Laura Richman

Laura Richman
Duke University | DU · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

PhD

About

46
Publications
29,877
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6,837
Citations

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
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Due in part to Hillary Clinton’s historic candidacy, gender was a salient dimension of the 2016 US presidential election. In particular, the purported masculinity and femininity of each candidate was on display, discussed extensively in the media, and may have had an impact on citizens’ own gendered beliefs and behaviors. In a longitudinal study of...
Article
Background: Intersectionality is a powerful theoretical framework that is useful in describing the lived experiences of people with multiple marginalized statuses. By focusing on power and domination (e.g., racism, sexism), and the ways in which they are inextricably linked and mutually constructing, researchers can better understand experiences o...
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Research on rural health needs to represent the diverse demographics of these regions by carefully considering the distinct characteristics, inequities, and stressors occurring in rural communities. Drawing from our own findings and other empirical investigations examining diverse rural communities, we propose several considerations to guide future...
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Affirming one’s racial identity may help protect against the harmful effects of racial exclusion on substance use cognitions. This study examined whether racial versus self-affirmation (vs. no affirmation) buffers against the effects of racial exclusion on substance use willingness and substance use word associations in Black young adults. It also...
Article
The current study reports on the efficacy of a multi-faceted motivationally designed undergraduate enrichment summer program for supporting science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) persistence. Structural equation modeling was used to compare summer program participants (n = 186), who participated in the program between their first and seco...
Chapter
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Interpersonal discrimination contributes to health inequalities for disadvantaged groups across numerous stigmatized identities. This effect has been found using cross-sectional, prospective, and experimental designs. Interpersonal discrimination has been associated with poor health across a wide range of mental health outcomes, including greater r...
Article
Self-concept expansion predicts a range of adaptive outcomes. An intriguing possible cause of self-concept expansion is the posing of one’s body expansively, that is, “power posing.” In Study 1 (N = 65), we found that body expansion had an effect, of moderate magnitude (d = 0.58), on self-concept size in college women as measured by the Twenty Stat...
Article
In this research, we propose a hypothesized model that outlines pathways by which stigma impacts interpersonal behavior within close relationships through avoidant-oriented friendship goals. We also examine how stigma concealment moderates the extent to which these avoidant goals are activated. In Study 1, among people with mental illness (PWMI), t...
Article
Although many studies have examined the short-term effects of rejection in laboratory settings, few have investigated the impact of rejection over time or in real-world contexts. The university sorority recruitment process offers a unique opportunity to address these shortcomings. Women participating in sorority recruitment were surveyed directly b...
Article
Perceived discrimination is associated with increased engagement in unhealthy behaviors. We propose an identity-based pathway to explain this link. Drawing on an identity-based motivation model of health behaviors (Oyserman, Fryberg, & Yoder, 2007), we propose that perceptions of discrimination lead individuals to engage in ingroup-prototypical beh...
Book
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This collection highlights innovations to encourage reduction in homeowner energy use. The ideas described grew out of a summit at Duke University that brought together people from research institutions, county sustainability offices, government agencies, consultant organizations, architecture firms, building contractors, and real estate agencies—s...
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There is a strong need to increase the number of undergraduate students who pursue careers in science to provide the “fuel” that will power a science and technology–driven U.S. economy. Prior research suggests that both evidence-based teaching methods and early undergraduate research experiences may help to increase retention rates in the sciences....
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Heteronormativity is the presumption of heterosexuality as the default sexual orientation and can result in discrimination against the lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) population. This study serves as one of the first experimental studies to examine heteronormative perceptions in communication and their effects on practitioner-patient relationships...
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After people experience social rejection, one tactic to restore a sense of belonging is to selectively attend to and readily perceive cues that connote acceptance. The multimotive model of responses to rejection suggests that contextual features of the rejection are important determinants of how people are motivated to respond. According to this mo...
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This research validates a computerized dietary selection task (Food-Linked Virtual Response or FLVR) for use in studies of food consumption. In two studies, FLVR task responses were compared with measures of health consciousness, mood, body mass index, personality, cognitive restraint toward food, and actual food selections from a buffet table. The...
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What makes low social status toxic to well-being? To internalize social status is to believe the self is responsible for it. We hypothesized that the more people internalize low subjective social status, the more their basic psychological needs are thwarted. Experiment 1 randomly assigned participants to imagine themselves in low, middle, or high s...
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Tweet Disadvantaged groups face stigma that increases inequality in health and well-being, but evidence-based policy can help to reduce health inequalities. Key Points • • Stigma and discrimination at both the interpersonal and societal levels can harm health. • • Attention should be paid to current policies surrounding college admissions, same-sex...
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Introduction and aims: In recent years, unprecedented levels of Internet access and the widespread growth of emergent communication technologies have resulted in significantly greater population access for substance use researchers. Despite the research potential of such technologies, the use of the Internet to recruit individuals for participatio...
Article
Discriminatory experiences are not only momentarily distressing, but can also increase risk for lasting physical and psychological problems. Specifically, significantly higher rates of depression and depressive symptoms are reported among people who are frequently the target of prejudice. Given the gravity of this problem, this research focuses on...
