Lee Clare

Lee Clare
Deutsches Archäologisches Institut · Istanbul Department

PhD

About

42
Publications
46,420
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,300
Citations
Introduction
My current research focus lies in the Early (Aceramic) Neolithic in Upper Mesopotamia and adjacent regions.
Additional affiliations
July 2013 - present
Deutsches Archäologisches Institut
Position
  • PostDoc Position
June 2009 - June 2013
University of Cologne

Publications

Publications (42)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper aims to analyze the crucial factors that determine the choice of location at Göbekli Tepe. It is examined whether belief-powered or mundane reasons influenced this decision or rather if the decision was autotelic motivated or made for strategic reasons, to achieve an external effect. This leads to the question of how the landscape was pe...
Article
Full-text available
Short note on an aurochs bone with an embedded flint projectile Point from Göbekli Tepe, in Turkish.
Article
An aurochs right humerus with a fragment of an embedded projectile point was discovered during excavations at early Neolithic Göbekli Tepe in south-eastern Turkey. Evidence for hunting trauma in bones is extremely rare in the prehistoric record from the Near East and Africa, while the dataset from Europe is much larger. In this contribution a hunti...
Article
Archaeological excavations at Göbekli Tepe, a transitional Neolithic site in southeast Turkey, have revealed the earliest megalithic ritual architecture with characteristic T-shaped pillars. Although human burials are still absent from the site, a number of fragmented human bones have been recovered from fill deposits of buildings and from adjacent...
Article
Full-text available
In a paper recently published in this journal, Martin B. Sweatman and Dimitrios Tsikritsis from the University of Edinburgh (School of Engineering) have suggested an interpretation for the early Neolithic monumental enclosures at Göbekli Tepe as space observatories and the site's complex iconography the commemoration of a catastrophic astronomical...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the possible links between rapid climate change (RCC) and social change in the Near East and surrounding regions (Anatolia, central Syria, southern Israel, Mesopotamia, Cyprus and eastern and central Sahara) during the ‘long’ 4th millennium (~4500e3000) BC. Twenty terrestrial and 20 marine climate proxies are used to identify lo...
Article
Full-text available
Recent advances in palaeoclimatological research combined with new radiocarbon data from West and Northwest Anatolia, the Aegean, and Southeast Europe have led us to the formulation of a new hypothesis for the temporal and spatial dispersal of Neolithic lifestyles from their core areas of genesis. This hypothesis, which we term the ‘Rapid Climate C...
Article
Full-text available
Investigations of a balk in the centre of the prehistoric settlement of D∫uljunica-SmərdeΠ comprised a sequence of archaeological deposits from the very onset of Neolithisation in Southeastern Europe throughout the end of the Early Neolithic. The arrival of Neolithic lifeways in the region coincides with the end of a period for which palaeoclimate...
Data
News on recent research and events in the Göbekli Tepe project.
Chapter
Full-text available
In the past few years advances in palaeoclimatology have provided a range of new perspectives for climate-archaeological research both in the Pleistocene and Holocene. In recent contributions (Weninger et al. 2006, 2009, 2011; Clare et al. 2008; Clare 2013) we have repeatedly indicated the existence of some interesting coincidences between the timi...
Article
Full-text available
In extension of the recently established ‘Rapid Climate Change (RCC) Neolithisation Model’ (e.g. Clare 2013), in the present paper we demonstrate the existence of a remarkable coincidence between the exact (decadel-scale) entry and departure dates of the Neolithic into/from the Aegean (~6600/6050 calBC) with begin/end of RCC-conditions.
Article
Full-text available
'Ain Ghazal is among the earliest large population centers known in the Middle East. A total of four major stratigraphic cultural units have been identified: 1) The oldest Middle Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (MPPNB) unit (10.2 to 9.5 cal ka BP) clearly corresponds with the early Holocene maximum Dead Sea levels. 2) The second unit consists of Late Pre-P...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This lecture provides an introduction to the Palaeoclimatology and Archaeology of Rapid Climate Change (RCC sensu Paul Mayewski and Eelco Rohling) and also covers the 4.2 ka calBP event (sensu Harvey Weiss) with a presentation on old and new data.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper focuses on the influence of conflict and violence on Neolithisation and Neolithic dispersal in the Eastern Mediterranean. While the transition from hunter-gathering to Neolithic economies in the early Holocene is generally regarded as solely practicable at times of peace and harmonious relations between communities, we ask whether the su...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies of the impact of Rapid Climate Change (RCC) on prehistoric communities have often been restricted in their explanatory power due to the lack of an appropriate analytical tool capable of combining palaeoclimate data with archaeological culture. In this paper, we seek to remedy this shortfall by introducing theoretical-methodological...
