Laura Payton

Laura Payton
French National Centre for Scientific Research | CNRS · Environnements et paléoenvironnements océaniques (EPOC)

PhD
Researcher at French National Centre for Scientific Research

About

20
Publications
4,170
Reads
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192
Citations
Citations since 2017
18 Research Items
187 Citations
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Introduction
I work on biological rhythms and endogenous molecular clocks in marine organisms. I am interested in biological rhythms' disruption by anthropogenic pressures. In particular, I am interested in the impacts of Artificial Light at Night on marine organisms.
Additional affiliations
December 2021 - September 2022
University of Bordeaux
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Impact of Artificial Light At Night on marine organisms.
September 2018 - November 2021
Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg // Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • CHASE project https://www.changing-arctic-ocean.ac.uk/profile/dr-laura-payton/
September 2018 - November 2021
Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Polar Ecology, Chronobiology
Education
October 2013 - June 2017
University of Bordeaux
Field of study
  • Marine chronobiolgy and ecotoxicology
September 2011 - June 2013
University of Bordeaux
Field of study
  • Ecotoxicology and Environmental Chemistry
September 2008 - June 2011
University of Bordeaux
Field of study
  • Cellular Biology and Physiology

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
The copepod Calanus finmarchicus (Crustacea, Copepoda) is a key zooplanktonic species with a crucial position in the North Atlantic food web and significant contributor to ocean carbon flux. Like many other high latitude animals, it has evolved a programmed arrested development called diapause to cope with long periods of limited food supply, while...
Conference Paper
Objectif L’objectif de cette recherche est de découvrir si le fonctionnement de l’horloge circadienne et les rythmes transcriptomiques journaliers des organismes persistent pendant le jour polaire Arctique, quand le soleil est constamment au-dessus de l’horizon. Nous nous sommes focalisé sur le copépode Calanus finmarchicus, une espèce zooplanctoni...
Article
Full-text available
Solar light/dark cycles and seasonal photoperiods underpin daily and annual rhythms of life on Earth. Yet, the Arctic is characterized by several months of permanent illumination (“midnight sun”). To determine the persistence of 24h rhythms during the midnight sun, we investigated transcriptomic dynamics in the copepod Calanus finmarchicus during t...
Article
Full-text available
The quantity of UVA/deep violet light varies seasonally and affects locomotor activity in a marine annelid, providing cues for phenology in addition to those provided by change in photoperiod. Associated content : Veedin Rajan, V.B., Häfker, N.S., Arboleda, E. et al. Seasonal variation in UVA light drives hormonal and behavioural changes in a mari...
Article
Full-text available
The zooplankter Calanus finmarchicus is a member of the so-called "Calanus Complex", a group of copepods that constitutes a key element of the Arctic polar marine ecosystem, providing a crucial link between primary production and higher trophic levels. Climate change induces the shift of C. finmarchicus to higher latitudes with currently unknown im...
Article
Full-text available
The circadian clock provides a mechanism for anticipating environmental cycles and is synchronized by temporal cues such as daily light/dark cycle or photoperiod. However, the Arctic environment is characterized by several months of Midnight Sun when the sun is continuously above the horizon and where sea ice further attenuates photoperiod. To test...
Article
Full-text available
Marine coastal habitats are complex cyclic environments as a result of sun and moon interactions. In contrast to the well-known circadian orchestration of the terrestrial animal rhythmicity (~24h), the mechanism responsible for the circatidal rhythm (~12.4h) remains largely elusive in marine organisms. We revealed in subtidal field conditions that...
Experiment Findings
Full-text available
Supplement data of the article Bivalve mollusc circadian clock genes can run at tidal frequency.
Article
Full-text available
Organisms possess endogenous clock mechanisms that are synchronized to external cues and orchestrate biological rhythms. Internal timing confers the advantage of being able to anticipate environmental cycles inherent in life on Earth and to prepare accordingly. Moonlight-entrained rhythms are poorly described, being much less investigated than circ...
Article
Harmful Algal Blooms are worldwide occurrences that can cause poisoning in human seafood consumers as well as mortality and sublethal effets in wildlife, propagating economic losses. One of the most widespread toxigenic microalgal taxa is the dinoflagellate Genus Alexandrium, that includes species producing neurotoxins referred to as PST (Paralytic...
Article
