Lawrence N Hudson

Lawrence N Hudson
Natural History Museum, London · Department of Life Sciences

PhD Computational Ecology

About

72
Publications
46,856
Reads
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5,745
Citations
Citations since 2016
35 Research Items
5417 Citations
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000
Additional affiliations
March 2016 - April 2017
Natural History Museum, London
Position
  • Developer - open data and innovation
November 2014 - August 2015
Natural History Museum, London
Position
  • Digitisation systems engineer
November 2013 - present
Natural History Museum, London
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • PREDICTS project - www.predicts.org.uk - Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems.

Publications

Publications (72)
Article
Full-text available
Background Land-use is a major driver of changes in biodiversity worldwide, but studies have overwhelmingly focused on above-ground taxa: the effects on soil biodiversity are less well known, despite the importance of soil organisms in ecosystem functioning. We modelled data from a global biodiversity database to compare how the abundance of soil-d...
Article
Full-text available
Human use of the land (for agriculture and settlements) has a substantial negative effect on biodiversity globally. However, not all species are adversely affected by land use, and indeed, some benefit from the creation of novel habitat. Geographically rare species may be more negatively affected by land use than widespread species, but data limita...
Data
Sensitivity of the estimated effect of land use on the abundance of widely and narrowly distributed species to variation in quality of underlying range-size estimates. Because sample size was much reduced in the most stringent subsets of the data, land use in these models was classified more coarsely than in the main models, into primary vegetation...
Data
Effects of proximity to roads, human population density, and length of landscape use by humans on RCAR. Separate effects are shown for each land use because interaction terms were significant (all P < 0.05). For clarity, shading shows ±0.5 × standard error rather than the 95% confidence interval. Distance to the nearest road is shown here as the ra...
Data
Locations of sites for subsets of the data of increasing stringency in terms of the quality of underlying range-size estimates. Data quality reflected variation in the quality of species’ range-size estimates and was measured as the estimated inventory completeness of GBIF records for each of 4 taxonomic groups (trachaeophytes, amphibians, mammals,...
Data
Effects of land use on RCAR, estimated based on GBIF-based measures of range size gridded at different resolutions. Effects of land use and land-use intensity using RCAR based on range occupancy using GBIF records, gridded at a spatial resolution of 110 km × 110 km (A), 55 km × 55 km (B), and 11 km × 11 km (C). Based on range extent using GBIF reco...
Data
Spatial autocorrelation in the model residuals. A Moran’s I test was applied to the residuals from the final models, dividing the residuals into the individual underlying surveys. The distribution of P values across the tests for each of the surveys is shown here, for measures of RCAR and RAR based on different underlying estimates of range size—ra...
Data
List of all references for underlying community data. These references are a subset of those in the PREDICTS database [21]. (DOCX)
Data
Spatial patterns in the residuals of the final model of RCAR as a function of human pressures. A map of each site included in the final model, where point colours represent the value of the model residuals for each site (blue = low; red = high), showing no discernible spatial pattern (A). The outline map is based on the World Bank map of river basi...
Data
Statistics explaining geographical variation in the strength of the response of RCAR to human land use. Linear models were used to explain the strength of the response of RCAR as a function of variables hypothesized to drive observed tropical-temperate differences. Variables considered were geographic zone (tropical versus temperate) itself, and 3...
Data
Definitions of the major land-use classes. Each site was classified into one of these classes based on the description of the habitat where the biodiversity sample was taken, as given in the underlying papers from which the biodiversity data were obtained (see S1 Text). (DOCX)
Data
Locations of surveys, and taxonomic and geographic representativeness of the data. The location of each survey whose data were included in the analysis (A), shown in the Lambert cylindrical equal area projection. Point diameters are proportional to the (loge) number of sites sampled by each survey and are translucent so areas of opaque color indica...
Data
Correspondence between estimates of RCAR based on different estimates of species’ range size. Estimates of range occupancy derived from records in the GBIF database were gridded at spatial resolutions of 110 km × 110 km, 55 km × 55 km, and 11 km × 11 km (A–C). A measure of range extent (a conceptually different measure of range size compared with t...
Data
Comparison of the effects of human land use on RCAR and on species richness, for individual underlying studies. Separate models were fitted for species richness and RCAR as a function of land use. For these models, land use was classified coarsely as either natural (primary or secondary vegetation) or human (plantation forests, croplands, pastures,...
Data
Sensitivity of the estimated effect of land use on RCAR to variation in quality of underlying range-size estimates. Because sample size was much reduced in the most stringent subsets of the data, land use in these models was classified more coarsely than in the main models into primary vegetation, secondary vegetation, and human land uses (combinin...
Data
Statistics explaining geographical variation in the strength of the response of RAR to human land use. Linear models were used to explain the strength of the response of RAR as a function of variables hypothesized to drive observed tropical-temperate differences. Variables considered were geographic zone (tropical versus temperate) itself, and 3 mo...
Data
