Leo McCann

Leo McCann
The University of York · York Management School

About

71
Publications
9,382
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1,177
Citations
Citations since 2016
25 Research Items
749 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140

Publications

Publications (71)
Article
How is medical labor power, that being the capacity to assemble, adjust, or arrange medical subjects, converted into medical practice? Drawing on three qualitative case studies in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom, we argue that this conversion is shaped by pressures channeled through the relations that medical workers enter into wi...
Article
Foucault's medical gaze has only been minimally applied to palliative care through the analysis of key policy documents. This paper develops the conceptualisation of Foucault's medical gaze using empirical data gathered from a group ethnography of a hospice daycare centre. Using Foucault's medical gaze as a theoretical aporia we conceptualise the “...
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The concept of ‘place’ can play a powerful role in understanding how leadership is socially constructed. This article explores the geographic, symbolic and mythic uses of place in the cultivation of a distinct leadership style around the Presidency of John F. Kennedy. It focuses on the history of a social and learning event that today might be call...
Article
Leadership education can be reductionist and facile. Recent scholarship in management and organizational history has reexamined many of the most established business school concepts and literatures, rethinking the ‘lessons’ taught from - among others - Taylor, Maslow and the Human Relations School. This paper similarly uses historical methods (oral...
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HRM literature often fails to adequately consider the political‐economic context that can strongly influence HR practices and outcomes. This problem is particularly visible as regards international careers. Notions such as “boundaryless careers” privilege HR and employee agency and neglect the complexity, variety, and importance of social structure...
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Traditional understandings of care-giving assume care practices are clear to others and unambiguously altruistic, reflective of the selfless and humane bearing of care professionals. However, a range of organisational research has noted the complex and often contradictory ways in which enactments of care are interwoven into organisational relations...
Article
University governance is becoming increasingly autocratic as marketization intensifies. Far from the classical ideal of a professional collegium run according to academic norms, today’s universities feature corporate cultures and senior leadership teams disconnected from both staff and students, and intolerant of dissenting views. This is not a com...
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Framed by Tronto’s (1993) description of care as social process, and her third and fourth phases of ‘care-giving’ and ‘care-receiving’ as part of this process, this chapter deals with the issue of how care might be performed competently as a practical accomplishment in social interaction. From a discourse analysis of interview texts about ‘being ge...
Article
The sociology of professions has so far had limited connections to emergency services occupations. Research on emergency occupations tends to focus on workplace culture and identity, often emphasizing continuity rather than change. Police officers, firefighters and paramedics have their historical roots in manual, technical or ‘semi-professional’ o...
Book
Critical Perspectives in Emergency Services Management makes an important contribution to the subject of emergency services management and to public administration and organization studies more generally. It critically assesses developments in emergency services management by examining the multi-dimensional nature of the provision of emergency serv...
Article
Working life in public sector professions is undergoing significant change and becoming increasingly demanding. This paper explores work intensity in NHS ambulance services in England, describing four distinct but interrelated dimensions of intensity: temporal, physical, emotional, and organizational. We use the concept of edgework to explore the c...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe a hybrid approach to the research developed during a multi-researcher, ethnographic study of NHS management in the UK. Design/methodology/approach This methodological paper elaborates a hybrid approach to the sociological analysis – the critical-action theory – and indicates how it can contribute to...
Article
Managerialism versus professionalism is a central axis of conflict across many occupations. ‘The profession of arms’ is no exception. This article explores the contested yet symbiotic relationship of management and the military via a discussion of the Vietnam conflict and contemporary debates over restructuring the US military to fight so-called ‘N...
Article
This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of the following article: Hulya Dagdeviren, Peter Lund-Thomsen and Leo McCann, 'Multiple paths through the complexities of globalization: The next three years of Competition & Change'. The final, definitive version of this paper has been published in Competition & Change, Vol 2 (1): 3-9, advanced acc...
Book
This book explores the daily realities of working life for middle managers in the UK’s National Health Service during a time of radical change and disruption to the entire edifice of publicly-funded healthcare. It is an empirical critique of the movement towards a healthcare model based around HMO-type providers such as Kaiser Permanente and United...
Article