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The interrelationships among racial discrimination, non race-based rejection, racial identity (RI), and alcohol cognitions and use were assessed in this research. In Study 1, individuals who experienced overt discrimination and who were high in RI were less likely than those low in RI to meet criteria for alcohol abuse disorder. In Study 2, discrim...
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Here we examine the effects of both self-reported and independent observer-reported environmental risk indices, the serotonin transporter gene promoter (5HTTLPR) polymorphism, and their interaction on self-esteem. This trait was assessed during early and mid adolescence (mean age=14 and 16.5, respectively) and young adulthood (mean age=21.8) in a p...
Article
Women who have academic careers in engineering have successfully navigated the social identity threats that prevent many other women from feeling that they belong in science, technology, engineering, and math fields. In this research, we examined what factors may be related to resilience in these academic environments. Female academics in engineeri...
Article
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This research examined effects of discrimination on food decisions. In Study 1, reflecting upon past experiences of discrimination, as compared to a neutral topic, caused an increased desire to consume unhealthy foods. In Study 2, participants received a negative evaluation from a biased or fair grader. Past experiences with discrimination moderate...
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We evaluated the effect of perceived discrimination, optimism, and their interaction on health care utilization among African American adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Measures of optimism and perceived discrimination were obtained in 49 African American SCD patients. Multiple regression analyses controlling for sex and age tested effects of...
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This research examined the impact of perceived discrimination on ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and daily level affect during social interaction. For 24 hrs, adult Black and White participants wore an ABP monitor and completed palm pilot diary entries about their social interactions. Mean level and time-trend trajectories of blood pressure and hea...
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Past measurement of vitality has included both emotional and physical components. Since aspects of physical vitality such as fatigue can be indicative of physical illness, the usefulness of existing measures of vitality to predict health is limited. This research was designed to examine the psychometric properties of a new Mental Vitality Scale and...
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Perceived discrimination has been studied with regard to its impact on several types of health effects. This meta-analysis provides a comprehensive account of the relationships between multiple forms of perceived discrimination and both mental and physical health outcomes. In addition, this meta-analysis examines potential mechanisms by which perce...
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This article describes a new model that provides a framework for understanding people's reactions to threats to social acceptance and belonging as they occur in the context of diverse phenomena such as rejection, discrimination, ostracism, betrayal, and stigmatization. People's immediate reactions are quite similar across different forms of rejecti...
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The experience of race-related stressors is associated with physiological stress responses. However, much is unknown still about the complex relationship between how race-related stressors are perceived and experienced and potential moderators such as strength of racial identity. This research examines the impact of a real-life stressor and strengt...
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Recent research suggests that past exposure to discrimination may influence perceptions of, and physiological responses to, new challenges. The authors examined how race and trait levels of hostility and optimism interact with past exposure to discrimination to predict physiological reactivity and recovery during an anger recall task. A community s...
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Several reports have documented different patterns in mental health service utilization among ethnic minority groups, particularly for Black Americans, in comparison to Whites. In this research, we examined individual variables that may underlie these differences, focusing on experiences of discrimination and racial identity. We used a community sa...
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It is unclear why nonmental healthcare utilization is greater among those with psychological problems. The authors examined healthcare utilization in HMO patients to determine whether greater utilization in anxiety disorder (AD) patients was explained by anxiety symptoms (increasing sensitivity to physical symptoms) or comorbid illness (causing gre...
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This study examined the relationships between positive emotions and health. Two positive emotions were considered, hope and curiosity, in conjunction with 3 physician-diagnosed disease outcomes: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and respiratory tract infections. Medical data were abstracted over a 2-year period from 1,041 patient records from a mult...
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We sought to show that individual differences in working memory capacity are related to the ability to intentionally suppress personally relevant intrusive thoughts, and that this effect cannot be explained by differences in negative mood. Sixty participants identified their most frequent intrusive thought and then completed a thought suppression t...
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In these studies the authors examined the effects of concealing a stigma in a social interaction relevant to the stigma. An interview paradigm called for undergraduate female participants who either did or did not have eating disordered characteristics to play the role of someone who did or did not have an eating disorder (ED) while answering stigm...
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Deep cognitive activation occurs when a thought is so accessible as to have measurable effects on behavior or judgement, but is yet not consciously reportable. This state of mind has unique properties mimicking some characteristics of the psychoanalytic unconscious, but following theoretically from a consideration of processes of cognitive activati...
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Conventional wisdom has regarded low self-esteem as an important cause of violence, but the opposite view is theoretically viable. An interdisciplinary review of evidence about aggression, crime, and violence contradicted the view that low self-esteem is an important cause. Instead, violence appears to be most commonly a result of threatened egotis...
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Examined whether a card sorting procedure (FLEX) and a ways of coping checklist (WOC) could be used to measure flexibility. It was also examined how gender, age, style of impression management, and basic personality variables were related to flexibility. Results from 28 men and 32 women (aged 18–66 yrs) indicate that gender differences were not fou...
Article
Many more than ever face the crises of childhood: violence, drugs, bad schools, poverty, divorce, or two parents at work. And no one seems to care.

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