Criteria used to classify land use and land-use intensity. The classification was made based on the description of the habitat given in the underlying papers from which the data were obtained (see S1 Text). (DOCX)
Chapter
Full-text available
The PREDICTS project (Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems) has collated ecological survey data from hundreds of published biodiversity comparisons of sites facing different land-use and related pressures, and used the resulting taxonomically and geographically broad database (abundance and occurrence data fo...
Article
Full-text available
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Data
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Article
Full-text available
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Article
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Article
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Article
Full-text available
AIM: Understanding the impact of land use change within assemblages is fundamental to mitigation policies at local and regional scale. Here, we aim to quantify how site-level terrestrial assemblages are responding to land use change in Colombia a mega-diverse country and to project future biodiversity under different scenarios of land use change as...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the impact of land use change within assemblages is fundamental to mitigation policies at local and regional scale. Here, we aim to quantify how site-level terrestrial assemblages are responding to land use change in Colombia a mega-diverse country and to project future biodiversity under different scenarios of land use change associa...
Article
Full-text available
Protected areas are widely considered essential for biodiversity conservation. However, few global studies have demonstrated that protection benefits a broad range of species. Here, using a new global biodiversity database with unprecedented geographic and taxonomic coverage, we compare four biodiversity measures at sites sampled in multiple land u...
Data
Supplementary Figures 1-4, Supplementary Tables 1-3, Supplementary Note 1, Supplementary Methods and Supplementary References.
Article
Crossing “safe” limits for biodiversity loss The planetary boundaries framework attempts to set limits for biodiversity loss within which ecological function is relatively unaffected. Newbold et al. present a quantitative global analysis of the extent to which the proposed planetary boundary has been crossed (see the Perspective by Oliver). Using o...
Technical Report
A dataset of 3,250,404 measurements, collated from 26,114 sampling locations in 94 countries and representing 47,044 species. The data were collated from 480 existing spatial comparisons of local-scale biodiversity exposed to different intensities and types of anthropogenic pressures, from terrestrial sites around the world. The database was assemb...
Technical Report
A dataset of 3,250,404 measurements, collated from 26,114 sampling locations in 94 countries and representing 47,044 species. The data were collated from 480 existing spatial comparisons of local-scale biodiversity exposed to different intensities and types of anthropogenic pressures, from terrestrial sites around the world. The database was assemb...
Data
Figure S1. Global distribution of primary habitat predicted to occur at 30 arc sec resolution produced by downscaling the coarse grained (0.5°) Land‐use Harmonisation dataset. Colours are ramped light (low) to dark (high). Figure S2. Global distribution of secondary habitat predicted to occur at 30 arc sec resolution produced by downscaling the co...
Article
Full-text available
Land-use change is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity globally. The effects of land use on biodiversity manifest primarily at local scales which are not captured by the coarse spatial grain of current global land-use mapping. Assessments of land-use impacts on biodiversity across large spatial extents require data at a similar spatial grain...
Article
Full-text available
Land use has large effects on the diversity of ecological assemblages. Differences among land uses in the diversity of local assemblages (alpha diversity) have been quantified at a global scale. Effects on the turnover of species composition between locations (beta diversity) are less clear, with previous studies focusing on particular regions or g...
Data
Appendix S1: Diversity data set (including details and references for data used in this study). Table S1: Search terms. Table S1.2: Data sources and sample sizes, with references. Table S1.3: Land‐use class and intensity definitions. Figure S1.1: Map of sites used in analysis. Appendix S2: Species traits data set. Appendix S2.1: List of speci...
Article
Full-text available
The world’s natural history collections constitute an enormous evidence base for scientific research on the natural world. To facilitate these studies and improve access to collections, many organisations are embarking on major programmes of digitization. This requires automated approaches to mass-digitization that support rapid imaging of specimen...
Article
Full-text available
Bees are a functionally important and economically valuable group, but are threatened by land‐use conversion and intensification. Such pressures are not expected to affect all species identically; rather, they are likely to be mediated by the species' ecological traits. Understanding which types of species are most vulnerable under which land uses...
Article
Full-text available
Food webs are important tools for understanding how complex natural communities are structured and how they respond to environmental change. However their full potential has yet to be realised because of the huge amount of resources required to construct them de novo. Consequently, the current catalogue of networks that are suitable for rigorous an...
Article
Full-text available
Human activities, especially conversion and degradation of habitats, are causing global biodiversity declines. How local ecological assemblages are responding is less clear[mdash]a concern given their importance for many ecosystem functions and services. We analysed a terrestrial assemblage database of unprecedented geographic and taxonomic coverag...
Data
Appendix S2. R function to create a vector of weighted means the same order as a vector.
Data
Full-text available
Figure S2. Response of species richness to NDVI at the 6.25×6.25 km scale using spatially-weighted and unweighted data.
