Leanna Rosinski

Leanna Rosinski
Northern Illinois University · Department of Psychology

Bachelor of Arts

About

4
Publications
459
Reads
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12
Citations
Citations since 2017
4 Research Items
12 Citations
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Introduction
Current research interests: Temperament Emotion regulation Intergenerational transmission of emotions, behaviors, physiological stress response characteristics Methods and techniques: Longitudinal research Physiological measures (RSA, Cortisol) Behavioral coding Experimental methods

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
Early in development, children rely heavily on caregivers for assistance with the regulation of negative emotion. As such, it is important to understand parent characteristics that influence caregiver ability to attenuate infant negative affect and mediating factors by which this process may unfold. This study examined the relationship between pare...
Article
Infants' abilities to orient and regulate are directly linked to self‐regulatory capacity in childhood, which is subsequently associated with indicators of health and well‐being. However, relatively little is known regarding factors affecting early orienting and regulation. The current study evaluated the effects of infant negative affect and house...
Article
Existing evidence indicates that maternal responses to infant distress, specifically more sensitive and less inconsistent/rejecting responses, are associated with lower infant negative affect (NA). However, due to ethical and methodological constraints, most existing studies do not employ methods that guarantee each mother will be observed respondi...
Article
Temperament by parenting interactions may reflect that individuals with greater risk are more likely to experience negative outcomes in adverse contexts (diathesis-stress) or that these individuals are more susceptible to contextual influences in a “for better or for worse” pattern (differential susceptibility). Although such interactions have been...

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