Leah Williams Veazey

Leah Williams Veazey
The University of Sydney · Department of Sociology and Social Policy

Doctor of Philosophy

About

22
Publications
3,262
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24
Citations
Introduction
Leah Williams Veazey currently works as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Sydney Centre for Healthy Societies in the School of Social and Political Sciences. She was awarded her PhD in Sociology in 2019 for her research with migrant mothers in Australia, focusing on their use of migrant maternal online communities. Her research interests include​ migration, motherhood, digital cultures, health, social inequalities and social justice.
Additional affiliations
January 2022 - February 2022
The University of Sydney
Position
  • Postdoctoral Research Associate
April 2020 - December 2021
The University of Sydney
Position
  • Research Officer

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
From the adoption of mask-wearing in public settings to the omnipresence of hand-sanitising, the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has brought unprecedented cultural attention to infection prevention and control (IPC) in everyday life. At the same time, the pandemic threat has enlivened and unsettled hospital IPC processes, fracturing confidence, demanding new f...
Article
Full-text available
Surviving cancer in the precision era of targeted drugs and immunotherapies increasingly involves surviving-with malignancy. Against this backdrop of precision, innovation and chronicity, this paper offers a person-centred examination of some of the emerging intersections of chronic living and cancer treatment. Using a temporally extended qualitati...
Chapter
Mothers have been sidelined in individualistic accounts of middling migration focusing on youth, mobility, education, and skills. Migrant mothers disturb the narrow socio-economic categorisations that have been central to the concept of middling migration. A matricentric, gender-sensitive and relational approach that centres migrant mothers and und...
Article
Background. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has critically challenged healthcare systems globally. Examining the experiences of healthcare workers (HCWs) is important for optimising ongoing and future pandemic responses. Objectives. In-depth exploration of Australian HCWs’ experiences of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, with a focus on reported stressors vis-à-vis...
Article
Full-text available
Background The SARS–CoV-2 pandemic has challenged health systems globally. A key controversy has been how to protect healthcare workers (HCWs) using personal protective equipment (PPE). Methods Interviews were performed with 63 HCWs across two states in Australia to explore their experiences of PPE during the SARS–CoV-2 pandemic. Thematic analysis...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to highlight both global interconnectedness and schisms across place, context and peoples. While countries such as Australia have securitised their borders in response to the global spread of disease, flows of information and collective affect continue to permeate these boundaries. Drawing on interviews with Australi...
Research
For many women, during the pandemic and associated lockdowns, closed Facebook groups have been a place to do just that. These groups offer a chance to escape the house virtually and spend time with like-minded souls, sometimes chatting, often venting, and seeking solidarity in virtual sisterhood. Mental health issues, chronic illness, domestic vio...
Article
Debates about the state of Australian sociology have raged for as long as sociology has existed in Australia. Concerns about the discipline’s future may be inevitable for a critical, reflexive discipline, but to those entering the discipline, it is neither instructive nor productive to be subjected to lingering disciplinary anxieties. After more th...
Article
Facebook groups are spaces where women form communities and share their lived experiences. These peer-created and peer-moderated groups have ‘closed’ security settings, indicating that interactions within the group are to be considered private. They attract membership from women who desire safe, ‘trusted’, gender-specific spaces, though as this art...
Article
What does migrancy mean for personhood, and how does this flow through caring relations? Drawing on life history interviews and photo elicitation with 43 people who identify as migrants and live with cancer, here we argue for the significance of recognising complex personhood as it inflects illness and care. Drawing on social science theory around...
Chapter
Chapter 2 introduces the migrant maternal Facebook groups, which are this study’s research sites. The groups are described and placed in the broader context and history of parents’ groups in Australia. Their origin stories are explained, in relation to the personal mothering and migration stories of the women who created them, and in the context of...
Chapter
This book set out to examine the experiences of contemporary migrant mothers in Australia, through the lens of migrant maternal online communities. Through analysis of data generated by scoping, survey, and semi-structured interview methods, those online communities have been shown to function on instrumental, relational, affective, and metonymic l...
Chapter
Chapter 4 focuses on the practices of the migrant mothers who run the groups, shaping them into gendered and geographically-based sites of belonging and trust. I introduce the term ‘meta-maternal practices’ to describe how the group administrators establish a behavioural norm of compassion between mothers and build migrant maternal solidarities. Vi...
Chapter
This chapter introduces the concepts of imagined maternal communities, personal maternal narratives and migrant maternal imaginaries. It highlights how migrant mothers imagine themselves within local, national and diasporic maternal communities, and within an individual maternal narrative that may have been disrupted by migration. Migrant mothers,...
Chapter
Chapter 3 explores the emotional, relational and social dimensions of migrant motherhood. Drawing out the mothers’ experiences of isolation, friendship, homesickness, guilt, failure, and disconnection, the chapter explores how these emotions are seen as barriers to feeling ‘at home’ in Australia. Participating in migrant maternal online communities...
Article
Since the advent of digital and mobile communication technologies, scholars have been investigating how these technologies are changing experiences of migration and mobility. In the field of gender and migration, researchers have shown how the experience of migration can change maternal practices, and alter understandings of ‘good motherhood’. Thes...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter foregrounds the intersections of migration and motherhood in the lives of women mothering away from ‘home’ after migrating to Australia. Migration and motherhood instigate a dual disruption of women’s social infrastructure at the precise time their need for support, advice, information, empathy and companionship increases. In response,...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores the importance of relationships between migrant mothers in Australia through the lens of Facebook groups created by and for migrant mothers, referred to here as glocalised maternal communities. The combination of migration and motherhood creates a dual rupture in mothers’ social networks, leading to isolation and emotional cha...
Chapter
Full-text available
Expectations of the transition to parenthood often bear little resemblance to parents’ lived experiences, yet shape parents’ emotional responses. Drawing on concepts of intensive mothering, emotion work, and maternal ambivalence, this chapter explores the turbulent emotions of the transition to parenthood through an analysis of interviews with new...
Chapter
Migrant mothers face multiple ruptures in their networks and identity during the migration process and transition to motherhood (Barclay & Kent, 1998; Benza & Liamputtong, 2014; Crouch & Manderson, 1993; DeSouza, 2006; Oakley, 1981; Rogan, Shmied, Barclay, Everitt, & Wyllie, 1997). This chapter explores the social media strategies used by migrant m...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Since its origins in Black feminism and Critical Race Theory (Crenshaw 1989), intersectionality has become a “travelling theory” (Said 1981) and has found a home, albeit a contested one, in sociology. Grounded in intersectionality’s social justice roots as a political and academic project, this paper discusses intersectionality in motherhood studie...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
To understand the attitudes, beliefs and concerns of healthcare workers in Australia about infection prevention and control during the COVID-19 pandemic. To formulate a unique interprofessional understanding of the dynamics of preventing and controlling infections, which gives voice to the full spectrum of stakeholders, including nurses, doctors, paramedics, allied health professionals, as well as hospital support staff and managers. To provide important real-time evidence for those seeking to manage the pandemic, and for policy development, communication strategies and future preparedness and training.
Project
This study aims to reveal how Australians, over several generations, have sought to make sense of society in an organised way. Drawing from interviews with key scholars and practitioners, and supplemented by archival and citation data; this study proposes to first ascertain how sociological knowledge has been shaped by a context of post-colonialism, multiculturalism and global capitalism; and secondly, to reveal the extent to which these ideas have contributed to, and been influenced by, policy, legislation and public debate. The intention is thus to provide new evidence about the role of disciplines, and contribute to better policymaking and the international research effort in this emerging field.