Data
Full-text available
Figure S1. Response of species richness to vegetation indices at the focal pixel scale.
Data
Figure S3. Response of species richness to EVI at the 6.25×6.25 km scale using spatially-weighted and unweighted data.
Data
Appendix S1. R script for downloading MODIS vegetation indices for analysis.
Data
Appendix S3. R script for analysing EVI and NDVI data for a single pixel.
Data
Appendix S4. R script for analysing EVI and NDVI data for a 6×6 km area of interest.
Data
Table S1. Dummy ecological data set for conducting analysis.
Article
Full-text available
Remotely sensed data - available at medium to high resolution across global spatial and temporal scales - are a valuable resource for ecologists. In particular, products from NASA's MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), providing twice-daily global coverage, have been widely used for ecological applications. We present MODISTools,...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity continues to decline in the face of increasing anthropogenic pressures such as habitat destruction, exploitation, pollution and introduction of alien species. Existing global databases of species’ threat status or population time series are dominated by charismatic species. The collation of datasets with broad taxonomic and biogeograph...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity continues to decline in the face of increasing anthropogenic pressures such as habitat destruction, exploitation, pollution and introduction of alien species. Existing global databases of species' threat status or population time series are dominated by charismatic species. The collation of datasets with broad taxonomic and biogeograph...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat loss and degradation, driven largely by agricultural expansion and intensification, present the greatest immediate threat to biodiversity. Tropical forests harbour among the highest levels of terrestrial species diversity and are likely to experience rapid land-use change in the coming decades. Synthetic analyses of observed responses of sp...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity continues to decline in the face of increasing anthropogenic pressures such as habitat destruction, exploitation, pollution and introduction of alien species. Existing global databases of species’ threat status or population time series are dominated by charismatic species. The collation of datasets with broad taxonomic and biogeograph...
Chapter
Extreme climatic events are expected to increase in frequency and intensity under climate change. Climate models predict shifts in rainfall patterns that will exacerbate drought, with potentially devastating effects on freshwater ecosystems. Experimental approaches are now advocated to explore the impact of extreme events on natural systems: here,...
Article
Full-text available
A major goal of ecology is to discover how dynamics and structure of multi-trophic ecological communities are related. This is difficult, because whole-community data are limited and typically comprise only a snapshot of a community instead of a time series of dynamics, and mathematical models of complex system dynamics have a large number of unmea...
Article
Full-text available
The power-law dependence of metabolic rate on body mass has major implications at every level of ecological organization. However, the overwhelming majority of studies examining this relationship have used basal or resting metabolic rates, and/or have used data consisting of species-averaged masses and metabolic rates. Field metabolic rates are mor...
Data
Full-text available
Appendix S1. Assembling the database. Appendix S2. Main models. Appendix S3. Within-group-centred models. Appendix S4. Opportunities for future improvements in the data. Fig. S1. Residuals against fitted values for the global model fitted by restricted maximum likelihood. Fig. S2. Actual values against fitted values for the global model fitted by r...
Data
Database of individual FMR and body mass measurements.
Article
Full-text available
1. There has been a lack of software available to ecologists for the management, visualisation and analysis of ecological community and food web data. Researchers have been forced to implement their own data formats and software, often from scratch, resulting in duplicated effort and bespoke solutions that are difficult to apply to future analyses...
Article
Extreme climatic events are expected to increase in frequency and intensity under climate change. Climate models predict shifts in rainfall patterns that will exacerbate drought, with potentially devastating effects on freshwater ecosystems. Experimental approaches are now advocated to explore the impact of extreme events on natural systems: here,...
Article
Extreme climatic events are expected to increase in frequency and intensity under climate change. Climate models predict shifts in rainfall patterns that will exacerbate drought, with potentially devastating effects on freshwater ecosystems. Experimental approaches are now advocated to explore the impact of extreme events on natural systems: here,...
Chapter
Environmental warming is predicted to rise dramatically over the next century, yet few studies have investigated its effects in natural, multi-species systems. We present data collated over an 8-year period from a catchment of geothermally heated streams in Iceland, which acts as a natural experiment on the effects of warming across different organ...
Article
Full-text available
Experimental data from intergenerational field manipulations of entire food webs are scarce, yet such approaches are essential for gauging impacts of environmental change in natural systems. We imposed 2 years of intermittent drought on stream channels in a replicated field trial, to measure food web responses to simulated climate change. Drought t...
Article
1. There has been a lack of software available to ecologists for the management, visualisation and analysis of ecological community and food-web data. Researchers have been forced to implement their own data formats and software, often from scratch, resulting in duplicated effort and bespoke solutions that are difficult to apply to future analyses...

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