Career narratives could make a potentially valuable contribution to an ‘historic turn’ in management and organization studies. This paper provides an historical narrative on the career of Robert S. McNamara, former President of Ford, US Secretary of Defense, and Chairman of the World Bank. Based on a thorough exposition and deconstruction of histor...
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The label ‘extreme’ has traditionally been used to describe out-of-the-ordinary and quasi-deviant leisure subcultures which aim at an escape from commercialized and over-rationalized modernity or for occupations involving high risk, exposure to ‘dirty work’ and a threat to life (such as military, healthcare or policing). In recent years, however, t...
Article
The paramedic profession, along with the broader structure and mission of NHS emergency ambulance provision, is undergoing significant but rather undefined change. The clinical scope of the paramedic role has broadened, and the opening of new patient pathways has enabled a broader range of treatment and referral options for attending ambulance crew...
Article
PLEASE NOTE THAT THE ACCEPTED AUTHOR MANUSCRIPT IS AVAILABLE VIA http://www.mbs.ac.uk/research/people/profiles/edward.granter Lean thinking has recently re-emerged as a fashionable management philosophy, especially in public services. A prescriptive or mainstream literature suggests that lean is rapidly diffusing into public sector environments, p...
Article
Based on a three-year ethnographic study of four UK National Health Service (NHS) organizations, we explore the everyday cultural experience of managing clinical and administrative workforces. Although NHS organizations claim to function as enlightened HRM employers, we argue that the inflexible application of metrics-based target systems to clinic...
Article
Much has been written about the relocation of services jobs away from OECD nations by offshoring. But what happens to those who remain employed at workplaces where offshoring has been carried out? Based on survey and interview data of UK insurance and banking staff, this article explores employees' subjective understandings of the impacts of offsho...
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Female empowerment is a prerequisite for a just and sustainable developed society. Being the most developed non-western country, Japan offers an instructive window onto concerns about gender worldwide. Although overall gender equality is advancing in Japan, difficulties remain, especially in achieving equality in the workplace. We draw on theories...
Article
Purpose – This paper aims to explore the culture of working life in British financial services multinationals in the period leading up to the financial crisis of 2007-2008. Design/methodology/approach – Informed by labour process theory, the paper is based on a questionnaire survey and in-depth interviews with technicians and junior managers in Br...
Article
This paper explores the professionalization project of paramedics, based on an ethnographic study of UK National Health Service (NHS) ambulance personnel. Drawing on concepts derived from institutional theory and the sociology of professions, we argue that the project is enacted at two levels, namely a formal, structural and senior level reflecting...
Technical Report
The NHS has undergone significant changes in recent years. Reforms have taken place against a backcloth of major restructuring of large organizations, public and private, across OECD nations, with organizations typically attempting to adapt in the face of major performance and cost pressures. We relate developments in the management of health care...
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Japanese firms are renowned for being change-averse, even after financial crises. On the basis of a case study of Shinsei Bank, a highly symbolic example of radical attempted change, this paper explores the difficulties of reconciling two very different socio-economic models – Japanese and American. An interview-based study of current and former Sh...
Article
This symposium of Public Administration explores the impact of the ‘Great Financial Crisis’ (GFC) on public services provision and delivery. This introductory article discusses the political and media ‘framing’ and ‘counter-framing’ of what the GFC means for reforming public service bargains. The dominant frame is that service reform and cutbacks t...
Article
Purpose ‐ This paper aims to explore the culture of working life in British financial services multinationals in the period leading up to the financial crisis of 2007-2008. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Informed by labour process theory, the paper is based on a questionnaire survey and in-depth interviews with technicians and junior managers in Bri...
Article
abstractThe end of the traditional management career has been heralded with supporting, albeit largely anecdotal, data. The ‘old’ career was set within internal labour markets in large organizations and characterized by long‐term stability. The ‘new’ arrangements have apparently shifted responsibility from employer to employee, with careers being d...
Chapter
This chapter suggests potential consequences for the NHS of widespread denigration of middle management. It is based on ethnographic research in the UK NHS. In 1994 Tony Watson published In search of management, continuing an academic preoccupation with elaborating the lived experience of being a manager. This chapter derives from the opening phase...
Article
This article provides a cross-national, qualitative investigation into the experiences of middle managers in large organizations in the USA, the UK and Japan, following organizational restructuring. Despite well-documented national differences in administrative heritage, institutional regimes or 'varieties of capitalism', our data point towards con...
Chapter
