Lauren Braley

Lauren Braley
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa | UH Manoa · Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy
Currently starting the second year of my PhD graduate studies, working on biofumigation techologies.

About

2
Publications
170
Reads
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10
Citations
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
10 Citations
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Introduction
My name is Lauren and I am currently a second-year PhD candidate in Dr. Koon-Hui Wang's lab at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. My current research revolves around the use of dried and ground papaya seed (a waste product in the Hawaiian papaya industry) as a potential biofumigation technology. It produces a volatile compound known as benzyl isothiocyanate or BITC which is similar to the volatile produced by mustard and oil radish, allyl isothiocyanate or AITC.
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - July 2021
Washington State University
Position
  • Graduate Research Assistant
Description
  • Master's graduate research assistant working on the use of nanopore sequencing technology as a plant diagnostic tool in potatoes and potato field soil.
Education
August 2021 - May 2025
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Field of study
  • Tropical Plant Pathology
August 2019 - May 2021
Washington State University
Field of study
  • Plant Pathology
August 2015 - May 2019
Washington State University
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Publications

Publications (2)
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this research is to examine the potential of using papaya ground seed (PGS) as a biofumigant in mitigating the disease incidence of 1) Fusarium wilt and 2) root-knot nematode infection or galling index on lettuce or kai choi in greenhouse pots.
Article
Full-text available
The amplification of specific nucleic acid sequences with high specificity and sensitivity is an essential technique for pathogen detection. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is a rapid isothermal amplification method. Here, we demonstrate the end-point and real-time detection of Spongospora subterranea f. sp. subterranea (Sss) using RPA a...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The objective of this research is to examine the potential of using papaya ground seed (PGS) as a biofumigant in mitigating the disease incidence of 1) Fusarium wilt, 2) Rhizoctonia rot, 3) root-knot nematode infection or galling index, and 4) reniform nematode infection on lettuce, kai choi, cowpea, and zucchini.