Blooms of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium spp., known as producers of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), are regularly detected on the French coastline. PSTs accumulate into harvested shellfish species, such as the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and can cause strong disorders to consumers at high doses. The impacts of Alexandrium minutum on C. gi...
Article
Full-text available
In this work, we study if ploidy (i.e. number of copies of chromosomes) in the oyster Crassostrea gigas may introduce differences in behavior and in its synchronization by the annual photoperiod. To answer to the question about the effect of the seasonal course of the photoperiod on the behavior of C. gigas according to its ploidy, we quantified va...
Article
Full-text available
RNA interference is a powerful method to inhibit specific gene expression. Recently, silencing target genes by feeding has been successfully carried out in nematodes, insects, and small aquatic organisms. A non-invasive feeding-based RNA interference is reported here for the first time in a mollusk bivalve, the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. In...
Thesis
Full-text available
Harmful algal blooms of Alexandrium minutum are constantly increasing at the global level, accentuated by anthropogenic contributions and global warming, causing ecological, economical and sanitary problems. During exposition to A. minutum, paralytic phycotoxins (PSP) accumulation differs between diploid and triploid oysters. Moreover, many physiol...
Article
Full-text available
As a marine organism, the oyster Crassostrea gigas inhabits a complex biotope governed by interactions between the moon and the sun cycles. We used next-generation sequencing to investigate temporal regulation of oysters under light/dark entrainment and the impact of harmful algal exposure. We found that ≈6% of the gills’ transcriptome exhibits cir...
Article
Full-text available
Paralytic shellfish toxins (PST) bind to voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) and block conduction of action potential in excitable cells. This study aimed to (i) characterize Nav sequences in Crassostrea gigas and (ii) investigate a putative relation between Nav and PST-bioaccumulation in oysters. The phylogenetic analysis highlighted two types of...
Poster
Full-text available
As a marine organism, the oyster Crassostrea gigas inhabits a complex biotope governed by interactions between the moon and the sun cycles. We used next-generation sequencing to investigate temporal regulation of oysters under light/dark entrainment and the impact of harmful algal exposure. We found that ≈6% of the gills’ transcriptome exhibits cir...
Article
Full-text available
Using measurements of valve activity (i.e., the distance between the two valves) in populations of bivalves under natural environmental conditions (16 oysters in the Bay of Arcachon, France, in 2007, 2013, and 2014), an algorithm for an automatic detection of the spawning period of oysters is proposed in this brief. Spawning observations are import...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
As the Arctic Ocean is warming, many marine organisms are moving northwards to take advantage of new habitats. Such migrations result in exposure to different day-lengths (or photoperiods), which can be extreme when compared with lower latitudes. Since photoperiod is central to the timing of many life-cycle events and the ‘setting’ of the biological circadian clock, the consequences of migrating ‘up north’ are as yet unknown. The aim of the project is to determine if changes in photoperiod, known to negatively affect many terrestrial organisms, will also affect marine zooplankton, centrally important to the functioning of the Arctic ecosystem. This project is co-funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF, Germany) and by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, UK), Changing Arctic Ocean (CAO) project. Co-lead investigators: Dr Kim Last (Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS)) and Professor Dr Bettina Meyer (University of Oldenburg/AWI). More info: https://www.changing-arctic-ocean.ac.uk/project/chase/
Project
This project aims to study, through a chronobiological approach, the clockwork of the Arctic scallop Chlamys islandica, especially during the polar night. The scientific context of this project, supported by recent studies, is that polar night could be associated to a time of high biological activity in marine organisms, although the prevailing paradigm suggests the opposite situation with the presence of biological quiescence during polar night ,. We have already shown that the circadian rhythm of valve behavior is maintained even through the polar night. In the present project, we propose to study: a) Endogenous mechanisms underlying the circadian rhythm; b) Their synchronization by light intensity variations; c) their impact on the cyclic transcriptome of the scallop. The molecular clockwork will be investigated in relationship with the valve behavior of scallops. Finally, this study will be put into perspective to exacerbated global warming at the poles.