Lavinia Marin

Lavinia Marin
Delft University of Technology | TU · Department of Values and Technology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

29
Publications
3,694
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52
Citations
Introduction
Assistant professor at the Ethics and Philosophy of Technology Section (Technical University Delft) Current research interests: Social epistemology and the Internet Philosophy and ethics of technology, Philosophy of information and computing, Mediality of thinking, Scaffolding and affordances Critical thinking as embodied and enacted cognition, Philosophy of higher education, Ethics of emerging technologies.
Additional affiliations
January 2020 - present
Delft University of Technology
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Starting from a complex notion of thinking (extended, embodied, social, affective, technically mediated) I inquire how to design online environments which can foster online critical thinking.
February 2019 - December 2019
Delft University of Technology
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2014 - October 2018
KU Leuven
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2012 - June 2014
Uppsala University
Field of study
  • Euroculture
October 2006 - June 2007
University of Bucharest
Field of study
  • Philosophy
October 2002 - June 2006
University of Bucharest
Field of study
  • Philosophy

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
El cambio a la educación en línea que se produjo durante la pandemia del coronavirus puso en primer plano las preguntas sobre el valor y la conveniencia de una universidad totalmente en línea. Este artículo explora hasta qué punto es deseable una universidad totalmente en línea desde una perspectiva educativa, en la que la educación se considera un...
Article
Full-text available
This paper proposes three principles for the ethical design of online social environments aiming to minimise the unintended harms caused by users while interacting online, specifically by enhancing the users’ awareness of the moral load of their interactions. Such principles would need to account for the strong mediation of the digital environment...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has been accompanied on social media by an explosion of information disorders such as inaccurate, misleading and irrelevant information. Countermeasures adopted thus far to curb these informational disorders have had limited success because these did not account for the diversity of informational contexts on social media, focu...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores the norms that govern regular users’ acts of sharing content on social networking sites. Many debates on how to counteract misinformation on Social Networking Sites focus on the epistemic norms of testimony, implicitly assuming that the users’ acts of sharing should fall under the same norms as those for posting original conte...
Preprint
Full-text available
Harnessing benefits and preventing harms of AI cannot be solved alone through technological fixes and regulation. It depends on a complex interplay between technology, societal governance, individual behaviour, organizational and societal dynamics. Enabling people to understand AI and the consequences of its use and design is a crucial element for...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides a retrospective and prospective overview of TU Delft's approach to engineering ethics education. For over twenty years, the Ethics and Philosophy of Technology Section at TU Delft has been at the forefront of engineering ethics education, offering education to a wide range of engineering and design students. The approach develop...
Chapter
This chapter describes experiences of thinking at the university by using examples from two study practices: lecturing and academic writing. Lecturing is approached as a study practice, which, as I explain, entails taking a distance from the instrumental or functionalist understanding of lecturing. Using examples from Gadamer’s writings, I show how...
Chapter
This chapter describes the main gestures enacted in the study practices of lecturing and academic writing in view of establishing their media configurations. To describe the media configurations, I use the concept of sensorium as an analytic tool and I look at how senses are called for or downplayed in gestures of study. After having described how...
Chapter
This book is concerned with establishing the media conditions of possibility for a digital university by fleshing out what are media configurations specific to university study in the first place. This chapter explains why the media question concerning the university has been previously side-stepped in favour of instrumental and cultural approaches...
Chapter
This chapter describes two different practices which attempted to enact a digital university: MOOCs and videoconferencing apps used for lecturing. I show how regular MOOCs show little potential for mediatic displacement, since there is only one source of sensory input which tends to capture and overwhelm the students’ attention, hence very little p...
Book
Full-text available
This book proposes a philosophical exploration of the educational role that media plays in university study practices, with a focus on the practices of lecturing and academic writing. Are the media employed in university study practices mere accessories, or rather constitutive of these practices? While this seems to be a purely theoretical question...
Article
Full-text available
In this article I investigate online misinformation from a media philosophy perspective. I, thus move away from the debate focused on the semantic content, concerned with what is true or not about misinformation. I argue rather that online misinformation is the effect of an informational climate promoted by user micro-behaviours such as liking, sha...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Ethical reflection is considered to be an important competency for engineering ethics education. However it has no clear definition, which makes it difficult to effectively incorporate it into engineering ethics education. This paper proposes an operationalisation of ethical reflection into four learning goals which can help educators explicitly a...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter we argue that emotions are mediated in an incomplete way in online social media because of the heavy reliance on textual messages which fosters a rationalistic bias and an inclination towards less nuanced emotional expressions. This incompleteness can happen either by obscuring emotions, showing less than the original intensity, mis...
