Lauren Smith

Lauren Smith
University of Leeds · School of Biology

BSc MSc PhD

About

7
Publications
2,510
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
119
Citations
Citations since 2017
7 Research Items
119 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023010203040
2017201820192020202120222023010203040
2017201820192020202120222023010203040
2017201820192020202120222023010203040
Introduction
I currently work on modelling free-roaming dog population dynamics and creating a user-friendly application to estimate dog population size and predict the impact of local intervention strategies. I am investigating the effectiveness of different population management approaches using mark-recapture analyses and systems dynamics modelling approaches.
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - March 2021
University of Leeds
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2017 - July 2020
University of Leeds
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
January 2017 - July 2020
University of Leeds
Field of study
  • Investigating the sustainability of the Catch-Neuter-Release program of stray dog populations.
September 2015 - September 2016
Zoological Society of London / Royal Veterinary College
Field of study
  • Wild Animal Biology
September 2014 - September 2015
The University of Edinburgh
Field of study
  • International Animal Health

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Full-text available
Free-roaming dog population management is conducted to mitigate risks to public health, livestock losses, wildlife conservation, and dog health and welfare. This study aimed to determine attitudes towards free-roaming dogs and their management and describe dog ownership practices in three European countries. We distributed an online questionnaire c...
Article
Full-text available
For farmed species, good health and welfare is a win-win situation: both the animals and producers can benefit. In recent years, animal welfare scientists have embraced cognitive sciences to rise to the challenge of determining an animal’s internal state in order to better understand its welfare needs and by extension, the needs of larger groups of...
Article
Full-text available
The worldwide population of domestic dogs is estimated at approximately 700 million, with around 75% classified as “free-roaming”. Where free-roaming dogs exist in high densities, there are significant implications for public health, animal welfare, and wildlife. Approaches to manage dog populations include culling, fertility control, and shelterin...
Preprint
Full-text available
Free-roaming dogs can present significant challenges to public health, wildlife conservation, and livestock production. Their own welfare may also be a concern, as free-roaming dogs can experience poor health and welfare. Dog population management is widely conducted to mitigate these issues. To ensure efficient use of resources, it is critical tha...
Preprint
Full-text available
Overabundant, free-roaming dog populations are associated with risks to public health, livestock losses, wildlife conservation, and dog health and welfare. Dog population management is conducted to mitigate these issues. Assessing dog population management strategies is important to determine their effectiveness, efficiency, and long-term impact. I...
Article
Full-text available
Wild animals are used in scientific research in a wide variety of contexts both in situ and ex situ. Guidelines for best practice, where they exist, are not always clearly linked to animal welfare and may instead have their origins in practicality. This is complicated by a lack of clarity about indicators of welfare for wild animals, and to what ex...
Poster
Full-text available
Poster for UFAW conference 2019 "Advancing animal welfare science: How do we get there? - Who is it good for?"

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The overall aim is to investigate and compare different methods of long-term dog population control and management.