Data
Full-text available
In this paper we explore the meaning of the word probability, not in general terms, but restricted to the field of radiocarbon dating, where it has the meaning of ‘dating probability assigned to calibrated 14C-ages’. The intention of our study is to improve our understanding of certain properties of radiocarbon dates, which – although mathematicall...
Data
Full-text available
ABSTRACT – In this paper we explore the meaning of the word probability, not in general terms, but restricted to the field of radiocarbon dating, where it has the meaning of ‘dating probability assigned to calibrated 14C-ages’. The intention of our study is to improve our understanding of certain properties of radiocarbon dates, which – although ma...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we explore the impact of Rapid Climate Change (RCC) on prehistoric communities in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Early and Middle Holocene. Our focus is on the social implications of the four major climate cold anomalies that have recently been identified as key time-windows for global RCC (Mayewski et al. 2004). These cooling a...
Article
Full-text available
Around 8200 calBP, large parts of the now submerged North Sea continental shelf ('Dog-gerland') were catastrophically flooded by the Storegga Slide tsunami, one of the largest tsunamis known for the Holocene, which was generated on the Norwegian coastal margin by a submarine landslide. In the present paper, we derive a precise calendric date for th...
Article
Full-text available
This paper proposes an association between climate forcing connected with the 8200 calBP 'climate event' and a postulated phase of internecine warfare and population collapse at Late Neolithic/Early Chalcolithic sites in Pisidia, southwestern Turkey. A summary of this evidence is pro- vided and a hypothetical scenario considered in the context of c...
Book
Full-text available
Auf der Balkanhalbinsel hat der Fluss Strymon immer die Rolle eines wichtigen Verbindungsgliedes zwischen der Ägäis und Mitteleuropa gespielt. Über seinen Bereich und den Fluss Iskar war in der Urgeschichte die Donau erreichbar und über diese auch Mitteleuropa. Im 7.–6. Jahrtausend v. Chr. war das der wichtigste Weg über welchen, mit Zwischenstatio...
Article
Full-text available
We explore the hypothesis that the abrupt drainage of Laurentide lakes and associated rapid switch of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation 8200 yr ago had a catastrophic influence on Neolithic civilisation in large parts of southeastern Europe, Anatolia, Cyprus, and the Near East. The event at 8200 cal yr BP is observed in a large number of...
Article
Full-text available
In den letzten Jahren hat sich unsere Kenntnis der Klimaentwicklung in den eiszeitlichen Perioden wie auch im Holozän durch das Aufschließen neuer und hochauflösender Klimaarchive beträchtlich erweitert. In zahl� reichen nationalen und internationalen Schwerpunktprogrammen richtet sich das Augenmerk der Paläokli� maforscher auf die Erforschung und...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The site of Göbekli Tepe is located in southeastern Anatolia, c. 10 km northeast of the modern city of Şanlıurfa. The monumental complex is constructed from monolithic T-shaped pillars dating to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic (PPNA and PPNB), between c. 9.500 and 8.200 cal. BCE. Göbekli Tepe is interpreted as a ritual center and communication platform for a regionally interconnected hunter-gatherer society. The environs of Göbekli Tepe are studied in order to understand the Late Quaternary landscape development; with a temporal focus on the transition from the Late Pleistocene to the Early Holocene. This is achieved by a combination of local geomorphological investigations and sediment analyses. Alluvial and colluvial sediments, obtained from outcrops in small-scale catchments in the vicinity of Göbekli Tepe, are analyzed regarding their geochemical and -physical characteristics and the depositional phases are estimated applying radiocarbon dating. Alongside, geomorphological mapping is carried out to provide detailed descriptions of the geomorphological context for the profile locations. The results will provide first insights into the varying Late Quaternary morphodynamics in the environs of Göbekli Tepe and will allow - in combination with local palaeobiological data and regional climate and vegetation data - to draw a first picture of the development of the natural environment. The integration of results from local geomorphological and sediment analyses and the archaeological data from Göbekli Tepe will lead to an enhanced understanding of the Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene landscape in Upper Mesopotamia at the transition from hunter-gatherer societies to an agricultural lifestyle.
Project
Publications of the Göbekli Tepe research project.