Workplaces are often fraught with conflict and disagreement. Contrary to the views of many mainstream authors writing for the core disciplines of business and management (such as organizational behaviour, human resource management, and information systems), conflict cannot easily be nullified, minimized or eradicated by the adoption of managerial ‘...
Article
In recent years, widespread organisational change in large corporations has almost invariably led to work intensification and increased stress for managers. Managing in the Modern Corporation explains how and why large companies have changed their organisational structures and philosophies, focusing in particular on how these changes affect the car...
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In this paper we analyse representations of the Japanese salaryman and Japanese organization in Japanese manga, or graphic novels, during the turbulent decades from the mid-1980s to the present day. We argue that manga presents salarymen protagonists in a sympathetic yet not uncritical light, and that it displays support for and criticism of both t...
Article
This article identifies two, nation-wide, forms of governance or organizing capital,`shareholder' capitalism and `managerial' capitalism, epitomized by the USA and Japan respectively. Furthermore, it identifies the implications for managers in these systems. The article argues that both varieties of capitalism have been forced to modify, due to pre...
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Based on qualitative interviews (n = 64) within five UK organizations that have embarked on large-scale restructuring (including delayering, downsizing, culture change, role redesign, lean production) we argue that middle managers are currently experiencing significant and progressive work and personal pressures. Performance is monitored mor...
Article
An important contribution to our understanding of management transformation in post-socialist societies has been made by new institutionalism. The strength of this approach derives from its critique of normative models based on neo-classical economics, which has tended towards institutional and management voluntarism. It has been able to grasp comp...
Article
The discipline of international management has favoured predominantly functional and structural approaches to data collection and analysis, and its concepts are usually based on rather unitarist, ethnocentric interpretations of `global business' that sideline local features and exaggerate the impact of change. On the other hand, the `varieties of c...
Article
The ‘transition’ from state socialism in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, and the substantial economic reforms in China, are two of the most significant economic and social processes in recent history. However, despite a growing literature dealing with management in post-socialist societies, there have been few attempts to establish a pa...
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The prolonged, 10-year, economic downturn in Japan has had far-reaching implications for structure and human resource management (HRM) practices in Japanese organizations. In particular, the demise of hierarchical and group structures has been predicted, together with the end of distinctive FIRM features such as lifetime employment and seniority-ba...
Article
Based on extensive original research in the Republic of Tatarstan, in the Central Volga region of Russia, this book examines the economic development path followed by Tatarstan since the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Russian financial crash of 1998. It argues that the roles of global capitalism and globalisation are somewhat exaggerated in m...
Article
The transition of Russia to a 'developed market economy' has been slower, more contradictory and less predictable than expected. This book examines contemporary Russian socio-economic development, and explores the degree to which Russian experiences can be incorporated into current social science theories. In particular, it questions how far the co...
Article
Middle managers are facing major workplace pressures in an era of widespread corporate and public sector restructuring in Japan, USA and UK. This paper, based on interviews with senior/HR managers and middle managers in 30 large organizations, suggests that middle managers today face heavy workloads and limited promotion prospects. More significant...
Article
Russia's regions are attempting to form meaningful democratic systems, free markets and profitable industrial firms. This article, based on qualitative interviewing with local and foreign economic actors in the Republic of Tatarstan in central Russia, argues that while there are strong desires for globalisation to happen, the goal of significant in...
Article
Urbanization not only comprises population growth. It is a certain form of social life. Urban life revolves around a city with a developed economy, infrastructure, communications, and social security and should be distinct from other kinds of localities. Cities should function as centres of economic growth, policy-making and cultural life. Understa...
Article
Presents a unique view of informality within the government of Tatarstan which challenges the notion that these forms can be dismissed as simply corruption. Focuses on interviews with investors and businessmen, showing how informality can be an important factor in the reproduction of elite classes. Limits the article to the unique dynamics of the t...
Article
Debates about the extent and nature of the contemporay transformation of capitalism lie at the heart of much of the literature emanating from the disciplines of sociology, political economy, and management. All kinds of methodological and ontological tools have been taken up by analysts grappling with contemporary economic issues such as the growin...

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