Chapter
Full-text available
Lecturing is the only educational form inherited from the universities of the middle ages that is still in use today. However, it seems that lecturing is under threat, as recent calls to do away with lecturing in favour of more dynamic settings, such as the flipped classroom or pre-recorded talks, have found many adherents. In line with the post-cr...
Article
Full-text available
The practice of taking hand-written notes in lectures has been rediscovered recently because of several studies on its learning efficacy in the mainstream media. Students are enjoined to ditch their laptops and return to pen and paper. Such arguments presuppose that notes are taken in order to be revisited after the lecture. Learning is seen to hap...
Article
Full-text available
This article proposes a phenomenological interpretation of nostalgia for communism, a collective feeling expressed typically in most Eastern European countries after the official fall of the communist regimes. While nostalgia for communism may seem like a paradoxical feeling, a sort of Stockholm syndrome at a collective level, this article proposes...
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
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This article brings forth a new perspective concerning the relation between stupidity and thinking by proposing to conceptualise the state of non-thinking in two different ways, situated at the opposite ends of the spectrum of thinking. Two conceptualisations of stupidity are discussed, one critical which follows a French line of continental th...
Research
Full-text available
Review published at http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/lsereviewofbooks/2018/08/24/book-review-the-textbook-and-the-lecture-education-in-the-age-of-new-media-by-norm-friesen/ The Textbook and the Lecture: Education in the Age of New Media. Norm Friesen. Johns Hopkins University Press. 2017.
Article
Full-text available
In the age of web 2.0, the university is constantly challenged to re-adapt its ‘old-fashioned’ pedagogies to the new possibilities opened up by digital technologies. This article proposes a rethinking of the relation between university and (digital) technologies by focusing not on how technologies function in the university, but on their constituti...
Article
Full-text available
This article aims to question the anti-individualist stance in Carl Schmitt’s concept of the political by uncovering the historical bias of Schmitt’s anti–individualism, seen here as one of the main driving forces behind his argument. For Schmitt, the political can take place only when a collectivity is able to declare war to another collectivity o...
Article
Full-text available
Outlines of a Possible Philosophy of the Digital. This article aims to develop the outline of a possible philosophy of the digital, as a proper philosophy with its own domain, questions, methods and theories. The article starts by describing the crisis of linear thinking understood, following Vilém Flusser, as a crisis of historical-causal thinking...
Chapter
Full-text available
În studiul Laviniei Marin, Universitatea şi problema proprietăţii intelectuale, este discutată problema actuală a tipului de universitate pe care îl presupune noua economie a cunoaşterii. Pornind de la interesul pentru cuantificarea performanţelor universităţilor şi stabilirea de ierarhii, autoarea ajunge la unele teme epistemologice privind report...
Article
Full-text available
This paper aims to reconstruct a possible answer to the classical Newman's objection which has been used countless times to argue against structural realism. The reconstruction starts from the new strand of structural realism informational structural realism - authored by Luciano Floridi. Newman's objection had previously stated that all propositio...
Thesis
Full-text available
The main research question that this paper aims to answer is: ‘In what does today’s attack on humanities consist and how can humanities be defended?’ In order to answer this research question, one needs first to describe how the humanities have argued for their usefulness before the Bologna Process; second, provide reasons for the claim that the Bo...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, I will try to answer the question: How are we supposed to assess the expert’s opinion in an argument from the position of an outsider to the specialized field? by placing it in the larger context of the political status of epistemic authority. In order to do this I will first sketch the actual debate around the problem of expertise i...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Flusser acknowledges many times the influence of Husserl and Heidegger on his thinking, but then he goes on to explain that, for him, phenomenology is about the disappearance of the subject-object categories and replacing them with a dual-pole relation. See for example his essay on Edmund Husserl published in the special issue of Intellect (2011) where Flusser says: ''It can be shown that it [knowledge] is a dynamic relation, a sort of arrow. It points from somewhere (a supposed subject), to somewhere (a supposed object). It is ‘intentional’. I can call the point to which it intends, from a. ‘subject’, and -the point to which it intends, to an ‘object’." {Flusser 2012 #338D: 235}
This is an explicit account of intentionality but, in his later philosophy, Flusser does not mention intentionality, yet he subtitles at least two of his books as 'a phenomenology of... gestures/ media'.
