Laurence Lin

Laurence Lin
IQVIA

Biological Sciences, Ph.D.

About

23
Publications
2,729
Reads
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157
Citations
Introduction
My career goal is to use the best Mathematical and statistical ideas to support sciences
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - present
IQVIA
Position
  • Centralized Monitiring Lead
January 2018 - August 2020
University of Virginia
Position
  • Research Associate
August 2015 - December 2017
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Spatially distributed hydrological models are commonly employed to optimize the locations of engineering control measures across a watershed. Yet, parameter screening exercises that aim to reduce the dimensionality of the calibration search space are typically completed only for gauged locations, like the watershed outlet, and use screening metrics...
Article
Full-text available
Stream restoration is widely used to mitigate the degradation of urban stream channels, protect infrastructure, and reduce sediment and nutrient loadings to receiving waterbodies. Stabilizing and revegetating riparian areas can also provide recreational opportunities and amenities, and improve quality of life for nearby residents. In this project,...
Article
The spatial variation of soil moisture over very small areas (<100 m²) can have nonlinear impacts on cycling and flux rates resulting in bias if it is not considered, but measuring this variation is difficult over extensive temporal and spatial scales. Most studies examining spatial variation of soil moisture were conducted at hillslope (0.01 km²)...
Preprint
Full-text available
Spatially distributed hydrologic models are commonly employed to optimize the locations of engineering control measures across a watershed. Yet, parameter screening exercises that aim to reduce the dimensionality of the calibration search space are typically completed only for gauged locations, like the watershed outlet, and use screening metrics t...
Article
Public utilities may respond to demand or supply fluctuations by adjusting prices to ration quantity. This approach's efficacy and distributional impacts depend on households' heterogeneous price sensitivity, which we estimate in a market for residential water usage. Our household-level panel data features a large change in marginal water prices an...
Article
Urbanization increases stormwater runoff into streams, resulting in channel erosion, and increases in sediment and nutrient delivery to receiving water bodies. Stream restoration is widely used as a Best Management Practice to stabilize banks and reduce sediment and nutrient loads. While most instream nutrient retention measurements are often limit...
Article
Full-text available
To estimate the robustness of hydrologic models under projected future climate change, researchers test transferability between climatically contrasting observed periods. This approach can only assess the performance changes induced by altered precipitation and related environmental dynamics (e.g. greening under wet conditions), since the instrumen...
Article
Full-text available
Climate and land cover change strongly shape water resources management, but understanding their joint impacts is extremely challenging. Consequently, there is limited research of their integrated effects on water supply systems, and even fewer studies that rigorously account for infrastructure investment and management interventions. We utilize ec...
Article
Full-text available
The potential for increased loads of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in streams and rivers is a concern for regulating the water quality in water supply watersheds. With increasing hydroclimatic variability related to global warming and shifts in forest ecosystem community and structure, understanding and predicting the magnitude and variability of...
Presentation
Full-text available
Catskill Mountain watersheds in New York State have historically experienced soil and stream acidification due to high atmospheric deposition of SO2 and NOx, and this raises the question of how it may affect the water resources of the New York City water supply. The production and transport of nitrate depends on both hydrologic and ecosystem proces...
Article
Land use planners, landscape architects, and water resource managers are using Green Infrastructure (GI) designs in urban environments to promote ecosystem services including mitigation of storm water flooding and water quality degradation. An expanded set of urban sustainability goals also includes increasing carbon sequestration, songbird habitat...
Article
Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOA and AOB) perform the rate-limiting step of nitrification, a biogeochemical process that controls the availability of inorganic nitrogen in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We sought to investigate field values of AOA and AOB ammonia-uptake kinetics along with domain-level contributions to ammonia oxida...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Climate change and forest disturbance have the potential to cause degradation of water quality in the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. Increases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are a concern for NYC because it may result in increases in disinfection by-product precursors in the water supply. This project seeks to establish the linkage...
Chapter
Full-text available
We developed a computer model to evaluate the effects of in-stream processes on nutrient concentrations and then examined potential climate change effects on these processes. Our model includes stream spiraling, ecological stoichiometry, and autotrophic and heterotrophic processes. We found significant synergistic interactions between microbes that...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrification is a biologically mediated nutrient transformation, which influences the availability of inorganic nitrogen to other microorganisms and plants and mediates mobility of nitrogen in the environment. Ammonia oxidation, the rate-limiting step of nitrification, is performed by two groups of microbes: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bac...
Article
The importance of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in controlling nitrogen dynamics in streams is a key interest of ecologists studying dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export from watersheds. In this study, we coupled a stream model with a terrestrial ecohydrological model and conducted a global sensitivity analysis to evaluate the relative im...
Article
Field experiment and modeling studies have shown that microbial processes during leaf decomposition can modify detritus nutrients and inorganic nutrients in the system. In this study, we developed three models (Models I, II, and III) for leaf decomposition in a shaded headwater stream with little nutrient input, and we predicted the nutrient patter...
Article
The constant nutrient addition technique has been used extensively to measure nutrient uptake in streams. However, this technique is impractical for large streams, and the pulse nutrient addition (PNA) has been suggested as an alternative. We developed a computer model to simulate Monod kinetics nutrient uptake in large rivers and used this model t...
Article
Full-text available
We consider a stoichiometric population model of two producers and one consumer. Stoichiometry can be thought of as the tracking of food quality in addition to food quantity. Our model assumes a reduced rate of conversion of biomass from producer to consumer when food quality is low. The model is open for carbon but closed for nutrient. The introdu...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we consider a stoichiometric population model of two producers and one consumer. It is a generalization of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur population growth model, which is a one-producer, one-consumer population model without stoichiometry. The generalization involves two steps: 1) adding a second producer which competes with the first, an...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
As the predominant land cover type in the 1600 sq. mi. NYC drinking water supply watersheds, forest ecosystems play an important yet poorly understood role in determining the water, nutrient, sediment, and pathogen inputs to the reservoir system. The forest ecosystem modeling project will: a) investigate the current biological, physical, and chemical conditions, and management practices of the forested lands in the NYC water supply watersheds, using all available data sources and tools including remote sensing; b) review available forest models and develop model applications that integrate forest inventory and assessment data with key watershed processes that control forest hydrology, biogeochemistry, and ecosystem structure and function; and c) apply these models and data to project potential effects of changing land use, watershed management, and climate on water quantity and quality of the NYC water supply and the sustainability of the forest ecosystem(https://rfcuny.org/careers/postings?pvnID=HC-1507-000620)