Laurajane Smith

Laurajane Smith
Australian National University | ANU · Centre for Heritage and Museums Studies

Doctor of Philosophy, University of Sydney

About

101
Publications
63,024
Reads
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Citations
Introduction
Laurajane is director for the Centre for Heritage and Museum Studies within the School of Archaeology and Anthropology, the Australian National University. I am currently writing up a long term project that has involved interviewing over 4,500 visitors to 45 different museums and heritage sites in England, Australia and the United States. Six different genre of history museums/sites were included in this study.
Additional affiliations
January 2010 - present
Australian National University
Position
  • Professor
October 2000 - December 2009
The University of York
Position
  • Professor (Full)
February 1996 - September 2000
UNSW Sydney
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
February 1999 - July 2000
UNSW Sydney
Field of study
  • Higher Education
July 1990 - November 1996
The University of Sydney
Field of study
  • Archaeology and heritage studies
February 1980 - November 1983
The University of Sydney
Field of study
  • Archaeology

Publications

Publications (101)
Article
Full-text available
Heritage sites and places are often mobilized to represent a group's identity and sense of place and belonging. This paper will illustrate how heritage and museum visiting, as a leisure activity, facilitates or impedes recognition and redistribution in direct and indirect ways. Drawing on extensive qualitative interviews with visitors to 45 heritag...
Article
Full-text available
O artigo, elaborado como Aula Inaugural para o Mestrado Profissional em Preservação do Patrimônio Cultural, do Instituto do Patrimônio Histórico e Artístico Nacional (IPHAN), discute as implicações da noção de “Discurso Autorizado de Patrimônio”, cunhada pela autora, para a prática profissional da gestão do patrimônio. Nesse sentido, apresenta inic...
Chapter
History: Theory and Method Articles
Chapter
Drawing on interviews with visitors to labour history/industrial sites in the the United States, Australia and England this paper examines the memory and identity work that people undertake in relation to sites of labour history. It unpacks the emotional repertories that frames this work. In doing so, the paper looks at the ways people use their vi...
Article
This paper aims to extend understanding of the way Chinese domestic tourists and local communities understand and use the World Heritage Ancient Villages of Xidi and Hongcun. Tourism in each of these villages is managed differently, with the tourism companies respectively managed by a local collective and by an external operator. The paper argues t...
Article
In recent years an interest in ‘critical heritage studies’ (CHS) has grown significantly – its differentiation from ‘heritage studies’ rests on its emphasis of cultural heritage as a political, cultural, and social phenomenon. But how original or radical are the concepts and aims of CHS, and why has it apparently become useful or meaningful to talk...
Book
Full-text available
Emotion, Affective Practices, and the Past in the Presentis a response to debates in the humanities and social sciences about the use of emotion. This timely and unique book explores the ways emotion is embroiled and used in contemporary engagements with the past, particularly in contexts such as heritage sites, museums, commemorations, political r...
Book
Full-text available
Emotion, Affective Practices, and the Past in the Presentis a response to debates in the humanities and social sciences about the use of emotion. This timely and unique book explores the ways emotion is embroiled and used in contemporary engagements with the past, particularly in contexts such as heritage sites, museums, commemorations, political r...
Book
Full-text available
https://rdcu.be/4fw6 for copy of book - available until 20 October 2018. Safeguarding Intangible Heritage assesses and reappraises the field of intangible heritage. It examines how policy has been implemented and explores its specific impact on intangible heritage, knowledge bearers and communities, and the implications of this for the continuing...
Article
As the authors of the Association of Critical Heritage Studies manifesto (Campbell & Smith 2011), there are aspects of the debate piece by González-Ruibal et al . (above) that we have no trouble agreeing with, but we take issue with other elements. This paper sets up far too many straw people, based on a limited engagement with the archaeological a...
Article
This paper explores the contradictions of the advent, dissemination and use of the terms “intangible value” and “tangible value.” We examine their logical and grammatical incoherence, and the “work” that these strange terms, so often used in tandem, do to domesticate what are for some people the uncomfortable implications of the concept of intangib...
Article
Full-text available
Nostalgia for some is pointless and sentimental, for others reactionary and futile. Where does that leave those of us interested in labour history and heritage – is it all just ‘smokestack nostalgia’? Using interviews with visitors, volunteers and staff at sites and museums of industrial and working class heritage in England, the United States and...
Article
Full-text available
Qualitative interviews were undertaken with visitors at five museums that display the histories and experiences of immigration in the United States and Australia. This paper outlines the range of embodied performative practices of meaning making that visitors undertook during their visits and the meanings and political values that they created or r...
Chapter
Full-text available
If, as Mercer (: 1) argues, “feeling is believing,” then the emotional states and experiences engendered by heritage and heritage tourism will significantly influence the meanings, values and messages individuals will construct or have reinforced as they engage with heritage places. There is now an extensive literature that argues emotions are cent...
Chapter
Full-text available
Affect and emotion, like memory before them, have recently become a focus of discussion in the social sciences. This chapter reviews the way emotion has been addressed in heritage studies: we argue that any engagement with affect and emotion needs to be based on a pragmatic approach, which starts from an understanding that emotions are not only cul...
Chapter
Full-text available
