Leah Dickens

Leah Dickens
Kenyon College · Department of Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

14
Publications
9,478
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
839
Citations
Introduction
Leah Dickens currently works at the Department of Psychology, Kenyon College. Leah does research in Emotion, Social Psychology, and Positive Psychology topics.
Additional affiliations
July 2017 - present
Kenyon College
Position
  • Professor
July 2016 - June 2017
Bowdoin College
Position
  • Professor
July 2015 - present
Mount Holyoke College
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Social Psychology; Social Cognition; Laboratory in Social Psychology; Social Psychology Seminar: Emotions
Education
May 2012 - August 2015
Northeastern University
Field of study
  • Psychology
August 2010 - May 2012
Northeastern University
Field of study
  • Psychology
August 2005 - May 2009
Connecticut College
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Pride is a complex construct, at times conceptualized positively (as a positive emotional reaction to a personal success) and at other times defined negatively (as exhibiting arrogant or conceited feelings and beliefs). Based on this dichotomy, Tracy and Robins (2007) proposed that pride consists of two facets: authentic pride (AP) and hubristic pr...
Chapter
Full-text available
The search for and presence of meaning in life is an inherent human need which transcends cultural boundaries. The cultivation of meaning, which focuses on the discovery of what matters most in life and the pursuit of personal aspirations, has shown to have significant effects on lowering psychopathology, and enhancing individual well-being in vari...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Given that more than half the world’s population report feelings of meaninglessness and that access to psychological services are limited or expensive, psychologists need to develop innovative and scalable means to provide psychological services to those in need. Social media platforms provides an innovative channel through which to admi...
Chapter
Gratitude is all the rage at present. Both researchers and popular media have latched on to gratitude as an easy way to make significant life improvements, ranging from increasing well-being to strengthening relationships. Can the simple practice of gratitude really produce noteworthy effects? Many authors cite one particular paper in support (c.f....
Article
Gratitude interventions have been proposed as beneficial practices for improving myriad positive outcomes, and are promoted in self-help literature. The current work examined gratitude interventions’ effects with meta-analytic techniques to synthesize findings of thirty-eight studies, totaling 282 effect sizes. Fifty-six separate meta-analyses exam...
Article
Social robots are innovative new technologies that have considerable potential to support children’s education as tutors and learning companions. Given this potential, it behooves us to study the mechanisms by which children learn from social robots, as well as the similarities and differences between children’s learning from robots as compared to...
Article
Full-text available
Interpersonal coordination, the extent to which social partners coordinate each other’s postures and mannerisms, acts as a “social glue” that serves both individual and social goals, such as producing prosocial behaviors and facilitating harmonious interactions. Research in this area has become prominent in a variety of domains both within and outs...
Article
Past research has regularly linked the experience of affect to increased impatience and, thereby, decreased self-control. Given emerging work identifying the emotion gratitude as a fairly unique affective state capable of enhancing, rather than inhibiting, patience, the present study examined the association between chronically elevated gratitude a...
Article
Children ranging from 3 to 5 years were introduced to two anthropomorphic robots that provided them with information about unfamiliar animals. Children treated the robots as interlocutors. They supplied information to the robots and retained what the robots told them. Children also treated the robots as informants from whom they could seek informat...
Article
Full-text available
The human mind tends to excessively discount the value of delayed rewards relative to immediate ones, and it is thought that "hot" affective processes drive desires for short-term gratification. Supporting this view, recent findings demonstrate that sadness exacerbates financial impatience even when the sadness is unrelated to the economic decision...
Data
Full-text available
The human mind tends to excessively discount the value of delayed rewards relative to immediate ones, and it is thought that “hot” affective processes drive desires for short-term gratification. Supporting this view, recent findings demonstrate that sadness exacerbates financial impatience even when the sadness is unrelated to the economic decision...
Article
Positive affect has been associated with increased nonconscious mimicry-an association that is quite logical given ties between positive mood and desires for social bonding. Yet positive emotions vary with respect to function, leading to the prediction that not all positive states might similarly increase mimicry. Pride, due to its association with...
Article
Because trusting strangers can entail high risk, an ability to infer a potential partner's trustworthiness would be highly advantageous. To date, however, little evidence indicates that humans are able to accurately assess the cooperative intentions of novel partners by using nonverbal signals. In two studies involving human-human and human-robot i...
Article
Full-text available
Economic exchange often pits options for selfish and cooperative benefit against one another. Decisions favoring communal profit at the expense of self-interest have traditionally been thought to stem from strategic control aimed at tamping down emotional responses centered on immediate resource acquisition. In the present article, evidence is prov...

Network

Cited By