Lauren P Angel

Lauren P Angel
The University of Queensland | UQ

PhD

About

11
Publications
1,764
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114
Citations

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Stable isotope analyses, particularly of carbon (δ 13 C) and nitrogen (δ 15 N), are used to investigate ecological relationships among species. For marine predators, research has shown the main factors influencing their intra-specific and intra-individual isotopic variation are geographical movements and changes in the composition of diet over time...
Article
Full-text available
Foraging is a behaviour that can be influenced by multiple factors and is highly plastic. Recent studies have shown consistency in individual foraging behaviour has serious ecological and evolutionary implications within species and populations. Such information is crucial to understand how species select habitats, and how such selection might allo...
Article
Animal diets often vary according to age, sex, experience and/or individual preferences, which, when maintained over time, can lead to behavioural consistency and individual specialisations within populations. In addition, behavioural and dietary similarity within breeding pairs confers reproductive benefits in some species. We investigated inter-...
Article
Full-text available
The predictability of prey due to oceanographic features can result in large aggregations of apex predators. Central place foragers, such as seabirds, are limited in their foraging duration and range during the breeding period, which can restrict their ability to reach such locations. Segregation by colony and sex can further restrict foraging rang...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of top predator foraging adaptability is imperative for predicting their biological response to environmental variability. While seabirds have developed highly specialised techniques to locate prey, little is known about intraspecific variation in foraging strategies with many studies deriving information from uniform oceanic environments...
Article
Full-text available
Recent international initiatives have promoted a number of different approaches to identify marine Important Bird and biodiversity Areas (IBAs), which are important areas for foraging, migrating or over-wintering seabirds. The ‘Foraging Radius Approach’ is one of these and uses known foraging range and habitat preferences to predict the size and lo...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual size dimorphism is widespread throughout seabird taxa and several drivers leading to its evolution have been hypothesised. While the Australasian Gannet (Morus serrator) has previously been considered nominally monomorphic, recent studies have documented sexual segregation in diet and foraging areas, traits often associated with size dimorph...
Article
Full-text available
Determining the foraging behaviour of free-ranging marine animals is fundamental for assessing their habitat use and how they may respond to changes in the environment. How- ever, despite recent advances in bio-logging technology, collecting information on both at- sea movement patterns and activity budgets still remains difficult in small pelagic...
Thesis
This research examined extrinsic and intrinsic factors influencing the foraging behaviour of a large seabird, the Australasian gannet, at two colonies along the Victorian coastline. Given the rapid warming of south-eastern Australian waters, this research highlights potential drivers of variability and limitations for the species’ survival.
Article
Full-text available
During the breeding season, seabirds adopt a central place foraging strategy and are restricted in their foraging range by the fasting ability of their partner/chick and the cost of commuting between the prey resources and the nest. Because of the spatial and temporal variability of marine ecosystems, individuals must adapt their behaviour to incre...

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