600 y 1500 mm anuales. Tras un uso intenso en el pasado...
Article
Full-text available
Landsliding is a complex process that modifies mountainscapes worldwide. Its severe and sometimes long-lasting negative effects contrast with the less-documented positive effects on ecosystems, raising numerous questions about the dual role of landsliding the feedbacks between biotic and geomorphic processes, and, ultimately, the ecological and evo...
Article
Full-text available
Radiometric corrections serve to remove the effects that alter the spectral characteristics of land features, except for actual changes in ground target, becoming mandatory in multi‐sensor, multi‐date studies. In this paper, we evaluate the effects of two types of radiometric correction methods (absolute and relative) for the determination of land...
Article
Landslides are common on the steep slopes of the subtropical montane forests in Northwestern (NW) Argentina (Yungas). Instrumental and tree-ring records from this region indicate that rainfall has increased during the second half of the 20th century and there has also been an increase in landslide events. We used dendroecological techniques to date...
Article
It is generally assumed that tree growth in the upper limit of a forest is mainly controlled by summer temperature. This general statement is mostly based on studies from extra-tropical mountains and has been rarely evaluated in subtropical latitudes frequently characterized by drier climates. In the subtropical mountains from Northwestern Argentin...
Article
The use of dendroecological techniques to describe temporal patterns of disturbances and forest dynamics has been largely restricted to high-latitude ecosystems. In this review, we present the results of recent developments in subtropical northwestern Argentina (22–28°S). The area is characterized by a subtropical monsoonal climate (wet summers, dr...
Article
Full-text available
Water retention on the leaf surface can be maladaptive to the plant because it increases the colonization of epiphylls and interferes with the physiologic processes of the leaf, diminishing the photosynthetic capacity. To test if leaf driptips facilitate leaf drying after rainfall in a tropical rain forest of Costa Rica, we (1) experimentally measu...
Article
Full-text available
Water retention on the leaf surface can be maladaptive to the plant because it increases the coloniza- tion of epiphylls and interferes with the physiologic processes of the leaf, diminishing the photosynthetic capac- ity. To test if leaf driptips facilitate leaf drying after rainfall in a tropical rain forest of Costa Rica, we (1) exper- imentally...
Article
Full-text available
Water retention on the leaf surface can be maladaptive to the plant because it increases the colonization of epiphylls and interferes with the physiologic processes of the leaf, diminishing the photosynthetic capacity. To test if leaf driptips facilitate leaf drying after rainfall in a tropical rain forest of Costa Rica, we (1) experimentally measu...
Article
Full-text available
Due to the scarcity of species with annual tree rings, the use of dendrochronological techniques has received little attention in tropical and subtropical montane dry areas. In this study, we assess the dendrochronological potential of Prosopis ferox, "churqui", through the analysis of its wood anatomy and the relationships between climate and tree...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
Urbanisation is a global phenomenon that defines the 21st century. Although urban areas cover less than 2% of the planet they accommodate more than 50% of the world's population and are responsible for more than 75% of energy consumption and up to 80% of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Policy makers propose to increase vegetation cover in cities to mitigate local CO2 emissions and to restore ecosystem services (e.g. air pollution and climate regulation). Ecosystem services provided by urban vegetation are closely related to vegetation characteristics and ecosystem functions (e.g. species specific photosynthetic activity). Thus, information on vegetation cover alone is not sufficient to quantify urban ecosystem services. To date the temporal and spatial variation in urban vegetation functions and services are poorly studied. Further, not much is known about of the role of vegetation in releasing CO2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and under environmental stress. Our goal is to develop an innovative multi-scale (temporal and spatial) and multi-sensor approach to quantify the spatial and temporal dynamics of functions and ecosystems services provided by Auckland’s urban vegetation. To investigate the temporal dynamics of local climate change and vegetation functioning we will use time series analysis of vegetation indices and surface temperature images derived from satellite images (MODIS) which will be processed using the TIMESAT software. This allows to reconstruct the temporal and spatial patterns of plant phenology and surface temperature. The large scale approach (phenology and temperature patterns reconstruction derived from MODIS) will be complemented with high spatial resolution multispectral images using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and ground level measurements of CO2 and VOCs. Once the correlations are established the resulting parameters will be combined with other field surveys (i.e leaf area index, biomass, etc.) and incorporated into the i-tree software to quantify the ecosystem services provided by urban forests and its variations over time. The outcome of this innovative multi-dimensional approach provides a new framework/prototype to investigate the dynamic of ecosystems functions and to value ecosystems services in urban areas. This prototype can be modified for other urban areas around the globe and thus would enable policy makers and local governments to assess the benefit of urban vegetation in combating climate change and to enhance the wellbeing of urban citizens.