The idea that visitors attend museums and heritage sites for the purposes of education or learning has dominated debate in both museology and heritage management. This chapter questions both the degree to which people go to museums seeking education or learning opportunities, and the degree to which museums may be perceived as educational instituti...
Article
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2007 marked the bicentenary of Britain's abolition of its slave trade. This paper outlines the findings of interviews undertaken with 1498 visitors to eight museum exhibitions marking the bicentenary. One of the major findings of the research was the degree to which visitors from different self-identified ethnic groups responded to the both the exh...
Article
Smith Claire & Wobst H. Martin (ed.). Indigenous Archaeologies: Decolonizing Theory and Practice (One World Archaeology 47). xxiv+ 408 pages, 84 illustrations, 6 tables. 2005. Abingdon & New York: Routledge; 0-415-30965-4 hardback £85. - Volume 82 Issue 315 - Laurajane Smith
Article
Full-text available
Heritage sites and museums displaying history and culture are used in many different ways by visitors. Understanding the ways in which people use and engage with sites of heritage allows a greater understanding not only of the ways in which history and the past are understood, but more importantly how the past is actively used in the present by ind...
Chapter
Introduction Part 1: The Idea of Heritage 1. The Discourse of Heritage 2. Heritage as Cultural Process Part 2: Authorised Heritage 3. Authorising Institutions of Heritage 4. The 'Manored' Past: The Banality of Grandiloquence 5. Fellas, Fossils and Country - The Riversleigh Landscape Part 3: Responses to Authorised Heritage 6. Labour Heritage: Perfo...
Chapter
Full-text available
https://www.routledge.com/series/KICH
Chapter
This edited volume critically engages with contemporary scholarship on museums and their engagement with the communities they purport to serve and represent. Foregrounding new curatorial strategies, it addresses a significant gap in the available literature, exploring some of the complex issues arising from recent approaches to collaboration betwee...
Article
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This review article draws on interviews with visitors to the Stockman's Hall of Fame, Longreach, and identifies and discusses the gendered cultural work that is undertaken by visitors during their visit.
Article
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This paper summarises previous arguments about the existence and nature of a Western and Eurocentric Authorised Heritage Discourse and examines the consequences this discourse has for archaeological practices associated with community engagement and outreach. This discourse frames archaeology heritage practices and works to conceive heritage as spe...
Article
This article explores the ways in which the multiplicity of the meaning of heritage is overshadowed, so much so that a particular idea about 'heritage' has come to represent the dominant and legitimized way of thinking, writing, and talking about heritage management practices. It argues that the dominant way of seeing heritage-'authorized heritage...
Book
https://www.routledge.com/products/9780415611152
Article
Full-text available
Introduction to a special issue addressing working class heritage. The introduction highlights the importance of New Working Class Studies to the development of critical heritage studies. This introduction should be read in conjunction with the book: Smith, L., Shackel, P.A. and Campbell, G. eds., 2011. Heritage, labour, and the working classes....
Article
Full-text available
Are we now living in a new geological epoch called the Anthropocene? Geo-scientists discuss whether there is a need for a new concept covering the last 250 years' immense human impact on the earth. How are we going to understand and define 'heritage' and archaeology in a rapidly changing global environment? The 'linguistic turn' in humanities and s...
Article
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Este artículo sostiene que el �patrimonio� no es una �cosa�, un lugar ni un evento intangible, más bien es una representación o un proceso cultural interesado en negociar, crear y recrear recuerdos, valores y significados culturales. Este proceso se ve oscurecido por el discurso patrimonial autorizado. El artículo analiza de manera crítica el discu...
Article
Full-text available
The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
Book
Full-text available
https://www.routledge.com/series/KICH
Article
Full-text available
This article investigates the cultural memory of the bicentenary of the abolition of the slave trade in Britain. It examines official government responses and considers how these were replicated in popular culture, drawing on the film Amazing Grace. The study highlights the rhetoric employed to distance the past of the transatlantic slave trade fro...
Article
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This paper revisits the notion of ‘community’ within the field of heritage, examining the varied ways in which tensions between different groups and their aspirations arise and are mediated. Our focus is a close examination of the conceptual disjunction that exists between a range of popular, political and academic attempts to define and negotiate...
Article
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Nancy Fraser's model of the politics of recognition is used to examine how ethical practices are interconnected with wider struggles for recognition and social justice. This paper focuses on the concept of 'heritage' and the way it is often uncritically linked to 'identity' to illustrate how expert knowledge can become implicated in struggles for r...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/about/who-we-are/how-we-are-run/heritage-for- all/missing-out-conference/
Book
http://www.bloomsbury.com/au/heritage-communities-and-archaeology-9781472521330/
Book
Full-text available
https://www.routledge.com/series/KICH
Chapter
Full-text available
https://www.routledge.com/series/KICH
Chapter
The process of protecting sites, artefacts and places of archaeological value - often referred to as cultural resource management (CRM) or archaeological heritage management - is established, defined and regulated by a range of national laws and international conventions, charters and other agreements. It is a process that is ostensibly designed to...
Article
