Laura E. Quiñones-Camacho

Laura E. Quiñones-Camacho
University of Texas at Austin | UT · Department of Educational Psychology

PhD Psychology

About

25
Publications
4,338
Reads
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212
Citations
Citations since 2016
23 Research Items
211 Citations
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Introduction
I am an Assistant Professor in the Human Development, Culture, and Learning Sciences program in the Educational Psychology Department at the University of Texas Austin. I use psychophysiological and neuroimaging techniques to understand early risk for psychopathology. My current work focuses on understanding the role of self-regulation, parent-child interactions, and the neural correlates of these processes on the emergence and maintenance of psychopathology in childhood.
Additional affiliations
June 2019 - present
Washington University in St. Louis
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Currently work as a Postdoctoral Researcher funded by a T32
August 2018 - May 2019
University of Pittsburgh
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher funded by a T32
September 2013 - June 2018
University of California, Riverside
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
July 2013 - June 2018
University of California, Riverside
Field of study
  • Developmental Psychology
August 2009 - May 2013

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Temper tantrums are sudden, overt negative emotional displays that are disproportionate to the eliciting event. Research supports that severe temper tantrums during the preschool period are associated with preschool psychopathology, but few studies have identified which characteristics of preschool tantrums are predictive of distal psychopathologic...
Article
A randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated that a novel psychotherapy, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy-Emotion Development (PCIT-ED), effectively treats preschool-onset depression. However, little is known about which children benefit most from PCIT-ED. As positive parent-level factors are associated with lesser depressive symptoms, this stu...
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Full-text available
Anxiety disorders are among the most common forms of psychopathology in childhood and represent a particularly concerning issue for Latinx children. Research on adults and children with anxiety suggests that the effective regulation of emotion is associated with fewer symptoms. The current study used data from 78 Latinx (predominantly Mexican Ameri...
Article
The reward positivity (RewP) is a widely studied measure of neural response to rewards, yet little is known about normative developmental characteristics of the RewP during early childhood. The present study utilized a pooled community sample of 309 4‐ to 6‐year‐old children who participated in the Doors guessing game to examine the latency and amp...
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Full-text available
While substantial research supports the role of parent–child interactions on the emergence of psychiatric symptoms, few studies have explored biological mechanisms for this association. The current study explored behavioral and neural parent–child synchronization during frustration and play as predictors of internalizing and externalizing behaviors...
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Social deficits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been linked to atypical activation of the mentalizing network. This work, however, has been limited by a focus on the brain activity of a single person during computerized social tasks rather than exploring brain activity during in vivo interactions. The current study assessed neural synchroniz...
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Full-text available
Parent-child synchrony—parent-child interaction patterns characterized by contingent social responding, mutual responsivity, and co-regulation—has been robustly associated with adaptive child outcomes. Synchrony has been investigated in both behavioral and biological frameworks. While it has been demonstrated that adversity can influence behavioral...
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In cognitive neuroscience, measurements of “resting baseline” are often considered stable across age and used as a reference point against which to judge cognitive state. The task-based approach—comparing resting baseline to task conditions—implies that resting baseline is an equalizer across participants and—in the case of studies of developmental...
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Full-text available
Emotion regulation (ER) substantially develops during the childhood years. This growth includes an increasing awareness that certain ER strategies are more appropriate in some contexts than others, but few studies have explored how children tailor ER strategies across contexts (i.e. context sensitivity). Understanding this could help clarify why so...
Article
Background: Research to date has largely conceptualized irritability in terms of intraindividual differences. However, the role of interpersonal dyadic processes has received little consideration. Nevertheless, difficulties in how parent-child dyads synchronize during interactions may be an important correlate of irritably in early childhood. Inno...
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Full-text available
Individual differences in temperament have been theorized to be supported by differential recruitment of key neural regions, resulting in the distinct patterns of behavior observed throughout life. Although a compelling model, its rigorous and systematic testing is lacking, particularly within the heightened neuroplasticity of early childhood. The...
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Most empirical studies of mindfulness have focused on the relation between mindfulness and decreased maladaptive outcomes (e.g. depression, anxiety, somatization disorders), and relatively fewer have examined the mechanisms linking dispositional mindfulness with adaptive outcomes such as well-being (e.g., happiness, life satisfaction, and positive...
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Experiencing chronic stress early in life has been linked to anxiety symptoms and related outcomes. This study examined whether emotional self-regulatory processes, specifically children’s awareness of emotion regulation strategies, would qualify the link between cumulative stress and anxiety symptoms in childhood. One hundred and twenty-nine 6- to...
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Parasympathetic regulation has been consistently linked with better emotional functioning in childhood, but it is still not clear if parasympathetic regulation serves as a transcontextual marker of adaptive emotional functioning or if this link is context‐specific. This study tested this by examining the specificity of the relation between parasymp...
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Parents and children mutually influence each other's behavior, but little work has examined how parent‐child dyads influence one another's physiological responding under conditions of emotional challenge. This is important to examine, because physiological substrates underlie the development of self‐regulation. We examined this in 97 parent‐child d...
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Aims and Objectives/Purpose/Research Questions Differences in how people regulate their emotions have been shown across cultures. Yet, whether bilinguals regulate emotions differently based on the language they are speaking is unknown, as is whether these regulatory choices relate to their physiology. The aim of this study was to assess whether sel...
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Correlates of child psychology have been studied for decades (Ollendick & Herson, 1989). Research has shown that parental psychopathology can influence child psychopathology through a combination of familial and environmental factors (Biedel & Turner, 1997; Burstein et al., 2010). Parent-child interactions have also been found to relate to child ps...
Article
Parenting behaviors greatly influence children’s ability to regulate their emotions and handle stressful situations. Stressful life events can be particularly problematic for children as they are less able to effectively manage these situations. Parenting behaviors that are warm and focus on directly helping the child handle negative emotions may s...
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Full-text available
Emotion regulation is the process through which a person changes his or her emotions. Individuals may change their emotions in many ways, and these different aspects of emotion regulation might have different implications for one’s self-esteem. Self-esteem is defined as an individual’s concept of the self. Despite the substantial research on these...
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Full-text available
Differences in the processing of emotions like fear and sadness have important implications for our understanding of many psychological phenomena (e.g., attentional biases, psychopathology). The late positive potential (LPP) is an established event-related potential that reflects motivated attention to emotional stimuli at the neural level with exc...
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Full-text available
Certain psychopathologies are often linked to dysregulation of specific emotions (e.g., anxiety is associated with dysregulation of fear), but few studies have examined how regulatory repertoires for specific emotions (e.g., the strategies a person uses to regulate fear) relate to psychopathology, and fewer still have examined this in childhood. A...
Article
Effective regulation of emotion is one of the most important skills that develops in childhood. Research interest in this area is expanding, but empirical work has been limited by predominantly correlational investigations of children's skills. Relatedly, a key conceptual challenge for emotion scientists is to distinguish between emotion responding...
Article
Children commonly experience negative emotions like sadness and fear, and much recent empirical attention has been devoted to understanding the factors supporting and predicting effective emotion regulation. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a cardiac index of parasympathetic function, has emerged as a key physiological correlate of children's se...

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