Lena Schend

Lena Schend
Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf | HHU · Institut für Informatik

Dr. rer. nat.

About

17
Publications
884
Reads
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265
Citations
Citations since 2017
3 Research Items
129 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
Additional affiliations
February 2011 - January 2016
Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Hedonic games are coalition formation games in which players have preferences over the coalitions they can join. For a long time, all models of representing hedonic games were based upon selfish players only. Among the known ways of representing hedonic games compactly, we focus on friend-oriented hedonic games and propose a novel model for them th...
Article
We propose a new representation setting for hedonic games, where each agent partitions the set of other agents into friends, enemies, and neutral agents, with friends and enemies being ranked. Under the assumption that preferences are monotonic (respectively, antimonotonic) with respect to the addition of friends (respectively, enemies), we propose...
Article
In a FEN-hedonic game, each player partitions the set of other players into friends, enemies, and neutral players and ranks her friends and enemies. Assuming that preferences are monotonic with respect to adding friends and antimonotonic with respect to adding enemies, we use bipolar responsive extensions to lift the players’ rankings of players to...
Article
We study the computational complexity of the existence and the verification problem for wonderfully stable partitions (WSPE and WSPV) and of the existence problem for strictly core stable coalition structures (SCSCS) in enemy-oriented hedonic games. In this note, we show that WSPV is NP-complete and both WSPE and SCSCS are DP-hard, where DP is the...
Article
Control in elections models situations in which an external actor tries to change the outcome of an election by restructuring the election itself. The corresponding decision problems have been shown NP-hard for a variety of voting systems. In particular, in our companion paper [16], we have shown that fallback and Bucklin voting are resistant (in t...
Article
Electoral control models ways of changing the outcome of an election via such actions as adding, deleting, or partitioning either candidates or voters. To protect elections from such control attempts, computational complexity has been used to establish so-called resistance results. We show that fallback voting, an election system proposed by Brams...
Article
A central theme in computational social choice is to study the extent to which voting systems computationally resist manipulative attacks seeking to influence the outcome of elections, such as manipulation (i.e., strategic voting), control, and bribery. Bucklin and fallback voting are among the voting systems with the broadest resistance (i.e., NP-...
Conference Paper
Walsh [23,22], Davies et al. [9], and Narodytska et al. [20] studied various voting systems empirically and showed that they can often be manipulated effectively, despite their manipulation problems being NP-hard. Such an experimental approach is sorely missing for NP-hard control problems, where control refers to attempts to tamper with the outcom...
Article
Full-text available
Walsh [Wal10, Wal09], Davies et al. [DKNW10, DKNW11], and Narodytska et al. [NWX11] studied various voting systems empirically and showed that they can often be manipulated effectively, despite their manipulation problems being NP-hard. Such an experimental approach is sorely missing for NP-hard control problems, where control refers to attempts to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In the context of voting, manipulation and control refer to attempts to influence the outcome of elections by either setting some of the votes strategically (i.e., by reporting untruthful preferences) or by altering the structure of elections via adding, deleting, or partitioning either candidates or voters. Since by the celebrated Gibbard–Satterth...
Conference Paper
The original possible winner problem is: Given an unweighted election with partial preferences and a distinguished candidate c, can the preferences be extended to total ones such that c wins? We introduce a novel variant of this problem in which not some of the voters' preferences are uncertain but some of their weights. Not much has been known pre...
Article
Full-text available
Electoral control models ways of changing the outcome of an election via such actions as adding/deleting/partitioning either candidates or voters. To protect elections from such control attempts, computational complexity has been investigated and the corresponding NP-hardness results are termed "resistance." It has been a long-running project of re...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Electoral control models ways of changing the outcome of an election via such actions as adding/deleting/partitioning either candidates or voters. These actions modify an election's participation structure and aim at either making a favorite candidate win ("constructive control") or prevent a despised candidate from winning ("destructive control")....
Article
Full-text available
Electoral control models ways of changing the outcome of an election via such actions as adding/deleting/partitioning either candidates or voters. These actions modify an election's participation structure and aim at either making a favorite candidate win ("constructive control") or prevent a despised candidate from winning ("destructive control"),...
Article
Full-text available
We study the control complexity of fallback voting. Like manipulation and bribery, electoral control describes ways of changing the outcome of an election; unlike manipulation or bribery attempts, control actions---such as adding/deleting/partitioning either candidates or voters---modify the participative structure of an election. Via such actions...

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