Laynara F. Lugli

Laynara F. Lugli
Technische Universität München | TUM · School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan

PhD

About

21
Publications
4,163
Reads
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156
Citations
Citations since 2017
19 Research Items
146 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230204060
Additional affiliations
January 2022 - January 2022
Technische Universität München
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • My role is to study the effects of climate change (e.g. elevated CO2, drought) in soil-plant interactions in the Amazon forest.
June 2019 - present
Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • I study the interactions between soils and plants in the AmazonFACE project, where CO2 is experimentally elevated in a tropical forest.
May 2013 - March 2015
Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia
Position
  • Researcher
Education
June 2015 - March 2019
University of Exeter
Field of study
  • Physical Geography - Ecology of the Amazon Forest
March 2011 - March 2013
February 2006 - December 2010
Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT)
Field of study
  • Forest Ecology

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims Ancient Amazon soils are characterised by low concentrations of soil phosphorus (P). Therefore, it is hypothesised that plants may invest a substantial proportion of their resources belowground to adjust their P-uptake strategies, including root morphological, physiological (phosphatase enzyme activities) and biotic (arbuscular...
Article
Full-text available
The productivity of rainforests growing on highly weathered tropical soils is expected to be limited by phosphorus availability¹. Yet, controlled fertilization experiments have been unable to demonstrate a dominant role for phosphorus in controlling tropical forest net primary productivity. Recent syntheses have demonstrated that responses to nitro...
Article
Full-text available
Most land surface models (LSMs), i.e. the land components of Earth system models (ESMs), include representation of nitrogen (N) limitation on ecosystem productivity. However, only a few of these models have incorporated phosphorus (P) cycling. In tropical ecosystems, this is likely to be important as N tends to be abundant, whereas the availability...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In large parts of the Amazon rainforest low soil phosphorus availability may prevent the stimulation of forest growth in response to elevated atmospheric CO 2 (eCO 2). One strategy of plants could be to increase the relative allocation of the extra C belowground to their root systems to enhance nutrient acquisition and alleviate the potential phosp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Soils of tropical forests generally have low fertility, therefore nutrient cycling has great importance in these ecosystem functions, once these soil elements are essential for vegetative tissue and plant metabolic processes. Understanding and quantifying the processes that involve nutrient acquisition, storage, and output in plants, and their rela...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Seasonal phenological patterns in the Amazon Forest result from interactions among climate and turnover rates of different plant tissues. Changes in productivity rates and allocation are predicted to occur with climate change, particularly for dynamic tissues such as fine-roots and leaves. Accurate measurements of fine-roots and litterfall dynamics...
Article
Full-text available
In the tropical rainforest of Amazonia, phosphorus (P) is one of the main nutrients controlling forest dynamics, but its effects on the future of the forest biomass carbon (C) storage under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations remain uncertain. Soils in vast areas of Amazonia are P-impoverished, and little is known about the variation or plastic...
Article
Full-text available
Terrestrial biosphere models typically use the biochemical model of Farquhar, von Caemmerer, and Berry (1980) to simulate photosynthesis, which requires accurate values of photosynthetic capacity of different biomes. However, data on tropical forests are sparse and highly variable due to the high species diversity, and it is still highly uncertain...
Article
Most Land Surface Models (LSMs), the land components of Earth system models (ESMs), include representation of N limitation on ecosystem productivity. However only few of these models have incorporated phosphorus (P) cycling. In tropical ecosystems, this is likely to be particularly important as N tends to be abundant but the availability of rock-de...
Article
Full-text available
Vegetation processes are fundamentally limited by nutrient and water availability, the uptake of which is mediated by plant roots in terrestrial ecosystems. While tropical forests play a central role in global water, carbon, and nutrient cycling, we know very little about tradeoffs and synergies in root traits that respond to resource scarcity. Fro...
Article
Full-text available
Vegetation processes are fundamentally limited by nutrient and water availability, the uptake of which is mediated by plant roots in terrestrial ecosystems. While tropical forests play a central role in global water, carbon, and nutrient cycling, we know very little about tradeoffs and synergies in root traits that respond to resource scarcity. Fro...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Large parts of the Amazon rainforest grow on weathered soils depleted in phosphorus and rock-derived cations. We tested the hypothesis that in this ecosystem, fine roots stimulate decomposition and nutrient release from leaf litter biochemically by releasing enzymes, and by exuding labile carbon stimulating microbial decomposers. Methods W...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose The tropical phosphorus cycle and its relation to soil phosphorus (P) availability are a major uncertainty in projections of forest productivity. In highly weathered soils with low P concentrations, plant and microbial communities depend on abiotic and biotic processes to acquire P. We explored the seasonality and relative importance of dri...
Preprint
Full-text available
Terrestrial biosphere models typically use the biochemical model of Farquhar, von Caemmerer and Berry (1980) to simulate photosynthesis, which requires accurate values of photosynthetic capacity of different biomes. However, data on tropical forests are sparse and highly variable due to the high species diversity, and it is still highly uncertain h...
Article
Full-text available
In tropical forests, free-living Biological nitrogen (N) fixation (BNF) in soil and litter tends to decrease when substrate N concentrations increase, whereas increasing phosphorus (P) and molybdenum (Mo) soil and litter concentrations have been shown to stimulate free-living BNF rates. Yet, very few studies explored the effects of adding N, P, and...
Preprint
Full-text available
Purpose. The tropical phosphorus-cycle and its impacts on phosphorus (P) availability are a major uncertainty in projections of forest productivity. In highly weathered soils with low P concentrations, plant and microbial communities depend on biological and physical processes to acquire P. We explored the seasonality and relative importance of dri...
Article
Soil nutrient availability can strongly affect root traits. In tropical forests, phosphorus (P) is often considered the main limiting nutrient for plants. However, support for the P paradigm is limited, and N and cations might also control tropical forests functioning. We used a large‐scale experiment to determine how the factorial addition of nitr...
Article
Full-text available
Background:Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an essential component in tropical forest ecosystems and its quantity varies widely with forest types. Aims:Relationships among CWD, soil, forest structure and other environmental factors were analysed to understand the drivers of variation in CWD in forests on different soil types across central Amazonia. Me...
Chapter
Full-text available
Este capítulo apresenta uma série de resultados de pesquisas voltadas para uma melhor compreensão dos fatores ambientais que influenciam a produtividade das plantas em áreas com mosaicos formados pelas três formações vegetais que dominam a Região Sul do Amazonas: os campos baixos (ou “limpos”), campos altos (ou “sujos”) e as florestas. Nas floresta...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Hello everyone, the use of ink+vinegar solution to stain roots to analyse for mycorrhizal colonsiation is a safer and cheaper option that is being recently more used. I'd like to know if any of you already worked with this method, instead of using CBE or Trypan Blue as stains? Is the contrast good enough to see AM colonisation? In what kind of magnification would it be good to work? I'll work with roots from Amazonian trees and I don't plant to use these samples for morphological work, only for %AM colonisation. If you could then share your experiences I'd happy to hear about it. Thanks!

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The Amazon Fertilisation Experiment (AFEX), funded by NERC, is the first large-scale nutrient manipulation experiment in mature tropical forest of the Brazilian Amazon. The goal of the project is to assess how nutrients regulate key aspects of the carbon (C) cycle, including above and belowground productivity. For project updates see: https://amazonfertilisationexperiment.wordpress.com/