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This paper assesses the recent Heritage Protection Review (HPR) process, which culminated in the publication of the Heritage White Paper “Heritage protection for the 21st century” (DCMS, 2007). It argues that although the White Paper makes laudable and useful attempts at streamlining and clarifying the management and protection process, many of its...
Chapter
The politics of identity cannot simply be dismissed as empty or abstract gesturing. The conflicts that occur around the rights to control the expression of cultural identity have important material consequences for struggles over economic resources and struggles for equity and human rights. This chapter examines the role that archaeologists, often...
Article
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This controversial book is a survey of how relationships between indigenous peoples and the archaeological establishment have got into difficulty, and a crucial pointer to how to move forward from this point. With lucid appraisals of key debates such as NAGPRA, Kennewick and the repatriation of Tasmanian artefacts, Laurajane Smith dissects the natu...
Article
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This paper reviews the methodological utility of Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) in heritage studies. Using the Burra Charter as a case study we argue that the way we talk, write and otherwise represent heritage both constitutes and is constituted by the operation of a dominant discourse. In identifying the discursive construction of heritage, th...
Article
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Examining international case studies including USA, Asia, Australia and New Zealand, Laurajane Smith identifies and explores the use of heritage throughout the world. Challenging the idea that heritage value is self-evident, and that things must be preserved because they have an inherent importance, Smith forcefully demonstrates that heritage value...
Article
Rowan Yorke & Baram Uzi (ed.). Marketing heritage: archaeology and the consumption of the past. x+315 pages, 20 illustrations, tables. 2004. Walnut Creek (CA): AltaMira; 0-7591-0342-9 paperback $29.95 & £22.95; 0-7591-0341-0 hardback $75. - Volume 79 Issue 306 - Laurajane Smith
Article
Full-text available
The editor’s question “ who do human skeletons belong to ?” ( Antiquity 78: 5) can be answered positively, but it must be answered in context. The question was prompted by reports from the Working Group on Human Remains established by the British government’s Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) in 2001 to review the current legal status...
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Community involvement in heritage management is an issue that is increasingly being debated within heritage studies and management agencies. This paper examines a case study from Queensland, Australia, of a community-initiated and controlled heritage project. The paper outlines and discusses the implications that this project has to an understandin...
Article
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What are the consequences of using the discourse of archaeological knowledge in cultural heritage management (CHM)? In this article the inter-relationship of archaeological theory and practice, CHM and the politics of identity is analysed, using as a case study the history of archaeological and CHM practice in south-eastern Australia. A critical re...
Article
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Using a case study of the recent history of archaeology in Australia, the paper details how Cultural Heritage Management, in addition to protecting the archaeological data base, actually protects archaeological access to it. In offering this protection, archaeologists involved in Cultural Heritage Management become the regulators of archaeological...
Article
Full-text available
This paper details the role that archaeologists and archaeological knowledge played in the lobbying for, and framing of, Aboriginal heritage legislation in south-eastern Australia (New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania). The central contention of the paper is that a fortuitous set of circumstances during the 1960's and 1970's privileged archaeolog...
Article
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Abstract: Material culture provides what Buchli (1995) calls 'brutally physical' resources, linked to history and the past, which can be drawn on in an active process of re/creating cultural identities. Consequently, the use of material culture as the data of archaeological research has led to the questioning of archaeologists and their research pr...
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Equity and workplace issues within cultural heritage management have influenced the development of feminist archaeology in Australia. This has resulted in an explicit recognition in Australian feminist debates that practice and theoretical expression are linked. Although this link has been recognized, it remains abstracted, and little has yet been...
Article
Postprocessual archaeology has been extensively debated in the European and American literature. Yet little of this debate has been either related to, or conducted within, an Australian context. In this paper I want to explore and define postprocessual theory, and to examine the implications of this debate for Australian archaeology. It is my conte...
Article
The postmodern, or ‘postprocessual’, tendency in contemporary archaeology pays much attention in its rhetoric to that wider public, that wider constituency whose views of the past may not match much or at all with the academics. What happens when the realities of archaeology in the real world meet with those of postmodern theory?
Article
This paper offers some comments about the relationship between cultural heritage management and the tourism industry based on our experiences of teaching a subject called 'Environmental and Cultural Tourism' at Charles Sturt University (CSU). This is a third-year subject offered to students taking a tourism major as part of a Bachelor of Business d...
Article
The conference was held at Charles Sturt University, Albury, between 8 and 11 of February. There were 102 registrations. Overseas visitors included Dr Meg Conkey (USA), Dr Joan Gero (USA), Dr Alison Wylie (Canada), Chris Jenkins (NZ), Pamela Russell (NZ), and Beverly Parslow (NZ).

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
I am currently writing a book based on 4,502 interviews with visitors to heritage sites and history and cultural museums in the United States, England and Australia.