Lee Drutman

Lee Drutman
New America · Political Reform

About

35
Publications
1,243
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96
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Campaign donors and corporate interests have greater access to Congress, and the legislative agenda and policy outcomes reflect their preferences. How this privileged access converts into influence remains unclear because petitioner-legislator interactions are unobserved. In this article, we report the results of an original survey experiment of 43...
Article
As American democracy remains in crisis, reform proposals proliferate. I make two contributions to the debate over how to respond to the current crisis. First, I organize reform proposals into three main categories: moderation, realignment, and transformation. I then argue why transformation is necessary, given the deep structural problems of Ameri...
Chapter
This chapter explains how electoral reform can happen in America. Nobody doubts American politics is broken. Poll after poll confirms a deeply discontented electorate. However, there is less agreement around a solution. Americans seem to agree they want more parties. However, few Americans understand the institutional reasons why more parties do no...
Chapter
This chapter looks at the new era of toxic politics, when a fully-nationalized, fully-sorted two-party system emerged, divided over increasingly existential questions over the fate of American national identity. American national politics is so dysfunctional because it has two disciplined, non-overlapping parties, each constantly seeking to win a n...
Chapter
This chapter examines the paradox of partisanship. In 1950, the American Political Science Association put out a major report arguing for a “more responsible two-party system.” The two parties—the Democratic Party and the Republican Party—were then largely indistinguishable coalitions of parochial local parties, and the political scientists argued...
Chapter
This concluding chapter presents a vision of a future multiparty America and makes a final plea for reform. If Americans do not change their electoral system, they are in big trouble. Democracies die when the country splits apart into two sides who distrust and fear each other so much that one side blows up norms of fair play to keep the other part...
Chapter
This chapter explores the specifics of a new voting system: ranked-choice voting, with multi-member districts for the US House. As the name suggests, ranked-choice voting lets voters rank their choices. The votes are then tallied as follows: If one candidate has an outright majority of first-place votes, that candidate wins. However, if no candidat...
Article
Full-text available
Cambridge Core - American Studies - Can America Govern Itself? - edited by Frances E. Lee
Article
Full-text available
The American lobbying information processing system is woefully outdated. The mechanisms by which citizen, interest group, and business concerns are incorporated into the policymaking process have largely not been updated in over 200 years. Lobbyists set up meetings with staffers and members of Congress and share position papers with them about the...
Article
On the Value of Fox-like Thinking, and How to Break into the Washington Policy Community - Volume 49 Issue 3 - Lee Drutman
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research on influence has produced seemingly contradictory findings. On the one hand, some scholars have shown that on any given issue, economic resources show little relationship to the likelihood of policy success (Baumgartner et al. 2009). Yet, other scholars have found that policy outcomes match the preferences of the top interest groups...
Article
We ask whether the 2007 Honest Leadership and Open Government Act lobbying regulations had the desired impact. We also develop and test a theory of why congressional staffers leave to become lobbyists. Our basic findings are as follows: The likelihood of moving from Congressional staff to lobbyist is highest for the more experienced and better-paid...
Article
For decades, scholars have debated the role of corporations in American politics. To date, they have relied on either interviews or publicly disclosed spending and lobbying reports. This paper presents new methods and data that enable us to consider the internal processes of corporate political attention instead. Aided by automated content analysis...
Article
This paper argues that the growth of corporate lobbying is the result of a path-dependent learning process. Companies may come to Washington to respond to threats, but the act of establishing an office sets in motion several reinforcing processes that make companies value lobbying more and more over time. Lobbyists teach managers about the importan...

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