In short, what makes Flusser's media work phenomenological insofar as he does not speak of intentionalities there?
Question
In his Philosophy of Photography, Flusser posits imagination as the first kind of human thinking and it consists in abstracting pictures from reality (from a 4-dimensional reality, humans abstracted 2-dimensional pictures). Then he defines linear thinking as a further abstraction, from man-made images to texts. So from 2-dimensional pictures to one-dimensional texts. My question is why cannot humans produce directly texts starting from reality? Why do all texts have to come from images? What is the conceptual difficulty in having texts signify directly the world?
Quotes:
'Texts do not signify the world; they signify the images they tear up.' (Flusser, 2000, p. 11) and
'texts are a metacode of images' (Flusser, 2000, p. 11)

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
COMET is a two-year research project of the Ethics and Philosophy of Technology Section (TPM), funded by the 4TU.Centre for Engineering Education. The project is focused on the future of engineering ethics education at TU Delft. It is both retrospective and prospective: looking back at the successes and challenges from the last 20 years of integrating ethics into the curriculum at TU Delft, and identifying and proposing best practices for ethics education going forward. Research Objectives The project consists of three phases: 1. Laying a theoretical foundation through an overview of the state-of-the-art research on engineering ethics and engineering ethics education. 2.Developing our own tripartite framework for thinking about best practices in engineering ethics education, based on the establishment of three distinct but interrelated domains of ethical reflection important for the engineer (reflection on one’s practical identity qua engineer, reflection on the structural-systemic context of the engineering practice, and reflection on the ethical impact of engineering activities, i.e. products, artifacts, designs) 3.Building off our theoretical model to offer practical recommendations – at the level of both form and content – for teaching engineering ethics at TU Delft
Project
The world around us is increasingly cute-ified. Cozy, fluffy, cute, hygge, comfy, etc. The public space is turning into a comfortable, intimate space where no discomfort is possible. Smoothed out. Coziness has invaded cafes, restaurants, parks. Increasingly spaces where we are addressed as customers and asked to consume are also spaces where comfort imposes the dominant mood. Why such an increased obsession for comfyness and an avoidance of discomfort? If anything, this tendency is anti-Stoic, but it could give an accurate picture of the Western way of life. Preliminary hypothesis: any space can be a study space, but in practice, a space where one is feeling too comfortable is not a space ready for the violence of study. This project will first gather images of the transformation of the public space into a comfortable space, a space where it is very hard to be disturbed, displaced. In the next phase something will happen with these images. No idea yet what. Let's see.
Project
Postdoctoral Fellowship at the TU Delft with the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Horizon 2020 co-funded "LEaDing Fellows Programme” There is a growing concern that online social platforms are actively facilitating the spread of misinformation with detrimental effects for democratic citizenship. One of the most popular solutions to counteract this tendency has been the proposal to implement education for critical thinking at younger ages and at all levels of education, following the intuition that a critical thinker should also a critical online user who will not take things for granted nor spread misinformation further. However, the current project aims to problematise the assumption behind this solution by raising the question whether critical thinking can be exercised just as easily in online environments as it is in offline environments. The hypothesis proposed here is that the (technical) environment in which we are asked to think matters more than it was previously thought for exercising critical thinking (CT). The original starting point of this project is the premise that critical thinking has been thus far conceptualised as an individual, personal trait, following an undisclosed internalist theory of the mind. However, if we were to reconceptualise CT following an extended and embodied theory of the mind, then this would allow for a new understanding of the online environment as a tool to think with or against, thus implying that online informational resources could be designed in different ways as to allow for more critical thinking. By shifting the focus of the critical thinking discussion from the individual subject to the environment in which the user exercises these capacities, it makes sense to study which environments inhibit or foster critical thinking, with a focus on online platforms. This project has two major aims: first, to re-conceptualise critical thinking in light of 4E cognition developments, looking at the embodied, affective, enactive and socially extended features of cognition in the case of critical thinking. The second aim is to research the kind of design features that an online environment needs to have minimally in order to become a better environment for critical thinking and theorise the relation between the emergence of critical thinking online and the design features of the informational environment.