Léa Briard

Léa Briard
University of Georgia | UGA · Odum School of Ecology

Ph.D

About

8
Publications
789
Reads
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68
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - present
Institut de Parasitologie et de Pathologie Tropical de Strasbourg
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Anthelmintic properties of plants eaten by semi-free ranging horses
January 2014 - May 2014
University of Strasbourg
Position
  • temporary teacher position
Description
  • Pratical work of Ethology for a class of postgraduate student (Master 2 Ecophysiology and Ethology) Tutorial of Ethology for undergraduate student (3rd year Licence)
October 2011 - September 2015
Université Libre de Bruxelles (Unit of Social Ecology)
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Decision-making processes during collective movements in domestic horses (Equus. f. caballus)
Education
October 2011 - September 2015
University of Strasbourg
Field of study
  • Animal Behaviour
September 2009 - June 2011
University of Strasbourg
Field of study
  • Ecophysiology and Ethology
September 2008 - June 2009
University of Warwick
Field of study
  • 3rd year as an Erasmus student

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Herbal medicine has impacted veterinary medicine including equine practice. Many of the postulated health-promoting effects of medicinal plants are discussed in the context of their antioxidative properties, but different factors such as digestion can have an effect on the activities of compounds. The effect of simulated foregut digestion condition...
Article
Full-text available
Establishing how collective decisions emerge is central to our understanding of animal societies. A frequent approach in collective behaviour studies is to look for leaders that will trigger and direct group movements. Relatively few studies on collective movements, notably in mammals, have taken the events preceding group departures into account....
Article
The role of leader in polygynous species has been solely attributed to the male for some time, but recent studies shown decision making to be distributed within the group. However, the specific reproductive strategy and behavioural repertoire of males in polygynous species such as horses may mean that these individuals still have the potential to p...
Thesis
La vie en groupe représente de nombreux défis pour les animaux et l’un d’entre eux est le maintien de la cohésion groupe. Comment les animaux décident collectivement vers où et quand se déplacer,se nourrir, se reposer alors qu’ils n’ont pas les mêmes motivations ou besoins ? Dans ce travail de thèse je me suis intéressée aux mécanismes qui sous-ten...
Article
Understanding how groups of individuals with different motives come to daily decisions about the exploitation of their environment is a key question in animal behaviour. While interindividual differences are often seen only as a threat to group cohesion, growing evidence shows that they may to some extent facilitate effective collective action. Rec...
Article
Full-text available
Animals adapt their movement patterns to their environment in order to maximize their efficiency when searching for food. The Lévy walk and the Brownian walk are two types of random movement found in different species. Studies have shown that these random movements can switch from a Brownian to a Lévy walk according to the size distribution of food...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
- Identify the causal relationship between parasitism and some personality traits in cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus). - Experimental removal of endoparasites (ivermectin and pyrantel) - Repeated tests (novel-environment, handling bag), trappability and trap diversity used as measures of personality differences - Parasite load estimated from fecal samples - Innate immune parameters measured from blood samples
Project
This study is the second part of a project on food choices and parasitism in horses. During the first part, we observed 20 semi-free ranging horses naturally parasited by gastrointestinal helminths, recorded their food choices (plant species, ingested amount) and collected plant samples. Today, I am collaborating with parasitologists and chemists to identify potential bioactive plants that were spontaneously eaten during these behavioural observations. To do so, we use in vitro tests of plant extracts on cyathostome L3 larvae.